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afontana

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About afontana

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  1. No I didn’t get anything. I had confirmed and paid for my seat, but didn’t see the part about signing the student conduct page so I sent that a few days after, then just got a “cool thanks” after that. No other emails though lol
  2. I interviewed 9/27 and was accepted on 10/2! UTMB class of 2022 here I come!!!!
  3. I submitted May 30th, but was a reapplicant so my stuff was verified within the next day or so.
  4. For those of you that interviewed with Stephens, what is the interview process like and what methods do they use? I just received my invitation.
  5. Take the contractions out of the essay, they make it informal. the comma should be removed from between diabetes and while-- "type I diabetes, while entering" In the sentence starting "Unlike many of my coworkers, I used transport times", I would take out the "unlike your coworkers" part to not "shame" your coworkers but highlight how you used your time wisely. Rhetorical questions are also not a good idea to have in formal statements like these.. "How could I take care of my patients if I became too sick to work safely?"
  6. To some, it is a strange concept to want a career where your time is spent with people on their worst days and to have passion for a position when, on some occasions, decisions you make may be the difference between life and death. We in the medical field are often asked why we want to spend every day with people who are vomiting, bleeding, broken, or dying. In return, the answer usually follows the lines of because we can, we need to, we love to, and sometimes because if we do not, no one else will. I cannot imagine working a job where I am not able to interact with people every day, heal and help them, and for some be the only source of comfort and relief they have. My college tenure started on a shaky note after transferring from Missouri after my first semester. I did not receive a strong science background from my small high school, which did not have funds to adequately supply science classes. Everything science-based presented to me in college was essentially on a first-time basis, though the classes are structured for students who are expected to know at least the basics of the topics. The lack of exposure showed in a few of my core science class grades. I returned home to attend Blinn College when my grandmother became ill and required consistent home care. I integrated her needs in with my class schedule, helping her get dressed for the day and driving her to doctor’s appointments. My schedule was split between school and caring for her, but my grades showed improvement. That year was my first consistent look into the life of patient care, but it felt natural and reminded me of why I wanted to practice medicine in the first place. Pharmacy was not a career that would allow me to physically be involved with patients. After speaking with several family friends who are currently practicing in the medical field, the same suggestion was given to me on several occasions: look in to being a physician assistant (PA). My grandmother, who I previously cared for, passed away a few days before the Fall 2013 term, marking a new semester beginning with loss. I decided that instead of continuing to mourn, the time would be used as an opportunity to be fully committed to my choice to become a physician assistant. I became a founding member of the first Physician Assistant Student Organization at Texas Tech University and shadowed incredible PAs who immersed me in the field and took time to educate me on the inner-workings of health care and how to treat the patients as individuals, not a list of symptoms. I have come far since my freshman year and know there is still room for improvement, but I have the strongest desire to learn as much as I can. I want my ability to care for a patient be judged on my experiences and knowledge of the practice rather than my title and would be proud to serve along side physicians who show the same passion for the profession as I do. I have had the opportunity to serve in a variety of different care settings including villages in the mountains of Guatemala and verified level II trauma ERs. Guatemala allowed me to have my first true hands-on experience in a clinical setting, where I was able to assist physicians and PAs from different backgrounds in minor procedures such as laceration repairs, wound care, and recording vital signs. For most of those patients, our group was the only source of medical care they received in their entire lives. Seeing the gratitude and respect the villagers had for us was so fulfilling, no matter if the only thing we could provide for some was comfort, vitamins, and cough medication. Being an ER Scribe has been the most rewarding as I spend time with patients and learn from and observe medical professionals in a variety of specialties. The physician and scribe work together to provide the most efficient and thorough care possible. Scribes are expected to work under high-pressure situations and comprehend specific details of emergency procedures such as laceration repairs, intubations, and central line placements. We are responsible for properly recording every pertinent detail when a doctor shouts out the physical exam for a trauma patient and EMS recalls the situation with treatments given prior to arrival. This job has allowed me to hold the hands of patients as they undergo chest tube insertions, see the grief on a family’s face when patients cannot be revived, and watch trauma teams work in perfect synchronization to save lives while documenting and absorbing every second. No matter the location, the recompense of being able to see changes we make in a patient’s life is unwavering. Sometimes it’s a “runny nose and cough” day and sometimes it’s a “CPR in the parking lot in the pouring rain” day, but no matter the situation, I want to make sure that I am there for those days and for all of the patients in between.
  7. I don't know if I would use such personifying details like a patient's name, age, and condition in the essay. Also, rhetorical questions (the part where you mentioned the question you always asked yourself) don't usually have a place in formal writing, neither do contractions. There was also a spot where you mentioned "I am drawn to the fact that physician assistants PAs are able to work in different specialties without going through additional residency training unlike physicians". physician assistant and PA does not need to be mentioned twice. You began one of your sentences with the word "but".. take that out and change it.
  8. To some, it is a strange concept to want a career where your time is spent with people on their worst days and to have passion for a position when, on some occasions, decisions you make may be the difference between life and death. We in the medical field are often asked why we want to spend every day with people who are vomiting, bleeding, broken, or dying. In return, the answer usually follows the lines of because we can, we need to, we love to, and sometimes because if we do not, no one else will. I cannot imagine working in a job where I am not able to interact with people every day, heal and help them, and for some be the only source of comfort and relief they have. My college tenure started on a shaky note after transferring from Missouri after my first semester. I did not receive a strong science background from my small high school. Everything science-based presented to me in college was essentially on a first-time basis, though the classes are structured for students who are expected to know at least the basics of the topics. The lack of exposure showed in a few of my core science class grades. I returned home and attended Blinn College when my grandmother became ill and required consistent home care. I integrated her needs in with my class schedule, including helping her get dressed for the day to driving her to doctor’s appointments. My schedule was split between school and caring for her, but my grades showed improvement. That year was my first consistent look into the life of patient care, but it felt natural and reminded me of why I wanted to practice medicine in the first place. Pharmacy was not a career that would allow me to physically be involved with patients. After speaking with several family friends who are currently practicing in the medical field, the same suggestion was given to me on several occasions: look in to being a physician assistant (PA). My grandparents, including the grandmother I had previously cared for, passed away almost exactly a year apart from each other and were two of my biggest supporters of my plan to go in to the medical field. I decided that instead of continuing to mourn, the time would be used as an opportunity to be fully committed to my choice to become a physician assistant. I became a founding member of the first Physician Assistant Student Organization at Texas Tech University and shadowed an incredible PA who immersed me in the field and took time to educate me on the inner-workings of health care and how to treat the patients as individuals, not a list of symptoms. I have come far since my freshman year and know there is still room for improvement, but I have the strongest desire to learn as much as I can. I want my ability to care for a patient be judged on my experiences and knowledge of the practice rather than my title and would be proud to serve along side physicians who show the same passion for the profession as I do. I have had the opportunity to serve in a variety of different care settings including villages in the mountains of Guatemala and verified level II trauma ERs. Guatemala allowed me to have my first true hands-on experience in a “clinical” setting, where I was able to assist physicians from different backgrounds in minor procedures such as gluing lacerations together and recording vital signs. For most of those patients, our group was the only medical care they received in their entire lives, or until we or another group returned the next year, if they even made it to that village. Seeing the gratitude and respect the villagers had for us was so fulfilling, no matter if the only thing we could provide for some was comfort, vitamins, and cough medication. Being an ER Scribe has been the most rewarding as I spend time with patients and learn from and observe medical professionals in a variety of specialties. The physician and scribe work together to provide the most efficient and thorough care possible. Scribes are expected to work under high-pressure situations and comprehend specific details of emergency procedures such as laceration repairs, intubations, and central line placements. We are responsible for properly recording every pertinent detail when a doctor shouts out the physical exam for a trauma patient and EMS recalls the situation with treatments given prior to arrival. This job has allowed me to hold the hands of patients as they undergo chest tube insertions, see the grief on a family’s face when patients cannot be revived, and watch trauma teams work in perfect synchronization to save lives while documenting and absorbing every second. No matter the location, the recompense of being able to see changes we make in a patient’s life is unwavering. Sometimes it’s a “runny nose and cough” day and sometimes it’s a “CPR in the parking lot in the pouring rain” day, but no matter the situation, I want to make sure that I am there for those days and for all of the patients in between.
  9. Near the end, it should say "I have overcome many obstacles" instead of "overcame" Fix "my family to have obtained a collegiate degree" to "my family to obtain a college degree" You can try to work on using less "I" and reporting influences you have obtained by working with medical care teams. What made you want to switch from being an EMT to a PA?
  10. how did you go from being a history major to wanting to become a physician assistant? also, I am currently a scribe so I know what an HPI is, but it might be better to clarify.
  11. To some, it is a strange concept to want a career where your time is spent with people on their worst days and to have passion for a position when, on some occasions, decisions you make may be the difference between life and death. We in the medical field are often asked why we want to spend every day with people who are coughing, vomiting, bleeding, broken, or dying. In return, the answer usually follows the lines of because we can, we need to, we love to, and sometimes because if we do not, no one else will. I cannot imagine working in a job where I am not able to interact with people every day, heal and help them, and for some be the only source of comfort and relief they have. My college tenure started on a shaky note as I transferred from the University of Missouri and their pre-pharmacy program after my first semester as a freshman. While I maintained commendable grades in all but one class that semester in Missouri, I did not receive a strong science background from my small high school; everything science-based presented to me in college was essentially on a first-time basis, though the classes are structured for students who are expected to know at least the basics of the topics. The lack of exposure showed in a few of my core science class grades. The months that followed the decision to go back to Texas proved to be mentally and emotionally jarring. During my first semester at Blinn College, my grandmother became increasingly ill and required consistent home care. I integrated her care needs in with my class schedule, including helping her get dressed for the day to driving her to doctor’s appointments and sitting with her up at the hospital. Though my schedule was split between school and caring for her, my grades showed improvement. That year was my first consistent look into the life of patient care, but it felt natural and reminded me of why I wanted to practice medicine in the first place. Pharmacy was not a career that would allow me to physically be involved with patients in a one-on-one setting. After speaking with several family friends who are currently practicing in the medical field, the same suggestion was given to me on several occasions: look in to being a physician assistant (PA). At the end of my spring semester at Blinn, I was accepted in to the pre-PA program and Honors College at Texas Tech University. Two weeks before my move across Texas, my grandfather suffered a stroke. We spent several days sitting with him in the ICU, but he eventually passed and the burial took place the day before I moved in to my new dorm at Texas Tech. I started the semester knowing no one, living in an unfamiliar town after suffering the loss of my grandfather. After completing my sophomore year in Lubbock and returning home, my grandmother, who I had previously cared for, was hospitalized until she passed away at the end of the summer; an eerily repeated scenario from almost exactly a year before. Again I was met with a new semester beginning with loss. My grandparents were two of my biggest supporters of my plan to go in to the medical field and I decided that instead of continuing to mourn, the time would be used as an opportunity to be fully committed to my choice to become a physician assistant. I became a founding member of the first Physician Assistant Student Organization at Texas Tech University and shadowed an incredible PA who immersed me in the field and took time to educate me on the inner-workings of health care and how to treat the patients as individuals, not a list of symptoms. I continue to educate myself as often as I can even after obtaining my degree, including recently completing a certification in phlebotomy. I have come far since my freshman year but I know there is still room for improvement with strongest desire to learn as much as I can. I want my ability and aptitude to care for a patient be judged on my experiences and knowledge of the practice rather than my title, and would be proud to serve along side physicians who show the same passion for the profession as I do. I have had the opportunity to serve in a variety of different care settings including villages in the mountains of Guatemala and verified level II trauma ERs. No matter the location, the reward of being able to see changes we make in the patient’s life is unwavering. Being an ER Scribe has been the most rewarding as I spend time with patients and learn from and observe medical professionals in a variety of specialties. I have held the hands of patients as they undergo chest tube insertions, seen the grief on a family’s face when patients cannot be revived, and watched trauma teams work in perfect synchronization to save lives while documenting and absorbing every second. Sometimes it’s a “runny nose and cough” day and sometimes it’s a “CPR in the parking lot in the pouring rain” day, but no matter the situation, I want to make sure that I am there for those days and for all of the patients in between.
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