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Convertable

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About Convertable

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  1. Well, it really comes down to what opens up for me. I can't afford to wait for an EMT job and push back application by a year if I can't find one. I can always return to Pharmacy Tech so I'm currently employed in a healthcare role. I have various volunteer work that has patient exposure as well, and realistically the learning curve on IFT isn't that steep. That is, I won't be at some serious disadvantage because I didn't do a year of IFT. *shrugs* The HCE is the trickiest part, but I am going to take what I can get and get the ball rolling on applying to PA schools.
  2. Thanks EMEDPA. Yes I'm all about getting a tech position, but it's hard without experience. I don't list my pharmacy tech work on my resume (it's so long so!) so I am thinking of switching it up and seeing what comes of it. A minor setback. Will stay the course with EMT.
  3. Thanks @rev ronin. Those were my gut-reactions. I have a lot of experience with insurance companies in my previous career, and I'm well aware of that aspect of it, and while it's less than ideal, I can deal with that. Just need a modicum of professionalism/safety overall. I won't participate in outright thievery. BTW, I've read your posts and been encouraged by your experience as a career changer and advice to others.
  4. I don't think PA is saturated like pharmacy is. It really is something entirely different. Not sure how rankings have to do with "PA saturation". Isn't that more of a supply vs. demand situation? So far, the supply appears to be keeping pace with the demand. Sure, we'd all like for every applicant to have 10 openings, but that's just not the way the free market works, and patient outcomes would be adversely affected. Doctors are dealing with so-called "midlevel encroachment" because they have artificially restricted supply. (Granted, private schools tend to lower standards and artificially inflate supply. See, eg., law schools and pharmacy schools. Hasn't happened yet to PA schools, but beware the precedent. It is always a worry.)
  5. Hello everyone! So in pursuit of attaining HCE for PA school, I recently became a NREMT. I got my first job soon after with an IFT private EMS company that turned out to be quite shady. Not to get to into it, but coming from prior career, I have an expectation of professionalism and was appalled at the sanitary and safety conditions of the equipment, and the constant flirtation with MediCare fraud. Needless to say, I resigned very quickly and am looking for something else. Which brings me to a question. I have 5 years experience as a Pharmacy Technician. This was while I was in high school and then during college. I was quite good at it, and enjoyed the fast paced environment and managed to learn a lot about medication and disease. In looking around at some of the schools I'd like to apply to next year, I noticed they accept Pharmacy Tech experience as HCE. Seeing as I learned more doing Pharmacy Tech than I believe I would learn doing simple Interfacility Transport ambulance work . . . . 1) Would pharmacy tech work be better? and 2) Is my experience of 5 years as a Pharmacy Tech too old? (This was 15-10 years ago before my big office-based career). Thanks for any input, I really appreciate it.
  6. It's difficult to understand at your age (I remember !), but the route is much less important than the destination. That is, decide which is right for you and worry less about the route. If you hate being an NP, the fact that you could work as an RN for a few years will be small comfort. Your career will last much much longer than the pathway you take to reach it.
  7. You should definitely go nurse, or learn the difference between "then" and "than" before applying PA. But seriously, you should search this topic. It's been done a lot. Boiling it down: schools don't require much HCE anymore for PA. You can also get into a PA program for freshman in college that is direct entry (will have to poke around to find these, but they exist). That option is a good one for someone in your shoes I would think.
  8. Okay! Alright, guess I'll relax and stick to the plan. Like the PA education model more anyway.
  9. Great info! So turns out I looked into the NP track around here (Texas), and there's only one direct entry program, which only allows mental health track. So the Accelerated BSN-RN, work 2 years, 2 years NP school seems like a long time (might as well do medical school), whereas there are 5 PA schools, 2 years + 1 year residency, would be more efficient. Guess I'll take my chances.
  10. 16,000 is nothing to sneeze at. That said, what about job availability in general. I'm obviously willing to take a pay cut for being in the Bay Area, since it's an employers market there.
  11. Hey all, just wanted some feedback on whether being an NP is a better career decision than PA for someone who is, for whatever reason, dead set on being in Bay Area. I read another thread here on the topic, and it seems that is the consensus. Just want additional feedback because the last thing I want to do is hem myself into a path where I cannot find a job in my desired locale. (sorry, rural is not for me and my family). Also, I'm interested in ICU / critical care / hospitalist work, if that makes a difference. Any one have information on this?
  12. I have worked with drug-dependent patients and am very good friends with an addiction psychiatrist who is conducting research on some cutting edge therapies for narcotic dependency. Really exciting stuff. For now, methadone and Suboxone are far from ideal, sure, but they are better than death, which is the likely result if patients are not transitioned to them. For reasons still unknown, some patients are able to kick the habit while others are not. Socio-psychological factors are often at play. We have a lot to learn, and I hope the future holds better treatments for these patients. In the time being, harm reduction is important. These patients can be difficult, to say the least, and I applaud anyone who devotes his or her time to helping this population.
  13. Really disheartened by the responses here. Drug addiction is a medical issue, and while you may not be "called" to help with the problem, refusing access to suboxone literally kills people. Study after study after study has shown that a therapeutic approach, like that employed in parts of Europe, has much better outcomes both in terms of saving lives from OD's and in actually rehabilitating drug-dependent patients. Keep in mind that many people who are opioid dependent were given their first dose from a healthcare provider that they trusted, only to be thrown to the wolves of withdrawal (or worse) by those who would classify them as a drug-seeker. Suboxone saves lives. That is the heart of it. I hope that the next generation of PA's has more compassion than the opinions of those in this thread.
  14. Hello! I have a quick question, really. I dropped out of a rigorous, prestigious professional program (top 5 law) about 10 years ago. I was in my third year, there, and have my reasons, which I don't want to go into on a public forum, but I'm just curious how this is perceived, and is this going to sink my chances if my stats GPA, HCE, GRE are stellar otherwise. Thank you!
  15. Wow that's really great. So excited about starting down this path. Thanks again.
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