pacificcoast7

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About pacificcoast7

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  1. If the job was in southern California, it wouldn't exist. lol. The city I live in is a small northern Midwest town of about 1300 that's an hour away from the nearest Walmart or stoplight. The job is great because the location is not.
  2. Its best to negotiate with other offers in hand. Negotiating otherwise is tough as you don't have a strong position. I'd say for a rural area, the pay is very low considering the patient loads are quite typical. I would keep looking but use what they offer you as a negotiating tool for future jobs. Apply to lots of places, you can never have to many choices and decide whats most important to you in terms of work-life balance/location/pay. Also check out critical access hospitals for jobs. Due to special favorable treatment that they receive from the federal government, they are able to pay much higher salaries on a per-patient basis then other employers.
  3. If still looking, try some small towns. Also the market in Michigan is way better then Ohio due to state practice laws for PAs.
  4. Update: I did not take the above job due to the autonomy issue. I ended up finding another similar critical access hospital in a slightly less remote community where we are expected to see 30-40 patients a week. 100% outpatient job. The pay was only $95K but I work with my supervising doc 2 days a week and 2 days a week with another mid-level. The hospital also gives us 7 weeks PTO which makes up for the lower salary. We can moonlight in the ED for extra pay where the average volume is 25pts a day and double coverage of mid-level and ED doc. I'd love to have a little higher pay and somewhat warmer weather community but finding a job with my patient volumes elsewhere in primary care is not easy.
  5. I'd say the key to finding a job in primary care is go for the critical access hospitals. The schedules are great and generally benefits and pay above average. I work 4x 10 days with 2hr admin a day. I see typically 7-10 patients per day though I have seen as little as 2 and as much as 15. I have no idea how someone manages to see 20+ patients in a day. About 50% of my visits are simple acute care visits which helps me stay on schedule. I love the job and the time we get with patients. The location is rather cold and remote but I see it as the cost of not being overworked and underappreciated.
  6. Recently I have been offered a rural family medicine position at a small critical access hospital working in their primary care clinic. I would start at $110K a year with 4 weeks vacation and a $3000 CME allowance. No extra time off for CME. Their is little to no training at the site and while the clinic has other providers, my supervising physician will only be on site a couple days a month. The position is 4.5 days of clinic and 0.5 administrative. I would be expected to see between 10-15 pt a day in clinic after a couple months. The work load seems not that high and pay is good, but not sure about the autonomy part.