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hmtpnw

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hmtpnw last won the day on October 19 2018

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About hmtpnw

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  1. This week, I am continuing my series on the most common personal statement mistakes. If you didn’t catch part one, check it out here. Below, you can find five more mistakes that applicants make when writing their personal statements. Writing About Something That Makes You a “Good Applicant” - Referencing being a “strong applicant” in a personal statement is not something I am a huge fan of. Your goal throughout your academic and clinical experiences should be to build a foundation that will make a better PA student and a stronger PA. It should not be about checking off boxes just because you think that it's what adcoms want to see. Don’t list off your extracurriculars in your personal statement, including things because you feel that they make you a “more competitive” applicant. This essay is not a resume. Instead, write about experiences that you’ve had that are central to your decision to pursue this profession, not about those that you think adcoms want to hear about. Addressing Difficult Topics the Wrong Way - To include or not to include… that always seems to be the question. Whether it’s bad grades, mental health issues, struggles with addiction or other life tragedy, it’s hard to know what should be addressed in a personal statement. I find that when applicants choose to include difficult topics, they focus too much on the negative without emphasizing the positive while including lots of unnecessary details. They often don’t even mention how their experience was relevant to their journey towards the PA profession at all. The big takeaway here is if you are going to touch on a difficult topic in your personal statement, make sure that it's an integral part of your journey before dedicating characters to it. If you have decided to include it, the best thing you can do is be concise about shortcomings/difficult subject matter/etc. Don't dwell on the negative. Instead, emphasize how you addressed the issue whether it's mental health, grades, chronic illness or whatever other issue or circumstance you experienced. Did you grow from it? Did it push you towards the profession more? Did it motivate you to change something? Explore that. Forcing the Reader to Read Between the Lines - I can’t tell you how many times I highlight a sentence and make the comment, “Why?” Applicants will often say something like, “Being a paramedic/scribe/MA/EMT made me want to become a PA. It was a great experience.” But, why?! What exactly was it about this experience that drove you to pursue your goal of becoming a PA? When sharing your experiences, make sure you say exactly what you want to say. Don’t force the reader to make inferences about your feelings and insights. Using Passive, Questioning Language - This one seems minor but it can change the entire tone of your essay. Let me give you an example - “Some of my grades in my undergraduate career were not stellar, but I think that with my recent successes I am likely more prepared to take on PA school. I know it will be a challenge but I feel I could be ready.” Try to avoid using terms like, “I feel… I think… Could… Would... Probably… Likely…” when projecting your future success. Be certain of yourself in your language and your tone. Reframing this and emphasizing some stronger language - “Although I occasionally struggled early on in my undergraduate career, my more recent successes are a reflection of my true academic ability. PA school will be a challenge, but I know that I am ready and more prepared than ever to take it on.” In this iteration, you’ve said that your recent successes are reflective of your abilities, not that “they might be.” You have said that you “know” you are prepared to handle PA school as opposed to just “thinking” you could be ready. Flowery Language - Last, but definitely not least, flowery language. This one is an essay killer. “The morning was crisp and bright when I stepped out my creaky, old door. I noticed the beautiful, pink rose sprouting from the green bush, covered with dew droplets on petals that were as bold and stunning as they were fragrant.” This is drowning in unnecessary descriptors. Please, don’t do this. Adcoms don’t want to read this. You probably don’t even want to read this. It’s all filler. Tell an engaging story but avoid using flowery, overly descriptive prose that says absolutely nothing while taking up an offensive amount of characters. Be concise and intentional with your writing.
  2. Thanks so much for the shoutout. I really appreciate it
  3. Someone else is probably better suited to answer your question about online coursework, but I do want to point something out. Most programs will accept one in-progress prerequisite. Some accept two. I don’t know of any programs that accept more than two in-progress prerequisites. It sounds like you have two to three in progress prerequisites depending on the program. Just something to be aware of.
  4. I would not wait until the end. The point of the essay is to answer the question, "Why PA?" It's important that you do that. Integrate the answer to the question throughout the essay. If you'd like you can send your essay my way and I would be happy to take a look at it.
  5. Hey there! Feel free to send yours my way. Happy to help.
  6. The thing that's going to matter the most here is your overall cumulative GPA and overall science GPA. If those are below the minimums (generally a 3.0), then you will be rejected. You'll need to calculate your GPAs and see where you stand. Also, most programs will not consider medical scribing to be PCE. It's lower tier clinical experience and you will likely need more direct patient care experience to compensate for your low GPAs.
  7. You've received some solid advice regarding your scores above. I would retake it personally. With a little more studying you could score > 300. One thing I do want to mention, PA schools consider your hours at the time you submit your application. There are very few exceptions to this. You've said that you will have 2000 hours by matriculation, but these ongoing hours won't be considered when programs are evaluating your application.
  8. Hey y’all! For those of you that don’t know, I have started a personal statement editing service. I have read more than 100 statements over the last year working with PA school applicants and have really honed in on what makes a good essay. I was fortunate enough to have significant support from this community as well as r/prephysicianassistant with my own essay, and I want to pay it forward. For those of you working on your personal statements right now, feel free to DM me and I would be happy to give you some feedback on your draft for FREE. No strings attached. If you like the initial feedback I provide on your essay and you’re interested in using a service for your PS, we can talk more about working together! I want to say that there are plenty of applicants who DO NOT NEED TO USE AN EDITING SERVICE. There are people here and over on the prePA subreddit who will offer to help with your personal statement. Use them. Seriously. That being said, some essays need a lot more work than others, and in those cases working with a service (any personal statement editing service with a solid reputation, not just mine) can be helpful. Either way, I’m happy to read through things and give you some pointers, even if you’re not interested in using my paid service. If you want more information about my service, would like to check out reviews from students I helped this past cycle or are interested in reading articles I have written about the writing process, you can take a look at my page here: https://m.facebook.com/thepersonalstatementproject/
  9. Feel free to send you PS my way and I can take a look at it.
  10. I think you've definitely got a shot if you apply to schools carefully and write a killer PS. Look for programs that emphasize that last 60 credits and will appreciate your upward trend.
  11. I think you’ve received some really solid advice above. The only thing I would add is that given your current GPA, prereqs should probably be taken in person. Online classes can work for many applicants, but with a less than stellar academic history, you should be showing that you can handle rigorous science coursework that’s taught in a traditional setting.
  12. Hey y’all! I just posted a new article geared towards pre-PA students. It’s part one in a two part series about the biggest mistakes I see when critiquing and editing personal statements!
  13. Thank you so much for such a thorough response! I really appreciate it.
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