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Maynard

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Maynard last won the day on November 2 2017

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About Maynard

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    Physician Assistant

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  1. If you want hours AND employment then look closely at the "wanted" ads in your area before you make a decision.
  2. Gender discrimination is still illegal in most circumstances, regardless of whether your employment is "at will" or not. Having said that, the law does allow for gender discrimination in some circumstances, and one of them is when the employee is working with people who expose intimate body parts -- a gym can refuse to hire a male as a women's locker room attendant, but not as the front desk receptionist. However, there is a certain burden on the employer to show that this is a patient preference. If the female patients don't mind a male provider then your employer doesn't really have a legal leg to stand on. To justify the different standards they would at least have to show that female patients were making demands for same-gender care in a way that male patients weren't, but even then, if there are enough female patients for you to work with that are willing to be seen by a male, and it's not incredibly difficult for your employer to work around this, they're legally obligated to do so. As far as picking battles goes, you certainly run a risk of offending the wrong people whenever you complain, but you also have a certain amount of power in this situation because the law is (most likely) on your side. If anything, complaining ought to buy you a little added job security, since they'll be worried about a retaliation suit. Just make sure you keep records and put your requests in writing.
  3. Do you all have any thoughts on what the training should look like for a new grad starting in outpatient cardiology? I'm starting my first job as a PA this month and I'll be meeting with the practice manager later to discuss my mentoring program. I purposely took this offer because they want to ease me into the position. The only details I have so far is that they tentatively plan on starting me at four patients a day. I will be their first PA so they're as new to this as I am. I'm not really sure what I should suggest as far as training. Thanks in advance for any help.
  4. Schools prefer CNA over PTA. PTA may be acceptable, but you're better off getting a job where you work with providers rather than physical therapists. Having said that, the work of a PTA might be sufficiently more appealing that you decide it's worth a slight reduction in your competitiveness.
  5. Palming doesn't eliminate the sounds for me. I have had some success with holding the tubing, but I have to hold the tubing a couple inches proximal to the diaphragm (if I hold the tubing where it goes over metal it still transmits). This gives me a very floppy hold on the stethoscope and, like resting the stethoscope on the patient without hands, it's not always feasible. I don't think it's my particular stethoscope, given the brand and the fact that multiple attendings and preceptors have borrowed and used it without comment. However, I do think I could solve this problem by switching to another model. Part of my reason for posting this question was I that I was hoping someone else with the same problem had found a brand that eliminates the issue.
  6. I have very noisy, creaky joints in my fingers, and whenever I auscultate patients I find I often hear more of my joints than I do of the heart. To make matters worse, the sounds made by my joints resemble adventitious heart sounds. I’ve read and tried many different ways of dealing with this, but no way of gripping the stethoscope definitively solves it, except to just rest the stethoscope on the patient’s chest without touching it (not always feasible). Practice has made me better at working around it, but I still feel like I need a better way. The one consistent workaround I’ve had is to use the in-house stethoscope, which magically doesn’t pick up finger sounds the way my much-more-expensive Littmann Cardio III does. Granted, it may not pick up heart sounds quite as well, but I still get a much better exam out of it. I’m wondering if there’s another high-end stethoscope that would solve the issue. Has anyone else had this problem? If so, have you found a solution for it? ***(side note: I know from searching forums on this topic that some people will compare my creaky joints to noise from televisions or people talking in the room and say that I can learn to just tune it out with practice. I assure you, it’s not that simple. If you don’t have this problem (most don’t) then you most likely do not have a solution.)
  7. meagan, if you ever get an e-mail from a Nigerian prince, DON'T ANSWER.
  8. My favorite quote is this: Ms. Rought said her “rule of thumb” was that 20 percent of actinic keratoses progress to cancer. While that might once have been the popular understanding, research now suggests otherwise. Dr. Martin A. Weinstock, a professor of dermatology and epidemiology at Brown University, reported in a 2009 study of men with a history of two or more skin cancers that were not melanomas that the risk of an actinic keratosis progressing to skin cancer was about 1 percent after a year, and 4 percent after four years. More than 50 percent of the lesions went away on their own. After all the isolated anecdotes in the article, you'd think when the writers say, "research now suggests otherwise" they might follow with some actual research that suggests otherwise, but none of those numbers contradicts what the PA said. I'm sure this point will be lost on the pseudointellectuals who read the NYT. This is outrage journalism in action, and they do it because it works. It's the media equivalent of trolling. A sober, measured article in the same newspaper would likely have not gotten posted here and we wouldn't be sending the NYT free traffic and comments. By giving it attention we give it life. I'm not really sure there is any response that is better than just ignoring it. I hope that forum members reading this will stop supporting outrage outlets like Fox and Breitbart on the right or MSNBC and NYT on the left. It's all fun and outrage until you're the one being trolled. Start supporting outlets like PBS or NPR that at least try to be fair.
  9. I'm just curious. I know multiple people with highly variable knowledge bases who all average in the 69-71% range while taking Rosh Review.
  10. How common is it for a medical group to give bonuses to a PA every time he/she orders certain procedures or imaging that the medical group can do in-house? Are there any pitfalls to joining such a practice?
  11. Get the books. I recommend both PPP and the Babcock-O'Connell book, but if you're gonna get one then get Babcock-O'Connell. If you really want to be economical, be frugal with your big expenses (education, car, apartment) and your habitual/daily expenses (e.g. food and drink). I know so many PA students who blow hundreds of dollars on beverages alone and then get stingy about thirty dollar books.
  12. Where are you getting your information? School rankings have nothing to do with their ability to prepare you for the PANCE. If they did they might actually mean something.
  13. No need to feel stupid, but as a future provider do get into the habit of critically analyzing data like this. Look into how they come up with those rankings and you'll see why everyone who knows anything regards them as nothing.
  14. What "rank" are you talking about? Are you referring to US News and World Reports rankings? Outside the PA world nobody knows about those rankings. Inside the PA world everybody but pre-PAs has complete contempt for them. We seriously need to put a sticky in the pre-PA forum about why those rankings are a joke that should be ignored.
  15. It's like with driving. To legally drive you have to have a state-issued driver's license, but it doesn't have to be from the same state you're driving in. UNE is accredited by the same regional body that accredits Harvard and Yale. Those credits are good anywhere in the U.S.
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