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steakPA

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About steakPA

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    Physician Assistant Student

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  1. steakPA

    Lock Haven Or Seton Hall?

    not sure specifically about any of these schools, but I can say that ranking doesn't really matter during or after PA school. I am 3 months shy of finishing didactic and knowing what I know now, I would chose the school that gets you done quickly for the least amount of money, but also has a good reputation/pass rates/curriculum that will prepare you well for rotations. I imagine the 33 month program is the same amount of credits just stretched out into 33 months. You could be in practice almost a year earlier in a 24 month program. If rotations spread around the country is something you'd like to do, then go for it. But the cost you will incur jumping from place to place every month could potentially be significant unless you live in AHEC housing. In my opinion, quality rotation sites are more important than proximity (if I had to choose between the two). Good luck!
  2. As others have said above, medicaid is an option. You have to make above a certain amount (I think 12k) to qualify for subsidies under ACA, otherwise you have to pay full price for a crappy plan. So ACA was not an option for me. Although it seems expensive, I recommend going with the school plan. Mine is about $220/month but if I go through the health center, all visits and medications are covered (everything except brand name stuff is available there). I think it should be similar with other schools. Bottom line - take a loss on this one and go for the convenience of school insurance if you can.
  3. you have at least 4-5 months. why not retake the GRE? like others have said, its more likely to rule you out if they have a cut off for GRE (which from what I remember tends to be 300). If anything, I think the low number of PCE would be more to your detriment. Also in reference to your previous question - they don't look at your age whenever evaluating your PCE. Hours are hours whether you're 40+ (at least 10% of my class) or 22.
  4. currently a student 4 months in. If I could go back, I would've saved myself a TON of money. -apply early -as many others have mentioned, don't apply to schools you wouldn't actually attend. One school I applied to literally sent their students all over the USA for each rotation (so you would be moving every four weeks). While this might work for some students, it definitely would not have worked for me. I could have saved a lot of $$ being more selective and learning more about schools. -make the most out of your pre-PA school health care experience and the providers that surround you. if they enjoy teaching, pick their brain for knowledge! it will help you tremendously in the long run. more for post acceptance and PA school in general.... -when you get in - just relax. seriously. no amount of reading or studying is going to prepare you for this. take a vacation. spend time doing things you enjoy. -during school, take time for yourself! i cannot say this enough. you won't be able to study effectively if you don't take this time. i have a habit of declining doing fun activities to study. our class does bootcamp on mondays and basketball on thursdays - such a stress reliever! it's nice to have fun with your classmates outside of the classroom that you sit in ALL DAY LONG (we stay in the same room so it's basically a second home) these tips have all been discussed before, but hide sight is 20/20 :)
  5. I second the above. As an Ophthalmics tech, I was hands on with patients daily which is really what most places are looking for. I had no problem with any of the schools I applied to (all within NC and SC) accepting my experiences as it was definitely hands on with patients. If you’re paired with a physician who likes to teach (as I was), you have the potential to learn more than working as a CNA.
  6. I am a current student at Campbell. The first day, there are definitely a few prayers from different faculty/university members. There are also s few ceremonies during the year where prayer is involved. Otherwise, we do not pray before class or anything like that. Our genetics class was more geared towards different research being done currently and how it might impact treatments in the future. Also, we ended the genetics class with ethical debates that could definitely have had some religious talk intertwined but did not. All classes are kept strictly science. Overall - I am not much of a religious person but if you can get past the few prayers on opening day and at ceremonies then you are good to go. Attending Campbell was by far the best decision I’ve ever made. I don’t exaggerate when I say your classmates here truly become your family!
  7. I bought the first edition and received it a few days before I saw this post. Bought the second edition and sent the first back. I feel that it's much more in depth. Just browsing through it, the organization of the text is much better in the second edition as well.
  8. steakPA

    Ophthalmic PAs?

    not an ophthalmic PA, but I am starting PA school in July and currently work as a scribe/tech/surgical coordinator in a small private office. I have talked in detail about this with my physician (he primarily does cataracts and blephs). It seems like a PA would be best implemented in a practice that does a lot of surgeries to do a review of systems and regular exam prior to surgery. There are very few ophthal PAs out there, but it seems like most of them work with the bigger practices and function similarly to an OD (except add the ability to surgical assist but most procedures don't need multiple hands). Personally, I love the field and would enjoy practicing in it. I don't really enjoy refracting but I could foresee myself getting stuck doing refraction after refraction and routine exams all. day. long. and less procedural/complex stuff. I did read of a PA who went into ophthalmology and did a month+ long training course to learn the basics (slit lamp, etc.). I hope ophthalmic PAs become more prevalent soon!
  9. steakPA

    2016-2017 application cycle

    I interviewed back in August and was waitlisted, but got a phone call today that I was accepted off the wait list! I have already accepted a position at another school, so I denied the acceptance. Hopefully someone here will accepted from the wait list! Good luck.
  10. Hi everyone! Congrats to everyone who has received an acceptance so far. I interviewed on August 23rd and heard back for an acceptance on August 24th! I'm very excited to be joining this class and was wondering if there was any facebook groups or anything set up for those who were accepted. Thanks!
  11. The interview is individually. Don't be nervous! The staff is incredibly nice and welcoming and it's evident that they have all worked very diligently to prepare a great program for their future students. Once you get there, all the nerves will fade (hopefully)!
  12. Hi everyone! I was part of the August 5th interview group as well. I thought the faculty and staff were very knowledgeable about starting up a new program and was very impressed with the program they have put together. Everyone was very welcoming and accommodating. They say we will know within four weeks, hopefully sooner! They were pretty quick to invite after supplemental applications.
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