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ddaram

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About ddaram

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    Physician Assistant

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  1. Hello Everyone!! Received the most awaited and much anticipated call from the program director Dr.Wright congratulating me on acceptance into the program. I interviewed on 1st December and I loved the staff and the students and was praying to get in to this prestigious university. my prayers are answered and will be a part of the class entering summer 2019. Thanks to everyone and all the best for all who are waiting patiently. Take care.
  2. when does the classes for 2019 admissions start? any idea folks
  3. I got an interview invite for December 1st a few minutes back. Any advice from people who got accepted or interviewed on the type of questions and writing prompt they ask. I am flying from Houston, TX on Friday the 30th. Thanks
  4. Hi friends! I just submitted my application last week. I know its late but last moment decision. I did create a merlin account but some reason my eraider account is not giving me access. so when they send out interview emails, do they send it to your personal email or to the eraider account email? Please can someone help me out with this. Thanks
  5. Thanks for the input Tracerswarner. I will rephrase my first sentence or even change it completely and see how it sounds. Thanks for the valuable advice.
  6. Thanks James for editing my statement. It sounds much better now. I will make the changes.
  7. Hi James, Sorry got busy with work. yeah i still need some input on my statement. I would really appreciate if you can have a look at it. thanks
  8. Hi! Thanks for reading my post. well i can understand your confusion but i am at that stage in life where you don't have much options. I moved to US very late in life due to family problems and going back to India is not an option. Residency is very competitive and being a very old medical graduate is a big disadvantage. so i don't want to take that path and waste couple more years, which at my age is not a wise thing. so since we have to live here, me and my wife decided we take up PA program, which by the way is very similar to what we practiced in India. my wife is a practicing PA from the past 5 years in Texas and now its my turn to go to college again..
  9. Born into a family of farmers from a small village in the southern part of India has given me a real life view of a community with significant healthcare needs but limited health care resources. I can still vividly remember the seven-year-old me rushing down to the hospital with great fear and anxiety to see my grandma, who just had a heart attack. Sitting nervously at her bedside, I watched her slowly die due to lack of proper medical care. As time went on, I lost my grandpa to diabetes, a cousin to tuberculosis, a dear friend to leukemia and my own mother to complications of pregnancy. Those tragic consecutive events of my life inspired in me the burning desire to become a doctor. I graduated from medical school with a philosophy in life - to provide health care services to the poor and underprivileged of the society. My initial 4years were spent serving rural India in the states of Chhattisgarh and Punjab as I worked in small Christian mission hospitals. These hospitals served more than three hundred villages and by establishing village health clinics, my colleagues and I were able to provide medical care for men, women, and children. We also educated them about how common preventive health principles can help them and witnessed how sensible and well-planned health care interventions can change people's lives. Working there made me understand how primary care can help decrease both morbidity and mortality resulting from heart disease, stroke, and cancer. While performing simple tests, procedures and follow-up care, we were able to lower the cost of medical care as well as hospitalizations. Working as the doctor in these mission hospitals taught me to be humble in the face of success and to be courageous in the times of adversity. The honor of being trusted to give advice in troubled times and to realize that I can't always make my patients feel better, but the opportunity to try cannot be underestimated. I wanted to go further in my medical education by studying primary care, but a call from home informing me that my dad had a stroke, changed everything. As a doctor, I was confident that I would be able to take care of him, only to realize how unprepared I was. Being a doctor and a son, I felt guilt, stress and conflicting emotions as I was providing day-to-day care for my dad. That was the first time in my life that I knew what it was like to be in the shoes of caregivers who make many sacrifices to take care of their loved ones. I have also experienced the agony of traveling to inconvenient places that were very expensive, yet lacked proper care. In those areas, I found out that the specialist doctors lacked the time required to spend with their patients due to time constraints, which in turn led to substandard care. Then, I realized there was a dire need for an effective medical facility that would provide affordable and quality care to the patients in those areas. During this time, my wife moved to the U.S to be with her parents, but I stayed back in India due to my commitments at home. While I was visiting my wife in the U.S, I had the opportunity to meet Cynthia, a physician assistant in the office where my wife worked as a medical assistant. She spent time inquiring about the present complaints while providing preventive care advice. She also monitored any existing conditions to avoid any future complications. She coordinated her work with the internist in the clinic to provide better care for her patients and I was impressed with how she and the internist made a very good team. It was not the quantity, but the quality of the care they provided that made a strong impression in our hearts (my wife and I). She reflected the type of medical practice I was looking for in India. From then on, my wife and I both decided to pursue careers as physician Assistants. Due to financial restraints and my commitments in India, I decided to let my wife join the PA program first while I provided for the family. Choosing to join PA school is not a decision that I made in haste. As a person who has practiced medicine for 10 long years in India, this decision of mine might sound unconventional and strange, but dedicating the past 2 years to do all the prerequisite courses shows my perseverance and passion towards this career. The goals and ideals of PA profession come very close to my heart as they represent my personal dedication and commitment to primary care. My life to date has prepared me to deal with various forms of obstacles and has also instilled in me the unrelenting care, determination, resilience, strength, and courage needed to help humanity. As I look towards my future as a physician assistant, I believe these characteristics will enable me to be a valuable asset to the Physician Assistant profession and the community and I am very certain that joining your prestigious institution will help me achieve my goals.
  10. Hey Kerby do you know how many from the 30 interviewed got acceptance letter? just curious. looks like only 5 seats are left for this 3rd interview on the 21st. Shrub are you coming for the interview on that day too? what are the chances?
  11. Thanks and congrats Newbie! great to know that you got accepted. Do they have the 30 minute essay thing that we have to write? how is the feedback from the current students about the program and the staff in general and the university. thanks
  12. I got an interview date for April 21st. I live in Texas. any one who had their interviews here, can you please enlighten us about the process and how many are called and how is the university in general. Thanks
  13. Born into a family of farmers from a small village in the southern part of India has given me a real life view of a community with limited health care services but significant health care needs. I still remember my own experience as a 7- year- old kid walking anxiously into the hospital where my grandma was admitted with a heart attack. Sitting nervously at her bedside, I watched her slowly die due to lack of proper medical care. In the course of time, I lost my grandpa to diabetes, a cousin to tuberculosis, a dear friend to leukemia and my own mother from complications of pregnancy. These simple yet significant events in my life have given me the inspiration to become a doctor. I graduated from medical school with a philosophy in life, to provide health care services to the poor and underprivileged sections of the society. My initial 4 years were spent working in small Christian mission hospitals serving rural India in the states of Chhattisgarh and Punjab. These hospitals served more than 300 hundred villages and by establishing village health clinics we were able to provide medical care for men, women, and children. Educating them about common preventive health principles have helped us witness first hand, how sensible and well- planned healthcare interventions can change people's lives. Working here I have witnessed how primary care can help decrease both morbidity and mortality from heart disease, stroke, and cancer. Performing simple tests, procedures and follow-up care, we were able to lower the cost of medical care as well as hospitalizations. Working as the doctor in these mission hospitals has taught me to be humble in the face of success and to be courageous while faced with adversity. The honor of being trusted to give advice in troubled times and to realize that I can’t always make my patients feel better, but the opportunity to try cannot be underestimated. I wanted to pursue further studies in primary care to gain more knowledge, but a call from home informing that my dad had a stroke, changed everything. Being a doctor I was confident that I would be able to take care of him, just to realize how unprepared I was. As a caregiver and a doctor to my dad, I had gone through the guilt and conflicting emotions and providing day-to-day and even minute-to-minute care at home was quite stressful and emotionally challenging. As a caregiver, I had an opportunity to put myself in the shoes of caregivers and the sacrifices they make while caring for their loved ones. I’ve experienced the agony of traveling to inconvenient places which were costly and yet lacked proper care. Most specialist doctors lacked the time required to spend with the patient due to time constraints which led to substandard care. It’s during this time that I realized the importance of some medical facility which is convenient, cost effective and yet provide good care for patients. During this time my wife moved to the US to be with her parents, but I stayed back in India due to my commitments at home. Once, while I was visiting my wife in the US, I had the opportunity to meet Cynthia, a physician assistant in the office where my wife worked as a medical assistant. She spent time inquiring about the present complaints while providing preventive care and also monitored any existing conditions, to avoid any future complications. She coordinated her work with the internist in the clinic to provide better care for her patients and both worked as a team. It’s not the quantity, but the quality of care she provided that made a strong impression in our heart. She reflected the type of medical practice I was looking for in India. We both decided to pursue our careers as physician assistants. Due to financial restraints and my commitments in India; I decided to let my wife join the PA program first while I provided for the family. Choosing to join PA school is not a decision which I made in haste. As a person who practiced medicine for 14 long years in India, this decision of mine might sound unconventional and strange but dedicating past 2 years to do all the prerequisite courses shows my perseverance and passion towards it. The goals and ideals of PA profession come very close to my heart as they represent my personal dedication and commitment to primary care. My life to date has prepared me to deal with many obstacles and has given me the determination; resilience, strength, and caring that are a part of my character. As I look toward my future as a physician assistant, I believe these characteristics will enable me to succeed and be a valuable asset to the profession and the community and hopefully joining your prestigious institution will help me achieve my goals.
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