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cpkpa

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About cpkpa

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    Physician Assistant

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  1. I think the theme of your statement is very clear and speaks volumes. There are many schools with values similar to yours. However, I don't feel like I've learned anything about you other than you work as a paramedic. You don't even share how you felt when Emma died. Overall, very good theme for your first draft! :)
  2. Hi all! I'm planning to apply this cycle for Class of 2019. For those who were accepted or waitlisted, can you share your stats like cumulative and science gpa were? I see that the minimum gpa requirement is 2.7 for science and cumulative! Any info is greatly appreciated! Thank you in advance.
  3. Hi all! I'm planning to apply this cycle for Class of 2019. For those who were accepted or waitlisted, can you share your stats like cumulative and science gpa? I see that the gpa requirement is 2.7 for science and 3.0 for cumulative! Any info is greatly appreciated! Thank you in advance.
  4. Hi all! I'm planning to apply this cycle for Class of 2020. For those who were accepted or waitlisted, can you share you stats like cumulative and science gpa, gre score? I see that the minimum gpa requirement is 2.75 for both cumulative and science! Any info is greatly appreciated! Thank you in advance.
  5. Hi all! I'm planning to apply this cycle for Class of 2019. For those who were accepted or waitlisted, can you share you stats like cumulative and science gpa, gre score? I see that the gpa requirement is 2.75 for both cumulative and science! Any info is greatly appreciated! Thank you in advance.
  6. Hi all! Has anyone heard back about their acceptance? If so, congrats, if not, good luck! I'm planning to apply for the class of 2019. I see online the minimum gpa requirements are 2.5 cum/science. Would any of you accepted/waitlisted be willing to share your stats like cum/sci gpa and gre scores? Any info is greatly appreciated. Thank you in advance!
  7. Hi all! I'm planning to apply this cycle for Class of 2019. For those who were accepted or waitlisted, can you share you stats like cumulative and science gpa, gre score? I see that the gpa requirement is 2.75 for both cumulative and science! Any info is greatly appreciated! Thank you in advance.
  8. Thank you all! Will work on it some more this weekend!
  9. I want to know what Mrs Doe wants to chat about over coffee and more about Mr. Z's jokes. Make the reader want to join you!
  10. I think your intro needs some work. It seemed like you were about to describe an awesome experience doing a human dissection or open heart surgery but then you flipped and flopped between other things. "The electrical signals that pump the heart, the peristalsis movement of the esophagus, the uptake mechanism of calcium ion channels, the bare cadaver exposing vulnerable yet intriguing parts of the human body." --> This isn't a complete sentence. I see you're trying to drop a hint that you know your anatomy and physiology, which is great, but how can you make that flow into why you desire to be a PA? I think your conclusion is much stronger than your intro. When I think of a conclusion, I think of it as a mini summary of the paragraphs above... just giving one more "punch" of why you'd be a great PA! :P
  11. 1) When you state your emotions, use nouns like confusion, distraught, and disappointment 2) There was sudden jump from hating docs to wearing scrubs... did you become a nurse in the meantime? I think your transitions throughout can be cleaner. 3) I do begin to get a sense of your passion for compassion, keep that theme throughout :)
  12. One note I have for you is re: this statement, " Due to my quiet nature, I grew very observant of others; whatever they felt, I, too, felt it." I think being observant and having empathy are two very different things. Maybe add something about how your observations led to you become empathetic and how it'll help you clinically as a PA. I felt a bit confused after reading that statement... Otherwise, I think your conclusion is strong!
  13. Thank you, @paproof. I am relatively new to the PA forum site so I'll definitely be offering constructive criticism to others. Any comments you may have regarding my personal statement are greatly appreciated!
  14. I will never forget the phone call I received one year ago. I walked myself into an exam room, closed the door behind me, and sat down, anticipating bad news. My brother shared that my father had a diagnosis for the illness that plagued him for 9 months; esophageal cancer. As tears rolled down my cheeks, I asked myself, “Why did it take so long to get a specialist referral? Would the prognosis be different if we caught this sooner?” Although I had a feeling I wanted to pursue a career as a physician assistant (PA), my dad’s fight with cancer made it very clear that I was making the right decision. My dad was a Brazilian immigrant and english was his second language. Throughout his life, he worked odd jobs and therefore never collected a regular paycheck. It wasn’t until later that he decided to make a career change. With a part-time job and scholarship, I am proud to say that my dad financed his way through and graduated from a dental assisting program in 2014. As a recent graduate myself, I would talk to my dad on the phone about my new job in Hawaii or about the delicious food I tried at lunchtime. However, he couldn’t always relate. More often than not, my dad was complaining that he was unable to keep his meals down. At this time, I had nearly two years of health care experience (HCE), and learned to be compassionate and patient, yet to create a sense of urgency for treatment. I urged my dad to see a doctor and to discuss possible acid reflux. He quickly obtained insurance, established medical care, and was prescribed antacids. When the medications weren’t working and other diagnostic testing was unremarkable, my dad’s doctor agreed to refer him to a gastroenterologist (GI). With my dad’s insurance, the soonest a participating GI could see him was in 6 months. He took that appointment, but his condition progressively worsened. Having learned of my dad’s diagnosis, I was determined to help keep him stable. Because swallowing was difficult, I sent him protein shakes and encouraged he feed himself using his GI tube. I was trying to apply all of my knowledge that I’d accumulated working with cancer patients and geriatric patients to my dad. Although feeding was tedious, I knew he could benefit from the nutrients. If he could maintain his weight, he could be strong enough to tolerate treatment. Unfortunately, my dad continued to deteriorate. Although my dad’s diagnosis was a clarifying moment in my decision to become a PA, it wasn’t the first time I considered a career in health care. Early in college as a dance major, my priority was just that, dancing. I expected college to be easy, hadn’t developed study habits, was working two jobs, and couldn’t sit still in a lecture hall. I often frequented the Dance Injury clinic and saw different PA’s regarding my injuries. The more I understood my injuries and treatments, the more I became interested in becoming a PA. With the amount of injuries athletes sustain, I knew a career in dance was not right for me. Soon after graduation, I moved to Hawaii and began working as a medical receptionist. With no previous HCE, I believed this to be the best way to introduce myself into health care. In three short months the medical doctor (MD) recognized my potential, and promoted me to medical scribe. It was at that time that I fully submerged myself in health care. As a scribe, I have the opportunity to review medical records, prepare the MD for patient interactions, and to perform real-time charting in EMR. I have developed a valuable relationship with the doctor, and have learned things like phlebotomy that I may not have the opportunity to learn in another facility. Working in a busy family practice in Hawaii, where health care practitioners are becoming scarce, the doctor doesn’t have infinite time to spend with each patient. Therefore, I have become an extension of the doctor. My favorite of all tasks is my responsibility for patient education. I council patients on administration of medications, on recommended diet protocols, and bio-identical hormone replacement. It’s very fulfilling when the patients acknowledge the time I take to explain their treatments, answer questions, and that we form a partnership in their care. Because of my dad’s limited access to specialists, the relationships I’ve developed as a scribe, and my passion for patient education, I am determined to become a PA. Although I finalized my career goal late in college, I am currently enrolled in my final prerequisites for PA school, in which I have earned two grades of “A” thus far, all while working full-time. I have improved my time-management skills, study habits, and am eager to obtain more HCE. I believe that my experience working as an extension of the doctor will continue to prepare me for a career as a PA. I love learning and teaching, and think the collaborative nature of the PA profession will provide me with a life-long opportunity to learn and evolve.
  15. First and foremost, thank you @paadmissions for your time and dedication to this forum. I am planning to apply when applications open next month for the Class of 2019. As a first-time PA applicant, I definitely have a lot of questions and concerns about the process. Like most other PA applicants, my first questions is, “Am I a competitive applicant?” I graduated in June 2014 with a Bachelor’s of Science in Biological Sciences and a Bachelor’s of Fine Arts in Dance Performance. My cumulative GPA is 3.408 and science GPA 2.9. During my undergrad, I performed in quarterly dance performances, was chair of a non-profit organization on-campus, worked two jobs- as a peer academic advisor and a CA (Community assistant) in off-campus housing, and volunteered in a near-by Emergency Department where I earned 100 volunteer hours. It wasn’t until my Senior year of college that I decided I wanted to pursue a career in medicine rather than dance. It is evident in my transcript that once I made that switch in career goal, my science grades began to improve. Since graduating in 2014, I have been working as a Medical Scribe in a Family Practice. In addition to transcribing Doctor’s notes, I annotate lab results, take patient vitals, administer injections, send prescriptions with Doctor supervision, and assist the doctor during in-office procedures like stitch or staple-removal. I am also beginning to shadow a group of Physician’s Assistants in an orthopedic urgent care facility twice a week, and will be taking a Microbiology course and lab at a local community college beginning end of May. I am currently researching and applying for medical service trips, and hope to go on one in September 2016. I have not taken the GRE. Many schools I am interested in state they do not require the GRE. If it is not required, can a GRE score still be considered or contribute to your application as a whole? So to re-cap, am I a competitive applicant and does the GRE contribute to one’s application if it’s not required? Thank you, and I’m looking forward to your response!
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