Jump to content

bovineplane

Members
  • Content Count

    31
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

11 Good

1 Follower

About bovineplane

  • Rank
    Advanced Member

Profile

  • Profession
    Physician Assistant

Recent Profile Visitors

133 profile views
  1. I can't speak specifically to Army or Navy NG. I did spend a few years in the reserves early in my career (90s) when I was a lab tech. It really depends on what type of job/unit you are assigned to. I was assigned to a blood donor center in the Midwest. We were attached to two active duty donor centers one at fort leonardwood and one at fort Hood. Our contingency plan for activation was to augment one or the other. Not a bad gig for "deployment" I thought. Not long after joining my unit I was in Kosovo. Nobody mentioned the contingency plan was only that. I was grabbed by a hospital unit which was short lab techs and deployed for 9 months. As a PA you can be assigned to anything from an infantry unit to a hospital and everything in between. If you get an FST (forward surgical team) you could be gone - alot. If you are assigned to a finance unit you may never deploy but can always be taken by another unit. In addition with the guard you are subject to state missions which I don't have experience with. Maybe ask a few questions about perspective units you would be assigned to. Unlike active duty the guard and reserve recruits for very specific slots. They will know what unit of assignment you would be assigned to. Your required first contract would likely be 3-4 years. Ask about bonuses as I know the reserves offers a bonus for PAs. I suspect the guard would be the same but Navy may have different options. I know none of that is specific to or answers your comparison question but there are likely only a small handful of people who have been PAs in both Navy and Army to provide a direct comparison. Good luck on your decision.
  2. I was recorded without my consent once. I asked legal about it. Texas is a one party state which meant only one party has to provide consent to recording. Patient edited the recording. Claimed I told him his back pain was present because he was fat and cursed at him. I admitted to reviewing his bmi and explaining obesity categories. Further, I reviewed the aafp risk factors for lbp including obesity. Only term ever used was morbid obesity and not anything derogatory. Additionally I never cursed at him. He simply edited the recording to go from back pain because you are obese. Wasn't hard to tell because he wasn't good at editing and you could hear the cuts. It is what it is. If you are concerned, find it from legal what your rights are. Always assume you are being recorded and speak as if you are. Best you can do.
  3. Maybe they only provide the average for the same block? Meaning your group of questions and time. Hard to say. Friend of mine taking the pilot has had the same time limits each block and has the same overall averages on his homepage. Hard to say.
  4. AFCS is divided in half at completion of PA school. TIS, BASD etc is not affected. This is why the change in rank does not effect eligibility. There have been several ideas tossed around the Army PA community as to why this change was made. For instance - I was accepted and started IPAP April 2011. Completed October 2013. Retiring Jan 2020. The Army got 6ish years out of putting me through school. I had 14 years AFS when I graduated. My selection year was the largest in the history of IPAP for the Army and we are down to 37 remaining on AD for the O4 board next year. What the Army wants is a Soldier to finish PA school between 8-12 years AFS. Why? The service obligation is 4.5 years. This puts graduates in the position of leaving the Army at 12-16 years AFS or staying 6-10 more years after the ADSO. Many would choose to stay for retirement. It is cheaper to retain than train a new PA. Apologies for all the acronyms but it seemed the OP was military and should understand them.
  5. Just crumble up a small ball of foil. Use the spatula or similar instrument to press it into the grill grates like a brush. Always clean and cheap. In my area discarded foil can now be placed into recycle bins for those who think it is wasteful.
  6. I agree with above posters. On each block there are 1-2 I get wrong I disagree with. 1-2 I simply misread. So far, after the first two blocks the pilot claims the overall average from all PAs taking the pilot to be 74%. This is 72% from the first block and 76% from the second. Third block still pending for all. Difficulty has not seemed to change from block to block. Still nothing on what passing is but if 74% holds and is the 50th percentile for all test takers and NCCPA goal of 90-95% passing I would think the passing grade would be in the 60s overall. Certainly NCCPAs voodoo math will be different than my expectation. One thing to note is the average they give does not explain if they have removed no-shows or people who failed to complete the block. Could be driving down the average overall. It also could explain the 4% increase from block 1 to block 2. After two complete blocks hopefully all those choosing not to continue have left and the results can help each of us "measure up" to the average. At the end of block 4 everyone should have a good idea of where they stand compared to average.
  7. If you meet commission standards of ar 40-501 chapter 2 and general admin military requirements for commission, then yes.
  8. I can't speak for AF. Army has it set up with tuition assistance that allows you to turn in the pre-reqs to the Ed center for your "degree plan" which allows TA coverage. I would bet AF has similar set up. Email the ipap selection director. Certainly the Airforce has someone that does it. Also, look for the IPAP Facebook page and request to join. Lots of good info on there from AF and Army.
  9. Offer is solid. Friend of mine is looking for $135k and having trouble. He is willing to forgo insurance and still having tough time getting to his number. He wasn't offered the benefit PTO package you were either. Two years in Ortho, looking in the coastal Florida area. Congrats on the new job. Enjoy!
  10. Offer isn't terrible since you liked the rotation and feel the location is ideal. Might counter with a bit higher base but benefits are solid.
  11. I learned more about medicine in 6 months as a solo provider to 400 Soldiers while deployed than in years working in the clinic. Nothing prepares you for being scared like worrying every day about being alone without xray, labs, limited medications. It forces you to do a good history and PE as that is really all you have. We had urine dipsticks, vitals machine, stethoscope, otoscope, opthalmoscope, few other tools. We were two hours by vehicle to nearest next level of care. I had a radio which I could relay messages which doesn't help at all in an emergency. During the deployment I was trained in neutering cats, several dental procedures, lots of random ID and rashes, trauma, ATLS, etc . We had access to an online consult system which allowed me to digitally interact with specialist all over the military and each consult turned into a learning experience. Spent a year in Korea at a small clinic. Not nearly as remote. We had a joint partnership with the Korean national University medical system. Monthly meetings and lectures. Lots of learning with specialists trained at some of the world's best universities. I attended the international military medical conference in Jordan at the dead sea in 2014. Great time. Docs and providers from all over the world. 4 days of lectures on any and everything you can think of. Original research presentations, demonstrations and of course medical sales. Yes, as a PA you will likely deploy. Yes deployments will take you from your family if that is a concern. Deployments will help you grow as a provider in ways that are hard to explain. Working in a hospital with 10 other providers grinding through an Ed shift may sound like a learning environment but it pales in comparison to military medicine in certain situations. There are drawbacks for sure. I have spent 5-6 years away from my family on deployments. Add in the jrtc, ntc, field training etc and I hate to think how much time I have spent away from home. At the same time I would not trade it for being a new grad thrust into the real world fresh out of school to fend for myself.
  12. I have two contacts at Fort Drum. No idea if they can help you with clinicals but they may know someone who can. Shoot me a PM.
  13. Old thread. Check USAjobs. I was in Korea until last summer. They had openings and would hire anyone qualified. While former military would have hiring preference there was nobody applying for these jobs. As long as you qualify for federal employment and are willing to go through the hoops for federal employment and there are openings, yes you could be hired. The pay for Korea was actually pretty good. Not sure if they would hire a new grad. Depends on how bad they want to fill the slot.
  14. Google military pay charts. Public info. BAH rates depends on location. Army offers $15k/year for four year commitment to direct commission PAs. Add BAS which is $254.39 monthly. Specialty pay of $912/month. Add it all up = your pay. As direct commission pay won't be bad. For example: O2 with < 2 years in service $3673.50/month BAS $254.39/month Board cert pay and incentive pays $912/monthly (this is two special pays combined for simplicity) BAH example zip 31419 (Savannah) with dependants $2064/month Direct commission PA bonus (Army) $1250 month (15 k lump sum paid annually, this isn't paid monthly) Total 8153.59/monthly. Roughly $98k per year for 31419 first year. After the first 4 years the bonus could if you choose to re-up for 4 years would increase to $20k per year in 4 year blocks. Base pay jumps every 2 years and again with promotions. Bah increases with rank but varies with zip code. Bas and board cert pay is constant. For example in real life. Me. Over 20 years O3E my total compensation is $112k. I do not have a current bonus which could increase my pay to $132k. Hope this helps.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Welcome to the Physician Assistant Forum! This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn More