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DJ Bunnell MSHS PA-C

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DJ Bunnell MSHS PA-C last won the day on June 29 2014

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About DJ Bunnell MSHS PA-C

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  1. Here is a view of the future from Arizona. Mesa’s PA unit eases load for 1st respondershttp://www.azcentral.com/community/mesa/articles/20130418mesa-trv-medical-response.html
  2. Excellent 12 lead online resource is Wave Maven http://ecg.bidmc.harvard.edu/maven/mavenmain.asp
  3. I am finding this question long after it was posted. However, I recently transitioned into EP and have some insight into the issue. I serve a veteran population in an academic setting and provide full service care with my team of physicians, nurses, and EP lab staff. I see in-patients and out-patients. We have an arrhythmia clinic and a device clinic. We perform and I assist with EP Lab procedures such as device placement, generator changes, EP studies, arrhythmia ablation, tilt table testing, and cardioversion. I manage scheduling for our regional center. I provide support for our device surveillance center. It is an excellent field for PAs because it sits at the intersection of complex physiology and complex technology. There is a large and growing population with devices that need lifetime follow-up by individuals who understand their disease process and have expertise in their particular device. Atrial fibrillation and heart failure are common issues for which you are called upon to manage. It is notable that the Heart Rhythm Society accepts PAs as Fellow Members and the International Board of Heart Rhythm Examiners has certification exams to demonstrate expertise in both electrophysiology and device management. Yes, it helps to have experience with hands-on surgical skills. I come from a Cardiothoracic Surgery and Critical Care background. However, the majority of your time is spent in a complex, long term chess match. If you have good hands, have an interest in technology, and have a mind for complex physiology then this is the specialty for you.
  4. This article rings true with my personal experience of dramatically increased contact by healthcare recruiters. In addition to the Primary Care piece of the puzzle, I am noticing a vital need in the in-patient and specialty settings. Resident work rules and large patient volumes make a strong PA and NP workforce an attractive option for hospital administrators. Physasst, I would be interested in seeing links to your work. It sounds like an interesting and vital piece for the PA world to understand to have a view of the future.
  5. I have cared for children with congenital abnormalities and I have cared for the lady who faked a seizure multiple times per week after eating at a restaurant only to recover as we arrived in the ER and walk out of the ambulance. I understand the spectrum. Fair warning...I'm going to be hard on you but keep reading because I will back off at the end. Life and people are messy. Your "Don't Like" list is what life can be. My interpretation is that you wish to care for people who have become sick or injured in a manner in which you approve. I guarantee that this would be a bad opening for your essay if you were applying to get into PA school. This business is not about us. It is about people and all of their frailties. We do silly, annoying, and stupid things. Sometimes we complain of back or head pain when in reality we are so overwhelmed with our troubles that it is all we can think of saying. However, sometimes we are complaining of back pain when it turns out we have metastatic prostate cancer that was undiagnosed. (An actual case that I have seen.) Sometimes we complain of a sore throat when we actually have Ludwig's angina. (Another case that I have seen.) However, I do applaud that you are expressing your messy and complicated feelings. I am certain that you are not alone. Our working life looks a lot like that of Physicians and they have an alarming rate of dissatisfaction, depression, and suicide. Why should our ranks be different in that respect if everything else is starting to be more similar as time passes. What do I know? I don't work where you work nor do I live your life. Maybe you are getting a steady diet of misery and I should be more sympathetic to your plight. However, it is not your patients fault that you are currently in a job that is mismatched for your interests. While you are figuring out what is right for you, try spending some time putting yourself in your patients' shoes. If you label the back pain sufferer as a malingerer then you miss why they are coming to you to complain of the pain. They may not be in pain, they may have a pain syndrome that science does't really understand yet, or they may have a big problem that has a common symptom. All of that being said, if you are truly unhappy and a different perspective doesn't change your feelings then get out of this job quickly and find something you do love. Forget about what it looks like on your CV. Life is too short to be miserable every day. You owe it to yourself and the people you love to work for peace of mind and to do great things. Good luck and thank-you for sharing your story.
  6. You have a skill and background that will serve you well. Keep pushing forward and you will find a way to combine your PA education and your echo skills.
  7. Keep at it. There is a need for PAs in Cardiothoracic Surgery. I am glad that you found www.apacvs.org. Come to our summer meeting in Long Island and get experience in our skills labs and start to meet people. Bring your CV. We are your professional network. Good luck.
  8. Keep at it. There is a need for PAs in Cardiothoracic Surgery. I am glad that you found www.apacvs.org. Come to our summer meeting in Long Island and get experience in our skills labs and start to meet people. Bring your CV. We are your professional network. Good luck.
  9. Keep at it. There is a need for PAs in Cardiothoracic Surgery. I am glad that you found www.apacvs.org. Come to our summer meeting in Long Island and get experience in our skills labs and start to meet people. Bring your CV. We are your professional network. Good luck.
  10. CT Surgery is a great field that needs smart and capable people. The hours and lifestyle are generally on the longer and more intense side of PA practice. However, it is also a satisfying specialty where you are valued. The Association of PAs in Cardiovascular Surgery accepts student memberships for free. Go to www.apacvs.org to learn more.
  11. CT Surgery is a great field that needs smart and capable people. The hours and lifestyle are generally on the longer and more intense side of PA practice. However, it is also a satisfying specialty where you are valued. The Association of PAs in Cardiovascular Surgery accepts student memberships for free. Go to www.apacvs.org to learn more.
  12. CT Surgery is a great field that needs smart and capable people. The hours and lifestyle are generally on the longer and more intense side of PA practice. However, it is also a satisfying specialty where you are valued. The Association of PAs in Cardiovascular Surgery accepts student memberships for free. Go to www.apacvs.org to learn more.
  13. APACVS Critical Care Conference - July 10-14 - Long Island, NY - excellent lectures by practicing clinicians - Bioskills Course - learn hands-on critical care skills - Cardiac Surgery Advanced Life Support Course - Cardiac Mechanical Assist Course - Fundamentals of Critical Care Support Course - location convenient to Long Island beaches and New York, NY http://www.apacvs.org/conferences/2013CriticalCare/pdfs/AttendeeBrochure.pdf
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