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Strohmboli

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About Strohmboli

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  1. Right, so what then would the roll of a PA be in a pathology setting? I understand that there is anatomical path vs forensic path but I don't know where the PA roll fits in to this specialty
  2. Hey guys, I saw one post about this from 6 years ago and didn't know if there have been any updates... Are there many PA's (not Pathology Assistants but Physician Assistants) that work in the field of pathology? I just had the opportunity to tour the Pathology/Microbiology Dept at the hospital that I work at with, and I pretty much had a nerd-gasm. If so, I'm just wondering what the job would entail for a Physician Assistant in Pathology. Seems like the Pathologists we encountered spent a lot of solo time looking at scopes.
  3. That's a huge reason why I'm going PA and not MD. Not that docs aren't around for their kids, but in my experience, PAs seem to have better work life balance. My dad wasn't around when I was young... I'm a product of an affair and he didn't care to leave his family to be around... so being there for my kids milestones is a huge priority for me
  4. Before I read this whole thread, I'd just like to say thanks for starting this. I actually avoided the forum for a span of 3ish months because of the general negativity that is rampant in these posts. The pre-pa section is full of disappointing posts about not being good enough to get in and the arrogance of those with good GPAs. The Professional PA section, while entertaining and educational, seems full of people bitching about the career they chose (a 2 year masters that pays them close to 6 figures). I fully understand the negatives that go into being a PA, and a medical provider in general, but a little perspective is always good. So thank you
  5. I'm a ER tech and came in to work on a day off to check schedule, talk to dept. mgr, etc. I had scrubs on bottom and a patagonia pull over on top... I quickly stepped into a room to help FD transfer a possible stroke patient to our bed as no other Techs/nurses were in there yet. Neuro came in as we finished transferring the patient and thought I was the ED resident taking care of the patient, presumably due to my age (mid 20s), gender (male) and my stereotypical ER Resident dress. He was surprised to learn that not only was I not a MD, I wasn't even working at the moment, just lending a quick hand.
  6. I'm in the same boat, just fighting my way back to program minimum cGPA. A lot of schools actually do holistic reviews, too. My advice is just keep pounding away at classes and start doing research on schools, specifically those that have lower or no minimum GPA requirements. You'll be surprised- Duke, OHSU, Pacific, Utah, Missouri State etc
  7. Also, "Animal behavior" counts as science but "Human Behavior" doesn't? Totally makes sense....
  8. Ok I see that now, thanks. I guess my question still stands-take my class behavioral neuroscience for example. In the class title is "Neuroscience" so based on that chart I'd assume that it's included in the science GPA. However, it's really more of a behavioral science class based on content... so... It's up to CASPAs discretion?
  9. Yeah, I'd echo what everyone is saying- seems like your app either has to have a great GPA (3.7+) or Great HCE (4k minimum in Good quality positions). The most competitive apps have both. As it stands, right now you have neither. Don't give up hope. You can take night class to get your EMT or CNA in one semester and start accruing HCE while in school. I'm a full time student and work full time as a ER Tech. It's tough but it's short term. Good luck mate.
  10. Hey guys, I couldn't find this answer of the CASPA page or in the archives here...I apologize if this is a repost... I'm trying to calculate my science GPA for CASPA- I know that the traditional sciences are included (like biology, chem, and physics), and I've read that any medical training (my EMT class for instance) is also included. However, I wasn't sure about Neuroscience classes. I'm a double major in Bio and Neuroscience and thus many of my classes full under 'Neuroscience'. Many of these classes are offered under the "psych" department (i.e. Behavioral Neuroscience is PSYC4340) although some are offered through the biology dept. Will any of these Neuro classes count towards my science GPA? It seems logical that they should being that they are neuroSCIENCE classes, but as well all know CASPA isn't always logical. Thanks for any input. Boli
  11. Hey, I was wondering about the GRE, specifically what constitutes a "competitive" score. I took the GRE last Thursday and just received my scores...159V(83%) 154Q(56%) [313 total] 4.5W (80%). I'm not sure how these scores stack up. In addition, assuming these are competitive, how much weight does a good GRE score have? Will it surpass lackluster early GPA woes? Or is it viewed more like a bar you have to meet the minimum and beyond that is meaningless?
  12. Yeah, I think this is the general trend with some schools, probably the majority of schools. I guess my intention with this tread was less of a pity party for me, but more so for people to bring forth schools that they knew looked at people as a whole package and not just "stats". If you exclude the first 40 credits on my college transcript I have a 3.65 cum and science GPA goes up to around 3.75 too. I'm a double major in Biology and Neuroscience with 2 minors (chem and psych). I'll have close to 7k hours of HCE, 4k of which is HIGH QUALITY IMO- I'm dealing with GSWs, stabbings, major MVC, multi system traumas in addition to the STEMIs, strokes, and all the other things that happen in a level 1 trauma center/ inner city ER... My LORs are going to be exceptional due to the relationships I've fostered with providers and one professor for whom I TA in anatomy. As Far as my narrative, I'm obviously planning on writing the pants off of that thing and have already been drafting a close to final draft.... Obviously I can't pretend those bad classes didn't happen tho, so I'm looking for people to help me find some schools that they know look at people as a agglutination of Stats, HCE, LOR, life experience etc. not just, as you mentioned, some schools: "Oh you don't have a 3.7 cGPA, kindly gtfo of here with that weak app". Sorry for the word vomit, it's just frustrating to see people who are "22yo, 400 hours HCE as a MA over the summers, 3.3cGPA, 3.5sGPA 305GRE" getting into schools and I feel like I can't sniff an interview rn despite my accolades and accomplishments....All due to choices I made 8 years ago as an 18year old kid- the neuroscientist in me wants to blame my underdeveloped prefrontal cortex and hypersensitive limbic system at that age but the reality is I screwed up and now am watching people with weaker applications and less HCE get in to schools sole because their cumGPA is a little higher. I'm not taking anything away from these people, as I'm sure plenty will be great PAs, but it's undoubtedly frustrating when I know I'd be a kickass addition to a school
  13. Good looking out! I forgot about Utah. Seems like the "West coast" is more flexible? Maybe just a small sample size so far...
  14. At the time of applying next year I'll have around 4k hours as ER tech/ EMT-B in Level 1 Trauma Center/ED, and 2000+ hours as scheduler/clerical position in private practice GI. I know some schools don't consider the clerical work, although I did work directly with patients to go over medical hx etc... On top of that the usual 100-125 hours shadowing, 300 hours-ish volunteering with medical org
  15. Hey guys, so I know there are a lot of fragmented threads that say X school or Y school look at applicants more holistically as opposed to putting so much weight on GPA, but I wanted to get a cumulative listing (with help from the community) of schools that in your experience look at applicants with GPA less in mind. I screwed up early in college so my cum GPA is on the low end for applying and I am kinda in a rut with what schools I should even look at... One thing I've seemed to run into is although Pacific U states they only look at the last 45 credits etc, they have really high GPA standards. Looking for schools that aren't like that. I believe I'm a great applicant, my cum GPA just isn't stellar...looking at right around a 2.9- 3.0 at best....however, my science GPA is 3.4ish and general pre req GPA is 3.6+. in my understanding Idaho St, Duke, MEDEX and Touro are examples of schools that put less emphasis on GPA. Do you know any others?
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