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pa-wannabe

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About pa-wannabe

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    Physician Assistant

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  1. Interviewed with a place that does strictly RVUs, no base salary. You don't get paid for your no-show patients, cancellations, or gaps in the schedule. This position was in psychiatry, no less. Needless to say, I turned away running. One of those places that likes to throw out the word "lucrative" as a way to sell you the idea that you earn based on how hard you work.
  2. As a new grad less than a year out of school who was also looking to relocate out of state, I can confirm what you've already said about location. Every prospective employer who offered at least a telephone interview first questioned why I wanted to move to a particular area. I won't even mention the employers who I'm sure threw my resume in the trash when they saw my current residence was a six hour drive from their facility. Now, the thing about finding an out of state job is you most likely have no connections in that state, on top of your inexperience. The only jobs you will find are ones that are pretty much just looking for a licensed provider to fill a seat. RED FLAG. Often the pay is not good, the turnover is high, the mentoring is minimal, and the working environment is poor. These are the positions recruiters will push down your throat. It's up to you if you are willing to take one of these jobs for six months to a year, while you establish yourself and network to find a more suitable position. I did not want that kind of job. So I stuck to my current area to gain more experience before trying to relocate again in a year or two. On top of that, I'm psychiatry or bust, so I've limited myself to begin with. Keep your head up, but be realistic. You may have to make some sacrifices your first few years.
  3. Posted in general, but this may get more traffic and be more relevant here... I am a physician assistant practicing in psychiatry. I was recently offered, and subsequently accepted a remote behavioral health position at my organization. In this role, I am working overnight placing admission orders ONLY (yes, it's a limited role) after talking to nursing staff and the intake team by conference call. Before putting in any orders, I will call the on call psychiatrist to clear me to give these orders. Sounds straightforward and incredibly simple, right? Well, the Pennsylvania Medical Board denied my written agreement stating "not enough supervision." I am speaking with a psychiatrist by phone in regards to EVERY patient and am also required to see my supervising doc in person on a monthly basis, per my organization's requirements. Per the AMA and PSPA, there is absolutely NO REQUIREMENT for in-person supervision. The doc must simply be available by phone if he or I requests. Why is the board denying? I feel like we've stepped back in time here... Now the board is continuing to deny until they meet in person at their next monthly pow-wow. Just venting mostly, but also curious if anyone has advice.
  4. I am a physician assistant practicing in psychiatry. I was recently offered, and subsequently accepted a remote behavioral health position at my organization. In this role, I am working overnight placing admission orders ONLY (yes, it's a limited role) after talking to nursing staff and the intake team by conference call. Before putting in any orders, I will call the on call psychiatrist to clear me to give these orders. Sounds straightforward and incredibly simple, right? Well, the Pennsylvania Medical Board denied my written agreement stating "not enough supervision." I am speaking with a psychiatrist by phone in regards to EVERY patient and am also required to see my supervising doc in person on a monthly basis, per my organization's requirements. Per the AMA and PSPA, there is absolutely NO REQUIREMENT for in-person supervision. The doc must simply be available by phone if he or I requests. Why is the board denying? I feel like we've stepped back in time here... Now the board is continuing to deny until they meet in person at their next monthly pow-wow. Just venting mostly, but also curious if anyone has advice.
  5. I don't know about the show, but I'm here for the grammar. "Udder," "Ludacris," and "mute point." Carry on.
  6. Current student here. Faculty were part of the state university faculty strike last week, so they're a bit behind I'm guessing. Be patient and hang in there. I'd think by next week you'll hear something once they have a chance to get caught up.
  7. I applied on the very last day possible, and I'm a student now. Go for it.
  8. Agreed in regards to giving it a shot this year. My first time applying I had stats quite similar to yours OP (although I was two years out of college), and considered it a "test run" to get a feel for the process. And wouldn't you know it, I was accepted. You have nothing to lose (except some application fees) by applying summer of 2017. Hopefully you'll score at least one interview so you can shake out any nerves and learn first-hand what these programs are seeking in their applicants. If you aren't accepted, you can go into the following cycle already prepped for the process.
  9. Current first year student here. In an attempt to assuage any bit of anxiety I can for you and other prospective students I can tell you that quite a few applications are put on hold until December. This is neither a rejection nor a spot on the wait list. It simply means they want to conduct all their interviews and then do a "second pass" on everyone in December. Hang in there, and stay positive! :)
  10. I'm going to go with the standard answer to application questions on this forum: It depends on the school. When I was researching the requirements of my programs of interest, most explicitly stated their requirements for recommendation letters. Several schools did specify that prospective students who had been out of school for "X" number of years could substitute the academic reference requirement for one from a current employer or former supervisor of healthcare experience. When in doubt, your first action should be contacting individual programs if the requirement is not stated on their website.
  11. I had 4 Ws and a WF. Granted, none of these were in science or prerequisite courses. Got into my top choice school on the first try. Bad and/or "off" semesters happen in undergrad. Don't beat yourself up. There tend to be a lot of perfectionists going into PA school who would cringe at the thought of seeing a letter on their transcripts other than an A or (gasp!) a B. No one is perfect, and if there are schools that will overlook you for a few Ws in the past, then it's their loss. Don't misunderstand me; do everything in your power not to let any Ws happen again. Keep your hands on experience going, and definitely get a letter of recommendation from a professor in the sciences who can attest to your current performance, perhaps to help with the fact that your Ws were in sciences.
  12. It's just a small community college in Pennsylvania. As I'm sure you've seen on some other threads here, there are some bigger name schools that have biochemistry online and accept students nationwide.
  13. I just took biochemistry online this past spring, and just started my PA program a few weeks ago. There are some very dense topics that you will really need to review several times since you are essentially teaching the material to yourself. I liked my online course for the convenience, but it wasn't a required course for my program. I probably would've learned more in a classroom environment for the simple fact that some topics just didn't make sense to me when I tried to teach myself.
  14. It isn't a bad idea to take it a year before applying, especially if you have some outstanding pre-reqs and shadowing or HCE to work on yet. I think the GRE is probably one of the easier things to check off the list. Take a couple months to study and give the test your complete focus for a few weeks to make sure you're confident when you go in on test day. If you're unhappy with the results, you have a year to retake and submit your scores.
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