JMPAC

Members
  • Content count

    77
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

61 Excellent

About JMPAC

  • Rank
    Advanced Member

Profile

  • Profession
    Physician Assistant

Recent Profile Visitors

232 profile views
  1. [emoji51][emoji51][emoji51] Those are some pretty negative findings, but it really seemed like they were really coming after PAs. I just wonder how often things are missed or aggressive treatment is offered by MDs and DOs, as well. The examples listed are problematic, but seem liked isolated incidents that could possibly happen to anyone. I don’t know. I do always think it’s prudent to get a second or even third opinion when you’re a patient facing something potentially serious and invasive. My father in law was treated for prostate cancer and saw 3 different doctors with 3 different opinions and plans for treating it. 2/3 were much more invasive and aggressive treatments and he went with the more conservative doc and has been doing great ever since. I’m just saying, it’s medicine, not just one type of practitioner of medicine who can make these types of mistakes or misjudgments. Seems Iike an unfair and biased article.
  2. I️ agree! Medical Practitioner! MP (that’s my vote, if we ever get one)
  3. I could get behind additional or longer clinical rotations. That’s where the real learning happens and the more direct patient experience, the better. I’d say longer rotations. I️ felt like as soon as I️ was starting to really get into it, it would be time to move on. Although, there were 1 or 2 that I️ couldn’t wait to get done with, but that was preceptor related.
  4. WHAT?! [emoji35] No. How dare he? Where’s his data to back that claim up? The DEA sends that report card every quarter about prescribing stats to everyone so, I’m sure there is some kind of data, not entirely sure how you’d go about getting it. I️ actually recall reading that PAs prescribe far opiates and if I️ can find that again, I’ll let you know.
  5. I love this story, good for her! She should write a book called The Devil Wears Green Scrubs, a little medical version of Devil Wears Prada, haha. (The book where the main character tells her boss to eff off, NOT the lame movie where you don’t get the good ending)
  6. I thought that, too! Haha I️ agree with those who are saying to start the job search, basically yesterday. It takes months to interview with enough places to make a decision and they often want you to do several interviews with different people, then a little back and forth about offers and contracts, then the credentialing and other red tape. It could easily take 5 months. I think if a doc was yelling at me, I would schedule a meeting with them or HR or whoever it is that you can talk to and lay it out there. You’re all supposed to be professionals and you’re not going to be spoken to that way.
  7. I don’t like the idea of PAs being required to have a doctorate. I️ knew a couple PTs that had master’s and then had to do online doctorate programs just for the sake of having them and literally nothing changed about their jobs. I’m married to a PT and we both would’ve been happy with one less year of tuition for a master’s instead of the doctorate. PT school is expensive and making it a doctorate didn’t do anything impressive for their salaries, so it was probably a pretty poor investment if you look at the numbers (good investment if that’s your dream job that you’re passionate about). If we start doing doctorates and residencies, will we be paid accordingly afterwards? I️ wasn’t interested in a residency. To be fair, I️ got into a great EM job that is a great learning environment and I’m a learn on the job type of person (part of why PA appealed to me). I️ know a couple people who went into residencies right after school and they basically just had jobs that paid WAY less and added a few course work type things. I went to a few conferences, study, do continuing ed and make about 3 times as much money as one of my residency friends. Will it help them get jobs in the future? Not sure that’s any different from me either, as I just did get a new job and in the process had no problems getting interviews and turned down several offers before picking the best fit. I️ don’t know all the things about all the residencies, this is just my perspective and what I’ve seen of them. I’ve always thought of the PA career as just a different path to practicing medicine. Its for people who don’t want to spend so many years in course work and testing, more hands on, jump right in type learners, have different life experiences and careers, want flexibility instead of committing to a specialty forever, etc, etc. If we get doctorate degrees and have to do residencies, why not just do DO or MD? It’s great to have residencies out there as an option, but I️ don’t think it should be a requirement. What about these MD students that never get a residency? Isn’t there some kind of shortage or issue with that? PA programs are already struggling to find all their clinical rotations, wouldn’t making residency a requirement really limit how many people actually become a PA? Schools can keep taking lots of students and not care if there are enough residencies for them to continue into. Then there a bunch of super invested and in debt, educated and willing prospective PAs that will never practice because there weren’t enough residency spots? This same thing happens with registered dietitians. There are very limited internships (which are required prior to taking a national exam) so a lot of nutrition and dietetic students get through their undergrad work and then can’t become RDs because of the brutally competitive internship situation (because of the number of applicants vs limited spots). That’s a blessing in disguise for some because they go on to become PAs instead. ;) Once again, my post has become ridiculously long. I just see these ideas above about changing the PA path so much that it may as well be DO/MD at some point and just not exist. I️ don’t think the current education system is really all that flawed. All the PAs I️ meet are smart, capable, professionals who provide fantastic patient care. We have to be doing something right!
  8. Time for a new job. You don’t deserve that treatment and it’s not all that uncommon for your first job to not quite work out. I’ve heard plenty of stories of new grad jobs that were left in a year or less due to these kinds of issues. Also, I wouldn’t take unpaid call. I don’t know if you’re salaried and they’re lumping it in, but if you’re working you should be paid.
  9. Not sure how well you will like PA school if you’re someone who needs a lot of sleep and is looking for “low stress” situations.
  10. Haha, that’s amazing. I️ really wish I️ could sleep at work. Sometimes we’ll have a patient who is snoring so loud that you can hear them down the hall and I️ feel like they’re just really rubbing it in my face.
  11. Oh my gosh, that is ideal! I️ think I’d be golden if I could do that, but I’m busy pretty much the whole time I’m at work. I feel like I️ spend so much time trying to schedule when I️ can sleep, these days. It’s harder than you’d think, haha. One caveat so as not to scare the OP, too much: I️ do have a toddler and have to schedule a nanny in order to sleep, so have a set amount of available sleep time during the day and if I️ can’t get myself to sleep during it, I’m screwed. Night shift was much easier pre-baby when I had all day to relax and sleep.
  12. Night shift is awesome while you’re there. Where I️ work, the night crew is friendlier than the day crew, no admin people, you can skip meetings and just get the summary later, make more money and everyone you work with is so grateful you’re doing it so they don’t have to. I’ve done nights for the past 2 years and have loved it until recently. I️ am still really happy with the actual shift but the past couple months I’ve have just felt messed up from it and it really affects my life outside of work. I’ve started having issues with insomnia and taking Advil PM and unisom type things gave me all kinds of side effects. Last week I️ had an issue where I️ couldn’t sleep well and ended up getting less than 6 hours of sleep in 48 hours and then (thanks to my SO’s support) slept for about 20 hours in the next 24. Towards the end of my last shift I️ actually had a little mini hallucination of words moving around on paper because I️ was just so low on sleep. Your first day/night off doesn’t really count as time off because you have to figure out how to transition to day time and spend time with normal humans or you have to sleep and then just be up at night again. You can figure out a strategy for your days off and as long as your body agrees to sleep when you tell it to, you should be fine. I’ve spent several social events as a zombie trying to be a day person and interact with people. The moral of the story is, nights are great if you’re able to take care of yourself and get enough rest. When it starts taking a toll on you, time for a change, which is what I’m doing after my next 90 days are up.
  13. I say move for cheaper tuition. As someone on the other side who is facing their loans, I think you will be glad you did. Also, Portland is pretty awesome. It’s not like you’re asking her to move somewhere terrible. There is a lot to do and I think people are pretty friendly. My SO and I have done a few moves and they’ve been great experiences. We moved to a different state with no family on our one year anniversary and it was one of the greatest times. We weren’t in school yet, but we spent tons of time together exploring a new place and really became “us” while we were out on our own and making our own life together. You’ll be studying a lot in school, but you’ll also have time to explore a new place with her. There are breaks and weekends. We became close friends with our classmates and their significant others. And the significant others became friends with each other. The main thing is that cheaper tuition, though. Haha