sillycibin

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About sillycibin

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  1. Wow. Red flags here. You need to get into a new environment with better more supportive doctors.
  2. Have you read up on impostor syndrome? Your feelings aren't that unusual. Medicine is complex. There are plenty of areas in medicine to explore. If you don't like giving advice you could try to find a position just first assisting in the OR or just doing IR procedures. I've seen positions where all you do is pre-op H&Ps. You can also go into administration. It can take some effort since you have to challenge the entrenched nurse hierarchy.
  3. They're not pushing independent practice. They have settled on "Optimal Team Practice." Typical compromise type position that solves none of our problems and is doomed to fail. I think OPT is a mistake and going to just waste years of our time and money with all the lobbying required to put it into place. OPT is something we should have tried pushing 10 years ago, but the NPs are way too far ahead of us now. And it is having ramifications in the job market now for NPs vs PAs in states with independent practice. Our leadership is failing us with OTP.
  4. So we don't even have the Optimal Team Practice model in place which is still a far cry from independent practice. I think OPT is a mistake and going to just waste years of our time. OPT is something we should have tried pushing 10 years ago, but the NPs are way too far ahead of us now. And it is having ramifications in the job market now for NPs vs PAs in states with independent practice. Our leadership is failing us with OTP.
  5. I don't know of any state where PAs legally function solo and without liability for anyone else. Your supervising physician will always be liable to some extent for your actions. As others have said, lots of red flags about this situation. Did this doctor really emphasize the on your own part? Because you need a supervising physician who you can contact whenever you need to because as a new grad you will need advice very often. And really you need that supervision early on to learn by discussing patients every day.
  6. Sorry but Michigan is just another disappointing illusion of independent practice just like the West Virginia law that was under consideration and the mess that is "optimal team practice." OTP is an attempt to make PAs more palatable to doctors and hospitals in states where NPs have independent practice by reducing paperwork and attempting to shift liability, but it does not get us anywhere near independent practice. Here is some info on the Michigan law which is just the annoying shell game with verbage: Q. Does the new law remove the terms "supervision" and "delegation"? Yes. PAs in Michigan are no longer required to work under supervision or delegation of a physician according to the new law. PAs will now be required to work with a "participating physician" according to the terms in a "practice agreement." Q. Can a PA practice without a physician? No. The new law continues to support the PA and physician team. PAs will now be required to work with a "participating physician" according to the terms in a "practice agreement."
  7. At my hospital for a while the hospitalist group refused to hear consults from ER PAs. Your attending had to make the call on your behalf no matter how much they were involved in the workup.
  8. What dizzyjon said. They usually have a little wiggle room on salary just so they can go through the motions of negotiating, but don't expect them to really modify much in the contract. It's going to be a standard contract for them and you are about to be another standard piece i.e. cog in their great big machine.
  9. Was your physician in the same building as you? My understanding is that the patient should be billed under the physician's number and you get 100% reimbursement and no he doesn't have to see the patient in follow up appointments, only the initial encounter.
  10. PAs are going to soon understand why doctors have fought for so long to keep the number of residency spots down. When supply and demand in our profession flip flops(don't forget NP programs are gushing out new grads as well), you are going to see our salaries go down, job requirements go up, and the amount of crap work foisted on us increase. And new grads will be especially hard hit when you see the number of years experience requirement continue to creep up. I rarely see "will consider new grads" in job listings anymore.
  11. So I just read through the text of the West Virginia bill that got vetoed and it is an utter disappointment. A joke really. I can't believe this is what the AAPA is fighting for. All that was done was "collaborating" was substituted for "supervising," but pretty much everything else remains the same. Instead of a supervising physician you have to have a collaborating physician. You work under a collaborating physician with a collaborating agreement and can not practice without any of this in place. The collaborating physician still oversees and assumes all responsibilities for the PA. Nothing has actually changed. It is as material a change as changing our names from Physician Assistant to Physician Associate would be. This is really sad. All while NPs continue to march on.
  12. What the NCCPA has done is reprehensible! The AAPA needs to create its own certifying process ASAP. The NCCPA just signed its own death certificate with this hostile action. I fired off my own angry email at the NCCPA demanding they lobby to undo their damage and get Governor Justice to rescind his veto.
  13. I posted this elsewhere, but it bears repeating, not that it will change anything for anyone. For new grads it's becoming very hard to find jobs and only going to get worse. Medical schools have only increased enrollment 27% in the last 18 years. PA schools have increased enrollment more than 200% and NP schools have increased enrollment almost 300% in that time frame. And there is no sign of a slow down. Continuing to see more programs open and increasing class sizes. Do you see a problem?
  14. It's becoming one and only going to get worse. Medical schools have only increased enrollment 27% in the last 18 years. PA schools have increased enrollment more than 200% and NP schools have increased enrollment almost 300% in that time frame. And there is no sign of a slow down. Continuing to see more programs open and increasing class sizes. Do you see a problem?
  15. I kind of like AP - advanced practitioner. Definitely more than APP. MP makes me think of military police. Physician Associate lets us keep PA and gets rid of assistant. It sounds kind of nonsensical but so does nurse practitioner.