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Brotherman

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About Brotherman

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    Physician Assistant

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  1. Hi! My name is Tim Loerke. I have been a physician assistant for over 7 years. My clinical background includes emergency medicine, orthopedic surgery, occupational medicine, and pain management. I am also adjunct faculty at a local PA school and have served on several admissions councils. With all that out of the way...I am passionate about helping you walk through this confusing, arduous, and often times defeating process. Each and every one of you wants to be a PA so badly but the hardest task before you is not one based upon desire or effort. It comes down to the simple vote of confidence by a group of adults responsible for your future. I want to help navigate you through this endeavor and help you achieve the hopes and aspirations you've held onto over the years. As your mentor, I will offer multiple services: 1. Review & edit your personal statement 2. Help to construct an essay that best reflects who you are and what the ADCOMs are looking for 3. Review & edit supplemental secondary applications 4. Review your application and academic records for general feedback 5. Strategize plans for re-application, ways to acquire more experience, and any other ideas to improve the application 6. Preparation & mock sessions when you are invited for an interview 7. Be readily available via email, text, phone, or video conferencing as needed 8. While in PA school, I can help discuss study strategies for didactic and the PANCE 9. I will also provide any helpful tips for clinical rotations as well as the job hunt I want to help you. The time I will invest in you will have huge payoffs. The cost for you is a one-time fee of $100. 10 years ago when I was navigating the path for PA school application, I often thought how helpful and fortifying it would be to have a professional walk alongside me so I wouldn't feel alone. Please PM if you are interested in linking up with me to assist you on this journey. All The Best To My Future Colleagues! Tim Loerke, PA-C
  2. Hi! I’m Tim Loerke. I’ve practiced as a PA for over 7 years and have served on several admissions councils. There many personal statements that look the same but the ones that stand out likely will capture an interview. One of my favorite professional activities includes helping students navigate the precarious process of applying to PA school. For a small fee of $50, I will personally work with you on first impressions of the essay, restructuring, and editing of your personal statement. I will also spend time looking over your CV and transcripts if desired to gather your chances of acceptance. Now, this would be based upon my opinion and not a 100% guarantee. I will help you consider strategies for reapplication if need be. I know what it’s like to chase hard after a life calling only to be held up by the gatekeeper. Once you’re in, it’s all up to you. Ultimately, it’s a game. It’s a strategic approach. I would like to help you in the process. Please DM me if interested. Best of Luck to You All! Tim Loerke, PA-C
  3. I started a new job in orthopedic surgery 4 months ago with an orthopedic surgical group. Some of the surgeons allow residents to train under them in the OR and clinic. So far, the residents have been cool and I’ve learned some stuff from them. However, I sometimes get the sense I am jockeying for position as the first assist. Ultimately, my role is to assist the primary surgeon. For instance, during shoulder scopes the resident will stand at the head of patient (lateral positioning), then the surgeon, and then I’m towards the feet of the patient. I noticed I’m pretty useless down there. Last week, I was respectfully assertive and stood at the head so I could actually assist. Total joints are a different story...I’m across from the surgeon and the resident is next to the surgeon by the head. My question is, what should my approach be? Should I appropriately establish myself as first assist? The resident and I will sometimes switch as to who is the main assist. I’ve also found myself be a little more in tune with opportunities to be steps ahead of the primary surgeon ready to be there to assist the next move...but I’m not in the main position and I watch the resident miss an opportunity. I would imagine that as I gain more experience and earn the trust of the surgeons, maybe my role will be more clear? I want to do my job well but not be a d***. Any orthopedic PAs or surgical PAs work with residents in the OR? How do handle things?
  4. Are you at the point where you keep receiving the same type of feedback about your personal statement? “Great job”, “Too bland”, “Needs work.” I remember wanting someone to just take the time to give genuine reflection rather than the packaged answers. If you are that person who wants honesty and helpful comments, I would like to extend my time and attention towards you. Just for my time, I will charge $30. I have already worked with two other students under this agreement and have given more time than what this small fee would naturally cover. But it’s worth it to me and I personally believe it will be worth it to you. Please PM me if you’re interested. Tim Loerke, PA-C
  5. Are you at the point where you keep receiving the same type of feedback about your personal statement? “Great job”, “Too bland”, “Needs work.” I remember wanting someone to just take the time to give genuine reflection rather than the packaged answers. If you are that person who wants honesty and helpful comments, I would like to extend my time and attention towards you. Just for my time, I will charge $30. I have already worked with two other students under this agreement and have given more time than what this small fee would naturally cover. But it’s worth it to me and I personally believe it will be worth it to you. Please PM me if you’re interested. Tim Loerke, PA-C
  6. Are you at the point where you keep receiving the same type of feedback about your personal statement? “Great job”, “Too bland”, “Needs work.” I remember wanting someone to just take the time to give genuine reflection rather than the packaged answers. If you are that person who wants honesty and helpful comments, I would like to extend my time and attention towards you. Just for my time, I will charge $20. I have already worked with two other students under this agreement and have given more time than what this small fee would naturally cover. But it’s worth it to me and I personally believe it will be worth it to you. Please PM me if you’re interested. Tim Loerke, PA-C
  7. I’ve been a physician assistant for over 6 years and still remember the stress of writing my personal statement. I see so many pre-PA students post on the forum with requests to review and/or edit their PS, often many posts go unanswered. I would like to offer my services to assist you in preparing for the application process. For $20 I will review, edit, and offer any helpful feedback within 24 hours (this could be helpful for those who like to wait until the last minute). PM me if you are interested. I am adjunct faculty with my local PA program and have reviewed countless applications. If you are looking for help or tired of not getting an answer back about your PS, you know where to find me. Tim Loerke, PA-C
  8. Throw-away, sorry man. Sounds rough. I echo the advice from those above. Eventually I want to go into academia. My hope is to not forget what it was like to be a student and adapt accordingly. Finish strong, my friend.
  9. JohnnyM2, this is the first I've heard of the team interview. I'm a 2011 alum who just moved to Kentucky. I helped out with UK interviews and was part of their group interviews. There, they worked through an objective together as a team. The purpose is to evaluate how people work together. So, with that said, I don't know exactly what UNT will do. I'd imagine the same type of scenario. My advice is to not be a wall flower but not overbearing. Be a good listener that acknowledges thoughts and opinions of others but also be a strategizer. People that I rated poorly didn't say much, allowed themselves to be walked all over, invalidated others, and were aggressive. Be yourself. Work together with people. Consider the qualities that make up a great PA with regards to teamwork and the PA-physician team...and then exemplify those.
  10. Skyblu, it's packed with pearls for all types of skill levels. The lectures are concise and to the point. You would love it, even after 4yrs of practice.
  11. If you have an iPhone or something of that nature, start writing down pediatric dosing (ml/kg, etc.). It'll save time and frustration. Don't get overwhelmed by how slow you'll initially be. Speed will come. Know your limits and when to ask for help. Even the seasoned vets include the docs on decision making. Volunteer for any complex procedures that you want to learn. Have the willing docs teach you. Don't shy away from complex because those patients will help you grow. But again, limits. Thank the nurses for anything they do to make your life easier. Read. Read. Read. Something you'll forever do. Look at vital signs closely on every patient. When you get the opportunity, go to the Emergency Medicine Bootcamp in Vegas. Money well worth spent. PM me with any questions.
  12. Pain management couldn't get me in today. I need some of that vitamin D.
  13. I haven't started a new society but I was a part of student government while in school. We called it PASA. It involves monthly meetings with the student members and at least an additional meeting with the officers. The student society can be used to facilitate so much. Whether it be service projects, fund raisers, mixers with other student societies, competition in the challenge bowl, etc. I was the AOR/HOD rep as well as the class president (class officers are separate from student societies). If I remember correctly, you'll need a faculty sponsor. They should be a good resource. It can be done. The key will be to collect your thoughts so as to cast vision and gain support/involvement from the PA students. It will be natural to get resistance from the type A students who feel they have no time for any extracurricular activities. Emphasize responsibility and involvement. We did not charge dues. It was automatic membership. Most schools will allot you a budget. We would use some of the money to provide a lunch during the meetings. PM me if you have any questions.
  14. I'm an ER PA coming from ortho. I see more osteoarthritis in people 50 on up. Remember the contributors: weight, age, genetics, and trauma/surgery. For most of my OA patients I tell them, "NSAIDs, ice, and low-impact exercise (stationary bike, elliptical machine)". For knee sprains or probable ligamentous injury, knee immobilizer and crutches...cleared by ortho follow up...you won't typically diagnose ACL or meniscus tears in the ED because of the acute nature of the injury...the pt can't relax enough...the swelling is too much...for a proper knee exam to be performed. Women in their 50's who come in for shoulder pain, consider risk factors, and consider an EKG...but 9/10 times it's rotator cuff tendinopathy...sling if needed, NSAIDs, ice, and ortho f/u. Tendonitis in wrist...velcro wrist splint, NSAIDs, and ortho f/u. The key for ortho problems is to tee them up for ortho. Splint them, xray them, treat their pain appropriately. The rest is fun...you'll see some fun xrays. Let me know if you have any questions. p.s. I use UpToDate for splint and fracture reminders...I still need reminders.
  15. Preparation for the practice of medicine is all that matters. There are no short cuts. PAs practice independently. We just do it in a team. There are very few NPs I've been impressed with and the ones I have taken notice to had lots of prior experience in their respective fields of discipline. PAs specialize by working in whatever area where the doc is in. We are adequately trained to enter any field and build from there. There are NPs I work with who were never trained or educated about suturing. Never. If you want total autonomy, go to medical school. Otherwise, become a physician assistant.
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