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ddulek06

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About ddulek06

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  1. I got an update via email tonight, makes me both optimistic about hopefully getting an interview. Anyone else recieve this. Thank you for your continued interest in Augsburg College's PA Program! I wanted to reach out to you to update you on our current admission process. Your file has been received by our program and remains active for our consideration. I hope to contact you within the next 2-4 weeks with additional information regarding the status of your application. Please contact me if you have any further questions. Thank you, Jackie
  2. Thank you all for the feedback, I was able to make some meaningful changes that really improved my essay. Thank you for honest criticism.
  3. This is my second year applying and I feel last year I reiterated my resume too much. Here is what I currently have. Any thoughtful feedback would be very helpful. While drastically different from my previous essay (this year and last year) I am still not sure I am on the right path. Thank you for your thoughts. It was 3:00am when the pager buzzed, and jolted me from the lull of an empty Emergency Department. My heart began to race as the text page began to scroll across the pager. A rush of adrenaline brought me back to reality, and I carefully prepared for the upcoming controlled chaos. Despite performing phlebotomy for many years, this was the first time I needed to perform in a critical situation. My stomach was uneasy, and I could feel sweat beginning to form on my brow. The ominous cadence of the gurney steadily increased as the ambulance staff rounded the corner for room 18. Insecurity, doubts, and fear crept into my consciousness. The ambulance staff wheeled the patient into room 18 and a fury of activity ensued. Briefly stunned by the situation and commotion I took a second to regain my composure. Once present, I realized I had a job to do and took my place amongst the team. The patient’s skin felt cold and clammy to the touch, and his face appeared lifeless. Despite the chaos of activity around me I was able to collect the blood samples I needed. Feelings of helplessness and disappointment surged as I had to leave the patient side to return to the laboratory run a gamut of tests. A burning desire to care for and treat patients was ignited inside me. This desire to help people is what eventually led me down the road of becoming a Physician Assistant (PA). My road began in a quaint town in Minnesota, where I spent my childhood. Rolling hills and the mighty Mississippi River dominated the landscape, and livestock outnumbered people 10 to 1. Lacking a healthcare facility, my family like many in rural communities, had to commute to receive our care. This problem is not unique to my childhood home, and throughout the country there is an increasing need for primary care providers. The shortage is driving change within the healthcare system, and PAs are increasingly used to bridge the gap in care. There are many reasons why I want to become a PA, but providing care to a community in need similar to one I grew up in would be immensely rewarding. Entering college with the intentions of becoming a Registered Nurse, a blessing in disguise altered my path and I eventually discovered the Medical Laboratory Scientist (MLS) program. I became fascinated with all things laboratory related, and found my niche it clinical chemistry. My current career, as a Technical Specialist, in many ways mirrors the ever-changing role a PAs play in the healthcare team. At times I am a leader acting as a role model and making challenging decisions that affect the care and treatment of the patients we serve. Other times I need to be a team member and perform routine tasks. When really complex issues arise I need to seek advice from our Directors utilizing their experience taking the opportunity to learn something new for when a similar situation may arise. The maturity to recognize when consultation is required, and being able to differentiate situations that do not will be a priceless tool as a practicing PA. In college one semester was riddle with lost and personal challenges. At the time I lacked the emotional maturity to handle the situation effectively and my grades reflect this. Since then my maturity has grown, and subsequent and similar challenges were faced with better resolve and results. My greatest accomplishment in recent years has been facing my troubled past with alcohol, and making the required changes to live a substance free life, which I have been doing for the last three years. My life took on new meaning when I met my fiance. She helped mold me into the person I always wanted to be, and I am thankful to have her full support on pursuing my dream of becoming a PA. Willingly filling the shoes his father abandoned, I have entered the role of parent for her eight year-old son Jaidyn. The satisfaction of becoming a parent is like nothing I experienced before, and while challenging at times I am proud to call Jaidyn my son. For them, I am motivated to better myself and become the best husband and father I can possibly be. To my dismay I never knew what happen to the patient in room 18, and while my work as a MLS provides invaluable information to care providers I desire to step into a different role. I would rather interpret patient test results instead of resulting them, and diagnose people instead of instruments. I miss the impact a warm smile, and caring gestures can do to a person struggling with an illness. Countless hours have been spent pondering the direction my life could take, but I always come back to wanting to become a PA. I am dedicated and motivated to start a new journey to become a PA, and feel prepared to overcome the inevitable obstacles that will be faced while training to become a PA.
  4. Hello, I am looking at applying through the Track I. I am wondering how others have went about finding a preceptor? I currently work through Mayo Clinic and they are not willing to host UND students due to the 1 year long preceptor requirement. Is anyone aware of any healthcare systems in MN that other UND students have found preceptors at? Thank You, Derek
  5. Hello, I am looking at apply to the UND program and I am seeing if I could potentially find a MD/PA that would be willing to serve as a clinical preceptor. I am open to any location in MN, and would ideally like to find a rural site that would potentially serve as my clinical site, and be looking to hire a PA following my completion. I bring a solid foundation in laboratory medicine. I am extremely hard working and dedicated to becoming a PA. Derek
  6. As a front line laboratory professional I was introduced to the triumphs, challenges, and heartache that come with a healthcare career. However, as a result, I developed the ability to relate to, communicate with, and put people at ease while I performed an often stressful procedure. These interactions and relationships drew me to the Physician Assistant (PA) profession. While working as a phlebotomist I meet and develop a meaningful relationship with Anna. She was a seven-year-old girl diagnosed with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. Anna had large stunning eyes that did not tell the tale of disease, pain, or suffering but instead radiated innocence and hope. My professionalism set Anna’s mother at ease, and it was often evident that this diagnosis took its toll on her just as much as her daughter. I noticed the Disney character on Anna’s shirt and started asking her about the movie. Anna thought I was silly, and failed to notice anything I did because I constantly engaged her as I prepared my supplies. Before she knew it started, it was over, and I had the blood sample I needed. She looked up with a beaming smile, and exclaimed that it didn’t even hurt this time. I smiled and Anna was rewarded with a princess sticker and sucker. This was simply the beginning of meaningful care relationship that lasted the next six months. Despite the anguish of seeing a young child battling cancer, Anna inspired me toward a life of service in healthcare. I have always valued service work and have endeavored to make an impact. Thus, I spent my summers with children, teaching them baseball, and in return, they taught me patience. In high school I also volunteered at a local hospital greeting and escorting patients. This developed my ability to communicate with people of all ages and backgrounds. Now as a working professional I can give back by working with children serving as their mentor, role model, academic coach, and friend. As a Medical Laboratory Scientist (MLS) through hard work, decisive decision making, and expletory customer service skills I earned my promotion to a Technical Specialist role after being employed for eight months at Mayo Clinic. I daily diagnose and troubleshoot instrumentation, provide leadership and direction for staff, and serve as a resource for healthcare providers regarding the complex testing we perform. I lead by example and excel at the challenge of working with analytical instrumentation and feel these skills in troubleshooting and diagnosing problems with instruments will transition into accurate and decisive decision making. While shadowing an acute inpatient psychiatric PA, I observed a provider and patient interaction that was collaborative, open, and patient centered. The patient was experiencing acute anxiety related to the transition from the hospital to secondary housing. The PA had a calming effect on the patient and reassured the transition would go flawless. He reminded the patient that they had continued support during this time. This interaction was extremely collaborative, grounded, and generally different than many I observed and experienced with physicians which are often less collaborative and open. The interaction was inspirational, further solidifying my interest in the PA profession. As a PA, I will continue to demonstrate professionalism, competency, and develop care relationships built on trust, compassion, and empathy. The capacity to communicate and connect with people will be the foundation to developing meaningful relationships that bring quality care to the patient, and I will gain a career full of meaning, direction, and satisfaction.
  7. The ability of healthcare providers to connect and effectively interact with people is becoming a lost art, and as a front line laboratory professional I was introduced to the triumphs, challenges, and heartache that come with a healthcare career. However, as a result, I was able to develop the ability to relate to, communicate with, and set people at ease while I performed an often stressful procedure. These interactions and relationships are what drew me to the Physician Assistant (PA) profession. In spite of the almost universal loathe of needle carting lab personal, my job as a phlebotomist led me to meet and develop a meaningful relationship with Anna. She was a seven year old girl who was diagnosed with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. She had large stunning eyes that did not tell the tale of disease, pain, or suffering but instead innocence and hope. She was the child of a single mother, and they were “regulars” on my Saturday morning phlebotomy schedule. Through professionalism, talent to connect with a seven year old girl, and competency at the task I was performing, a relationship of trust was instantly created. The professionalism, set Anna’s mother at ease, and it was often evident that this diagnosis took its toll on her just as much as her daughter. Anna thought I was silly, and failed to notice anything I did because I constantly engaged her as I prepared my supplies. Before she knew it even began, it was over and I had the sample I needed. This was the simple beginning of meaningful care relationship that lasted the next six months. Despite the anguish of seeing a young child battling cancer, Anna was an inspiration and directed me toward a life of service in healthcare. I have always valued service work, and have endeavored to make an impact. My summers were spent working with children teaching them baseball, while they taught me patience. In high school I began to volunteer at a local hospital greeting and escorting patients. This developed, at an early age, the ability to communicate with people of all ages and backgrounds. Now as a working professional I have been able to give back by working with kids from a variety of backgrounds, serving as a mentor, role model, academic coach, and friend. My career as a Medical Laboratory Scientist (MLS) has provided a deep love affair for the scientific basis of disease. I distinguished myself from my laboratory colleagues through hard work, decisive decision making, multitasking, and expletory customer service skills. These attributes were factors that earned my promotion into my Technical Specialist role at Mayo Clinic. I daily diagnose and troubleshoot instrumentation, provide leadership and direction for staff, and serve as a resource for providers and nursing regarding the complex testing we perform. I lead by example and excel at the challenge of working with complex instrumentation and feel these skills in troubleshooting and diagnosing problems will equate to accurate and decisive clinical decision making. While shadowing an acute inpatient Psychiatric PA, I gained insight to the varied opportunities that are available for PAs and how vastly different their daily routine was from an Emergency Department PA. The interactions I observed were extremely collaborative, grounded, and generally different then many I have seen and experienced with Physicians. The interaction was inspiring, and solidified my interest in PA profession. As a PA, I am going to have to demonstrate professionalism, competency, and large knowledgebase all while effectively developing care relationships built on trust, compassion, and empathy. The capacity to communicate and connect with people will be the foundation to developing meaning relationships that bring quality care to the patient, and a career full of meaning, direction, satisfaction to my life.
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