Jump to content

corpsman89

Members
  • Content Count

    613
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    17

corpsman89 last won the day on May 10

corpsman89 had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

616 Excellent

2 Followers

About corpsman89

  • Rank
    Advanced Member

Profile

  • Profession
    Physician Assistant

Recent Profile Visitors

3,122 profile views
  1. I would suggest to start aggressively looking and applying in January 2020. Spend the time now getting your resume/CV, LOR's, and cover letters ready, then once January comes around you can drop them like its hot. Don't be shy to apply for NP only positions. As far as the conversion is going, I will say that there aren't too many employers super interested in new grads. To be honest, it is a risk they are taking accepting a new grad, more so if they accept a new grad that hasn't even graduated yet. Obviously there will be exceptions but I would say the majority of the time employers will NOT pay for relocation assistance, or even flights to interviews for a new grad. It sucks to be a new grad. Also, expecting 3+ months between graduation and work is a pretty standard. I was lucky and start work one month after I graduate (they are training me while I get credentialed). Out of the three desirable things (location, specialty, pay) I got two (location and pay). Good luck
  2. As far as the training, they basically have me continuing to be a PA student for 3 month while they wait on credentialing (since I can't actually work as a PA anyway). Essentially, I work one-on-one with a doc and help to see patients, order labs, imaging, and prescribe medications (on their computers likely), and present the cases to them. I will still have back up support once this training period is over. I agree with the 5 year contract, I will likely just sign the 1 year.
  3. outskirts of mid-sized town (my hometown). FQHC (not Indian reservation). Multiple locations. Can sign a 1 yr, 2yr, 3yr, or 5yr contract, but all have a 90-day out clause--So does it really matter?. If you sign the 5 year contract, you will earn a 4 week sabbatical on top of regular PTO. BASE salary: 90,000 which is calculated at seeing 13 pts/day. (if you see under 13, you still get 90,000) Every pt seen after 13 /day is $38 /encounter. So if I see 18 Pts a day = additional $190 per day. This is all calculated into each paycheck. Schedule: M-F, 8-5, 4 clinic days, 1 administrative day (can work from home or office), 20 and 40 minute appointments. would work two different locations which are equal in distance from home. Malpractice: FTCA, w/ tail. Basically if someones sues me they are essentially suing the government. Health: Employee covered 100%, otherwise family is about 240 of month for premium with 4000 deductible. Employer contributes 100 per month to premium. Vision, dental covered. PTO: 19.5 days. 4 week sabbatical if sign the 5 year contract (but still has 90-day out clause) Retirement: 401B: 6% matching. CME: $1500, 5 days. Sick time: 40 hours per year Bonus: $2000 every year Licensing/DEA paid yearly. $500 professional membership allowance. No cost short term disability, no cost life insurance equal to one years salary. 8 holidays off. There is loan repayment, but I wont need it (VA paid for PA school). I think this is a pretty solid offer, and I really enjoyed talking with the CEO/med director and COO. They seem like good people, and even spoke with me for about an hour and a half over the phone going over everything.
  4. Take it. Its better to have a job that you know you will enjoy, with a good collaborating physician. The urgent care side of things will help you keep up with some procedures. Use the extra time to spend with your wife and son, its not all about the money.
  5. It actually will depend on what school you apply to. I feel that patient transport and especially housekeeping should NOT count as HCE, but I imagine some schools might count it, which is a shame.
  6. As someone who is also a soon to be new grad (august), and has recently accepted a hospitalist 7on/7off position at a small rural hospital, I would say that commute would be a deal breaker in your particular situation. I have a wife, and two kids and I could not fathom that commute, along with a 12 hour day. It's simply not sustainable whether you commute, or rent a place,. It is a decent offer, but 15 patients as a hospitalist, especially a new grad is quite a bit, otherwise salary and benefits appear to be pretty solid.
  7. Depends on the city. Phoenix is very PA friendly, but Tucson is quite the opposite. Tucson Medical Center almost exclusively hire NPs, and blatantly does not consider PAs for most jobs.
  8. UPDATE: I made an issue about the lack of benefits (CME, 401k, LIc/DEA, etc) and they went ahead and raised monthly amount to 11,256 per month, based on 67/hr. Not the best solution given that the more you make the more they take, but at least it's something. I was reassured that the hospitlist whom I will work with will be giving me a reduced census in the beginning, and he understands that as a new grad I am not going to be able to keep up with more experienced providers. Overall, I am fairly happy about the position. It will give me a great experience, and is in the hospital I used to work at.
  9. So I guess the reason for the lack of benefits is this used to be a 1099 position, but was recently (like this month) switched to a W-2 Position, to include health insurance, and malpractice. I guess they are planning on including other benefits in the future, but not right this second. You know how that goes...
  10. Hey guys, I am gearing to graduate in August and was recently offered a position as a hospitalist at the old hospital I used to work at. The hospital fairly small (49 beds), semi rural, NOT critical access. Daily census is about 20-25 for entire hospital I would be employed by a staffing agency, NOT the hospital itself. Here is what was offered: Schedule/details: the usual 7 days on - 7 days off, 12 hour shifts. Would be working 7a - 7p. Would have fellow hospitalist (MD) there during the day. Recruiter said typically census is about 20-25 patients total, and we would be splitting those in half. Talked to MD hospitalist that I'd be working with and he said he wants me to "shadow" him for several weeks, and then slowly let me carry pts on my own. No real training period otherwise. We are required to cover the ICU. Would be responsible for admitting, carrying, and ultimately discharging patients. Salary: Contract states 10,920 per month, which is based on working 7 - 12's two times per month (168 hours). Makes sense to me. It's essentially $65/hr. If I work more than my designated 168 hours per month, I am paid $66/hr. They will be providing malpractice insurance, although contract doesn't explicitly state what kind. Benefits: Health insurance, that's basically it. NO CME $$, NO PTO or time off, No DEA $$, NO Retirement. So my initials thoughts are: that's a lot of money for a new grad! However, the responsibility I would have is HUGE as a new grad and I am not sure I could handle it. I feel the pay somewhat makes up for the lack of other benefits, but still a bummer about no PTO (although I would still have 7 days off every other week), and no retirement. THoughts?
  11. disability rating = service connection. So if you do not have a disability rating than you will not qualify for it. The GI bill does chip away at voc rehab benefits, but there is a way to file for an extension. PM me if you want any more info.
  12. If you are service connected then look into Vocational Rehabilitation. I used all of my GI bill benefits in undergrad too. Qualified for Voc Rehab and they are paying for PA school in its entirety, plus housing stipend. Go to eBenefits, then request an appointment for Voc Rehab. It may change your life. Had a classmate (started PA school with Loans), looked into Voc rehab after starting PA school, qualified, and Voc rehab payed all his previous loans.
  13. Lucky enough to have had the VA pay for all tuition and provide living expenses! Grateful! Debt: $0
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Welcome to the Physician Assistant Forum! This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn More