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fishbum

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fishbum last won the day on May 19 2016

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About fishbum

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    Physician Assistant

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  1. I'm usually kind of surprised when something presents in the "classic" way, because it never seems that clear cut. Those presentations probably were more common when first described just because people didn't seek/get care until later in the disease process.
  2. The best advice in the history of this forum, circa 2014: "If you are on top of your game ( or want to be), find a Cts Which utilizes their PAs to do more than harvest vein/artery, and become studly" --rcdavis Insert whatever specialty you want and it works. Point being, excellence isn't the kind of thing that goes unnoticed for long and as corny as it sounds, I do think that you can overcome a whole lot of "politics" by being a badass.
  3. I think the point is that there are legitimate functions of government, and that public health is one of them.
  4. If you want acuity, then obviously the ICU is the place to be. But if you're wanting autonomy, it's more difficult to find in critical care. Certainly there are exceptions (rural areas, overnight cross coverage, etc) but you should generally expect to have more attending involvement in the ICU vs. ED. I do lots of tubes and lines, but sometimes I think it would be nice to work up and dispo a patient without anyone else signing off on my work.
  5. To further muddy the waters, our hospital system has a "nurse residency" program for new RNs. Basically training in a particular unit as far as I'm aware.
  6. I've seen a few jobs advertised in ped. cards, ped. ED/UC, but not in ped derm. There's a smaller pool of specialty jobs for kids just because kids don't need specialists as much as adults do. It's been said a million times on the forum here (because it's very true) that you may well change your mind about what you want to do once you get into clinical year. You might love kids but not be able to handle the chaos that is your average pediatric office. Once you figure out what you really want to do, the money is a secondary concern.
  7. A few thoughts: I think all of that extra education and training should make the BC emergency physician more capable of weighing all pertinent data and making a rational determination in a patient who could-but-almost-certainly-doesn't have a serious medical problem. In fact, from what I've seen, that's what really separates great EM clinicians from all of the rest. Anybody can work-up everything to the max and anybody can hunt down a reason to admit a patient "just in case". I agree that how we look isn't the important thing, but it does matter. It seems like a lot of the problems we have with "non-compliant" patients is related to mistrust in providers. One could make the case that the doc fostered some mistrust in medical providers, particularly the non-physician variety. I worked in family medicine for a few months after graduation in an office without a physician. It was challenging in the way that primary care tends to be. I had SP support when I needed it and got some feedback from chart review. I left and went into a specialty to do the cool, high-speed sort of stuff that you don't do in family medicine. Now, a physician sees all of my patients in the hospital and my new patients in the office. Some physicians want to see the follow-ups and sick visits too. On more than one occasion, I've had my care plan changed from demonstrably evidence-based to inappropriate, always in the name of "just in case". I do love the medicine in acute care, but it gets old knowing that doing your job well might not really matter in the end, depending on what your doc wants to do on any given day. I love working on a team with physicians. But I hate being thought of, treated like, feeling like, and--ultimately--, being an assistant. Sorry for the hijack, OP. I'm just feeling your pain on this one...and hoping it gets better for you.
  8. I majored in emergency medical care at Western Carolina University. You can try these too: https://www.naemt.org/about-ems/degrees-in-ems
  9. I was pretty much in your exact same spot when I decided to become a PA. Had very, very little college credit since my EMT and paramedic courses weren't academic courses. As said above, this is actually a pretty good spot to be in. You can choose a course of study that makes the most sense and wastes the least amount of time/money (though there will be some redundancy). There are a few EMS bachelor's degrees out there. The one I did was designed to be pre-med, so most of my pre-requsites were part of the program. Best of all, you can focus on getting great grades from the start.
  10. https://www.amazon.com/Primary-Care-Medicine-Evaluation-Management/dp/1451151497
  11. In my experience, this is one hundred million percent not true. The physicians I work with have the same opportunity for work/life balance as the PAs do. We get to work at the same time and leave at the same time. But when they leave, they do it in much nicer cars and go to a much bigger houses. Work life balance has a whole lot more to do with specialty than credentials as far as I can tell.
  12. I got the FELS grant and I think it's great. Jobs aren't that hard to come by in most of NC unless you're being way too picky. And the worst case scenario is that you get some great job out of state and have to pay it back. Which is exactly what you'd have to do if you rolled that amount into your regular loans. Pro tip: find out when the application opens and make a reminder on your calendar. I'm pretty sure the grants are first-come first-served.
  13. I think most people do emails, but I did brief handwritten thank you notes individually to the faculty I interviewed with personally as well as the program director and the admissions coordinator. It took a bit longer, but I only applied to one program so it wasn't too bad.
  14. Pitt Community College in NC has offered online genetics in the past. Not sure if they still do.
  15. I took all of my prerequisites online with the exception of o. chem, applied to one school and got in.
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