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nguim21

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About nguim21

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  1. I love you intro! I think you do a great job in the beginning, but then get more into resume mode in the middle/end. Keep going with your story and your experience in the hospital with the patient. Great job painting the picture!
  2. Exhausted, I looked up to see the 17th mile marker of the Twin Cities Marathon. I could barely place one foot in front of the other, let alone pick up the pace as I could tell I was slowing down. I rounded the corner to cross over the Mississippi River and thought “There’s no way I can keep running up this hill to get over the bridge….I’ve got to stop.” My legs felt like I had 20 pound weights on them and I began to sink my chin down into my chest. At that moment, I caught a glimpse of my dad’s smile on a picture I had pinned to my Leukemia and Lymphoma Society Team in Training jersey. Tears rolled down my face as I came to realize how much I had grown emotionally in the past 10 years to get to this place. Ten years prior, I experienced death for the first time: I walked into the hospital room and immediately ran over to the bed. I placed my warm hand on his cold, clammy hand. I just squeezed. I then laid my head on his chest and looked up at the machines. They were no longer beeping and flashing; they were silent. The room was deafeningly quiet as I pressed my face into his chest hoping, praying and wishing I would hear something…anything. It was then that I knew he was gone. The Leukemia had finally won. As I pushed myself to run faster and keep my head up, I clutched the picture of my dad and reminisced about the care he received and the ups and downs we as a family experienced during his treatment. What struck me and continues to resonate in my mind is the personalized, caring and straightforward care he received during treatment by the nurses and by his physician, Dr. Bender. She would eagerly walk into the room with a smile on her face and a gentle look in her eyes, no matter what the news was that she had to share. She always took into account activities of my siblings and me and excitedly asked us how our swim meets or hockey games went. She was a rock-solid foundation for my family throughout the time my dad spent in the hospital. The compassion she had for her patients was undeniable and the empathy she expressed made the days better. What kept me running further and further up Summit Avenue in St. Paul, MN that day was the nostalgic memories of the exceptional care I was able to witness. As I crossed the finish line, I was overcome with relief and gratitude that I was able to come full-circle ten years after losing my dad to Leukemia to now raising over $5,000 for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society as I completed the Twin Cities Marathon in his memory. Two years after running the marathon, I started my career as a pharmaceutical sales representative. For 8 years, I’ve had the opportunity to see the various clinical settings that Physician Assistants, Doctors and Nurse Practitioners work in. I have been able to work closely with providers to give patients the best care possible and have been privileged to assist in adjusting treatments and suggesting alternatives to help patients reach the best clinical outcomes for their specific disease. During my tenure as a representative, I have been blessed to shadow multiple providers. The most memorable was shadowing Jennifer Dwyer, a Physician Assistant who allowed me to accompany her in the rural health clinic she serves in. It was then that I witnessed her exceptional care which reminded me of the care my dad received by Dr. Bender in the hospital. One particular patient she was seeing was there as a follow up to a recent hospital stay. The patient was a young woman who had struggled for years with multiple psychiatric conditions and was recently hospitalized as a result of her struggles. From the moment we walked into the room, to the moment we de-briefed about the patient, I saw that Jennifer truly cared about the woman. She was compassionate and understanding. Despite her jam-packed clinical schedule, Jennifer took the time to carefully address the patient’s fears and concerns about being admitted to an in-patient treatment center. She also made sure the patient had support outside of the medical field so she could make the most out of helping herself get healthy again. As Jennifer walked out of the room, I was astonished that despite the current pressures on providers to perform and see as many patients as possible, she was able to give her patient the care that my dad’s providers gave him. The serenity and peace that can ease the mind of a patient or family in a time of difficulty is something I desire to provide. Since my first encounter shadowing a doctor, I’ve had a yearning to get closer to direct patient care. After witnessing Jennifer’s care practices, I want to deliver the compassionate care that Dr. Bender and Jennifer Dwyer provided.
  3. I think you should grab the readers attention with your line...a receipt lay beside him. It will get people to want to know what the receipt was about and who the person was. Also, what happened to him. I know it's personal, but if you're going to use it...state what happened (whichever way it turned out) and maybe elaborate more on how this drove you to serve others/help others and choose one example that stands out in your mind. Everyone's volunteered, everyone's got experience, what sets yours apart? Just a few thoughts.
  4. I thnk if you provide just 1 or 2 examples of why you would enjoy being a PA, or how your recent position helping the doc would closely mimic being a PA would be more substantial. Also, your opening statement doesn't grab the reader in...maybe start off with one example of how you were "knee-deep" in patient care and what you did and relate that to how you want to be a PA.
  5. Exhausted, I looked up to see the 17th mile marker of the Twin Cities Marathon. I could barely place on foot in front of the other, let along pick up the pace, as I could tell I was slowing down. I rounded the corner to cross over the Missisippi River and thought "there's no way I can keep running up this hill to get over the bridge....I've got to stop". My legs felt like I had 20 pound weights on them and I began to sink my chin down into my chest. At that moment, I caught a glimpse of a picture of my dad that I had pinned to my jersey....It was then that I began to cry as I realized how much suffering had happened in the past 10 years to get me to this place. Ten years prior, I experienced death for the first time: I walked into the sterile hospital room and immediately ran over to the bed. I placed my warm, sweatyhand on his clammy hand and just squeezed. I then laid my head on his chest and look up at all the machines. They were no longer beeping and flashing; they were silent. The room was quiet as I pressed my face into his chest hoping, praying and wishing I would feel something, anything. It was then that I knew he was gone. My dad, my jolly-go-lucky, bear-hug giving, smiley-guy dad had gone to heaven. He had succumb to the Leukemia Dr. Gail Bender had diagnosed him with 8 months prior. As I pushed myself to run faster and keep my head up, I clutched the picture of my dad and reminisced about the care he received and the ups and downs my family and I experienced during his treatment. What stood out the most, and what continues to stand out the most is the personal, humane and forthright care he received during treatment byt he nurses and by his main doctor, Dr. Bender. She would eagerly walk into the room with a smile on her face and a gently look in her eyes, no matter what the news was that she had to share. she always took into account the comings and going of my siblings and me and excitedly asked us how our swim meets or hockey games went. She was a solid-rock foundation for my family throughout the emotionally-draining time my dad spent int he hospital. THe compassion she had for her patients was undeniable and the empathy she expressed mad ethe days not so bad. As a pharmaceutical sales representative, I've had the opportunity to witness multiple clinical settings for the last 8 years. I have been able to work closely with providers to give patients the best care possible and have had the ability to assist in adjusting treatments and suggesting alternatives to help patients reach the best clinical outcomes for their specific disease. During my tenure as a representative, I have been bleseed to shadow multiple providers, and the most memorabl ewas shadowing a cardiologist. Dr. Mahowald allowed me to shadow him in the hospital and it was there that I was able to witness his exceptional care and his ability to emulate the care my dad received by Dr. Bender in the hospital. One particular patient he was trating needed a pace maker. We met with the patient in the cath lab waiting are and then proceeded to get scrubbed-in in order to perform the procedure. Dr. Mahowald allowed me to stand to the left of him and to the left side of the 76-year-old grandma who was about to become a great-grandma. she lay on the table under general anesthesia as the doctor cut open her chest and placed the pacemaker int he cavity. After hooking up the leads and adjusting the settings, it was time to allow the device to do its job. As Dr. Mahowald stepped away from the operating table, the PA stepped in to finish suturing the patient. It was at this moment that I realized how closely the providers were to performaing faith-based healing here on earth. It was undeniably amazing! Since that day, I've had a yearning to get closer to direct patient care. I want to be able to deliver the compassionate care that Dr. Bender and Dr. Mahowald delivered.
  6. Make sure you are using correct tenses...did vs. do, saw vs. see...etc. What was it about your husband's death was so hard (seeing the future slip away, watching him suffer, thinking about how you'd move forward? "while caring for 3 patients...." what about that made you "know you had to go back to medicine"? It's good, but needs some tidying-up, as well as some grammatical corrections! Nice work!
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