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pa-wannabe

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pa-wannabe last won the day on July 11

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About pa-wannabe

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    Physician Assistant

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  1. My pizza box tonight says Domino's is hiring at 15/hr. About as good as a 1099 in some cases.
  2. I think this topic has been milked for all it's worth elsewhere on this forum: https://www.physicianassistantforum.com/topic/47576-non-clinical-pa-jobs/ https://www.physicianassistantforum.com/topic/43138-non-clinical-jobs-for-pas/ https://www.physicianassistantforum.com/topic/13473-non-clinical-pa-jobs/ The list goes on...
  3. I truly hate seeing these kind of posts, because it's a reminder of how broken the healthcare system is. 1) If you were a diligent, hardworking student, which I'm going to assume you were, shame on your program for leaving you feeling unprepared. We'd do far better to have PA programs focus on turning out a few top-notch, well-prepared clinicians than throngs of programs looking to fill more seats and make more money. 2) You sound like me in many ways. I'm a sensitive person with a relatively low threshold for stress. I saw medicine as an investment with job security. Was it the right choice? Who knows. But being a thoughtful and often worrisome provider wears away at you. Find a place that can use your gifts -- you have them, whether you know it or not. 3) There is no universal provider experience. What you see, deal with, and stress over is different based on specialty, location, office setting, manager, supervising physician, and YOU! Just because ER and UC were great for someone else, doesn't make you less of a provider for not finding happiness and fulfillment there. It just means your talents have not yet found their niche. I'm only a year out of school. Knew from the jump I wanted to do psych. First job was a lot of herding patients in and out like cattle. Pill pushing. Hated it. Not what I got into medicine to do. Left after three months, don't regret it one bit. I'm now doing overnight psych admissions from home and couldn't be happier. But that happiness required me to re-evaluate what it meant to be a good PA FOR ME. You'll find your place. If you made it through school and these past few jobs, you're smart enough for it. Find your niche.
  4. Psychotic disorders? Sure, they can ask. Nobody wants a manic, paranoid, or delusional provider. But this question essentially amounts to "hey, we're going to judge your medical history and do some thought policing to determine whether or not you're planning on stopping your treatment anytime soon." Major depression, generalized anxiety, ADHD, etc? Good luck licensing enough providers to meet that healthcare shortage when half the population of providers has one of those diagnoses in his/her history. I was taught growing up to never, ever, ever, answer that question honestly when it's anything job-related. I stand by that point.
  5. Took genetics, biochem, and human development online through my local community college. I think around $500 per course back in 2015.
  6. I'm also interested in doing telepsych down the road once I have more psych experience under my belt. I think it's one of the few specialties that lends itself to virtual healthcare, but it seems the main telehealth corporations are strictly NP and MD/DO. I went so far as applying to a position only to receive an email stating they need NPs due to licensing and supervision requirements. Made my case to the recruiter for our training, scope of practice, yada, yada, yada... Sigh. Maybe one day. The clinical rat race is wearing me thin already. I'd love to see if telemed can provide some relief.
  7. THIS. If you have the knowledge in your back pocket that you will be fine financially without a job lined up next week or even next month, it's gives you all the power and confidence in these kind of corporate med (and now rural) scenarios. Sending good thoughts your way for a new and better job opportunity. Life's too short to be miserable, no matter how high the pay.
  8. I say this halfway tongue in cheek... The way I've been treated at jobs actually could have used the term "physician substitute" based on how they viewed PA/NPs -- clinicians to hire at less than half the cost of a physician with 80% of the reimbursement. No difference in patient severity between myself and the docs, but I was often seeing 24+ patients a day, while the doc was seeing 12. She refused to go from 40 minute to 20 minute visits, whereas I was hired on with that as the expectation. Two years less schooling and no residency, but expected to have the breadth and depth of knowledge of a physician even as a new grad. Just someone to usher patients in and out like cattle, collect the cash, and repeat. A cheaper "substitute." Shame.
  9. Interviewed with a place that does strictly RVUs, no base salary. You don't get paid for your no-show patients, cancellations, or gaps in the schedule. This position was in psychiatry, no less. Needless to say, I turned away running. One of those places that likes to throw out the word "lucrative" as a way to sell you the idea that you earn based on how hard you work.
  10. As a new grad less than a year out of school who was also looking to relocate out of state, I can confirm what you've already said about location. Every prospective employer who offered at least a telephone interview first questioned why I wanted to move to a particular area. I won't even mention the employers who I'm sure threw my resume in the trash when they saw my current residence was a six hour drive from their facility. Now, the thing about finding an out of state job is you most likely have no connections in that state, on top of your inexperience. The only jobs you will find are ones that are pretty much just looking for a licensed provider to fill a seat. RED FLAG. Often the pay is not good, the turnover is high, the mentoring is minimal, and the working environment is poor. These are the positions recruiters will push down your throat. It's up to you if you are willing to take one of these jobs for six months to a year, while you establish yourself and network to find a more suitable position. I did not want that kind of job. So I stuck to my current area to gain more experience before trying to relocate again in a year or two. On top of that, I'm psychiatry or bust, so I've limited myself to begin with. Keep your head up, but be realistic. You may have to make some sacrifices your first few years.
  11. Posted in general, but this may get more traffic and be more relevant here... I am a physician assistant practicing in psychiatry. I was recently offered, and subsequently accepted a remote behavioral health position at my organization. In this role, I am working overnight placing admission orders ONLY (yes, it's a limited role) after talking to nursing staff and the intake team by conference call. Before putting in any orders, I will call the on call psychiatrist to clear me to give these orders. Sounds straightforward and incredibly simple, right? Well, the Pennsylvania Medical Board denied my written agreement stating "not enough supervision." I am speaking with a psychiatrist by phone in regards to EVERY patient and am also required to see my supervising doc in person on a monthly basis, per my organization's requirements. Per the AMA and PSPA, there is absolutely NO REQUIREMENT for in-person supervision. The doc must simply be available by phone if he or I requests. Why is the board denying? I feel like we've stepped back in time here... Now the board is continuing to deny until they meet in person at their next monthly pow-wow. Just venting mostly, but also curious if anyone has advice.
  12. I am a physician assistant practicing in psychiatry. I was recently offered, and subsequently accepted a remote behavioral health position at my organization. In this role, I am working overnight placing admission orders ONLY (yes, it's a limited role) after talking to nursing staff and the intake team by conference call. Before putting in any orders, I will call the on call psychiatrist to clear me to give these orders. Sounds straightforward and incredibly simple, right? Well, the Pennsylvania Medical Board denied my written agreement stating "not enough supervision." I am speaking with a psychiatrist by phone in regards to EVERY patient and am also required to see my supervising doc in person on a monthly basis, per my organization's requirements. Per the AMA and PSPA, there is absolutely NO REQUIREMENT for in-person supervision. The doc must simply be available by phone if he or I requests. Why is the board denying? I feel like we've stepped back in time here... Now the board is continuing to deny until they meet in person at their next monthly pow-wow. Just venting mostly, but also curious if anyone has advice.
  13. I don't know about the show, but I'm here for the grammar. "Udder," "Ludacris," and "mute point." Carry on.
  14. Current student here. Faculty were part of the state university faculty strike last week, so they're a bit behind I'm guessing. Be patient and hang in there. I'd think by next week you'll hear something once they have a chance to get caught up.
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