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Lyndhurst

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About Lyndhurst

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    Physician Assistant

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  1. I just graduated this past summer and from my class the average graduation to work time was around 8-10 weeks. The shortest I heard was about 4 weeks but that was one person and there first few weeks were shadowing/orientation on a reduced salary. Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G920A using Tapatalk
  2. I have various resources I used extensively throughout school for sale. I'll indicate where I found them useful with D,C or P Essential Clinical Anatomy 4th ed, Moore et al = D Pance Prep Pearls 1st ed, Williams = D,C & P ! PANCE PANRE Question book 1st edition, Williams = P useful for prep review PA Exam for Dummies, Snyder = D, P PA Board Review 3rd ed, Van Rhee = D, P Current Diagnosis & Treatment Surgery = D, C ADC opthalmoscope and otoscope, travel set, AA batteries = D Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G920A using Tapatalk
  3. congratulations on your acceptance! My program supplied us with laptops when we started. In regards to applications the only special app was examsoft which locks your computer while taking exams so you cannot access any other files or apps. see if your program uses anything similar and if there are any requirements to use it (basically is it mac/Windows compatible). otjer than that a web browser and your preferred office suite us all you need so don't spend a fortune on a high end machine. good luck Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G920A using Tapatalk
  4. Not sure how helpful they will be in getting a job. Our clinical faculty tell us they might be, but I have yet to have that confirmed by any preceptors. My gut says it is more for the programs benefit than ours. As the year has gone on I have logged less and less. I make sure to log enough patients and procedures but that's it. We are required to log an ICD for each patient so that is what I do. Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G920A using Tapatalk
  5. For most classes my least useful study tools were my lecture notes. I found good review books (pearls and van rhee were my most used) along with some good text books (CMDT, step up to medicine and lippincott pharmacology review) helpful. For videos Khan academy is good but doesn't cover all the topics, cme4life has some helpful mnemonics. pa exam review is one good podcast lots of others. Im partial to the AFP and EM boot camp ones but they are not always exactly relevant to didactic and might be more suited to clinicals. Finally use quizlet, search for sets based on your class and you will find lots. I found reviewing questions the best way to learn. Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G920A using Tapatalk
  6. And too many new grass nps..I assume there is a preference for like to hire like...How many nursing administrators with recruiting authority are there compared to PAs in the same position? Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G920A using Tapatalk
  7. As a current student I can echo the authoritarian do as we say nature of my program. They are not very interested in dialogue. Also I am surprised at how many of the practising PAs I meet on rotation are aware of the NCCPAs recent actions. Most admit to not paying attention too much but are surprised when I tell them about the WVa actions. Is there a way to spread that story amongst PAs? How I don't know maybe advertisement in journals. Perhaps PAFT could take action on this at the conference. Increasing awareness amongst practising PAs could only help Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G920A using Tapatalk
  8. I would just ask them out right why they have a declining pass rate. Cost is by far the biggest factor. Not just tuition but cost of living as well. Every dollar you borrow is paid back plus interest. Rotations are important. How much travel is required or can you stay local. It can be expensive to move frequently during clinical year. Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G920A using Tapatalk
  9. That is great news! Average salaries are a little lower where we are and we are still a few months away from graduation so not many have secured jobs yet. My worry came from casual conversations with classmates about expected salaries. We had a lecture on contracts and negotiations a while ago and it seemed that some in my class were a little surprised to hear $80k should be a minimum not a target. Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G920A using Tapatalk
  10. I think the increasing amount of new graduates both PA and NP probably have some effect on holding down the average salary. In my program the average age was 27 but if you take out the half dozen oldest it would drop that down to 25 or less. They have graduated college, worked for a year or two as CNA, EMT or MA and so any salary over $60K is a lot of money. Couple that lack of experience with a lack of confidence in their true value and they could easily accept offers that are fairly low. Of course my wiser, older self has accepted an offer for $65K...it is a residency program I just hope it is worth it. Maybe some of the more senior members would be willing to comment on if they have seen 43% salary increase over the last 6 years.
  11. How hungry are you to start PA school? How settled and happy are you with your life in Michigan? I dont think turning down the acceptance is a bad decision. No point starting the stress of PA school in a place you dont want to be at a school you have reservations about. Of course you need to be at peace with the fact you might reapply and not get in. Contact the schools where you are waitlisted and get feedback on what prevented them from offering you an accpetance. Improve your application with more clinical hours, although you have enough for most schools. Finally have a plan B...if you absolutely dont want to do MD/DO (although I would take the next year to really make sure) thne you should consider RN-->NP. The end ppint career wise for PA and NP is pretty much the same. There is more than one way to work in health care as a provider.
  12. QoH I am not a practicing PA in the UK (I'm not even practicing in the USA, still a student) but I do have long term interest in moving to the UK. I have been keeping an eye on how things are developing with PAs over there. I'm not sure how you are connected to the UK so I will assume you have a work visa already figured out. The NHS is by far and away the largest employer in healthcare. There are private hospitals but I'm not sure if they use PAs. The NHS has been utilizing PAs increasingly and the number of PA schools has grown to about half a dozen or so. The UK PA association is part of the Royal College of Physicians, is the Faculty of Physician Associates. There is a bunch of information on their website http://www.fparcp.co.uk/faqs/ The highlights are that 1) American trained PAs can work in the UK. 2) PAs have a more limited scope. They are unable prescribe and cannot order ionizing x-rays or CTs 3) Salaries are much lower, working for the NHS means that salaries are predetermined and arranged in bands and grades. PAs start at Band 7 (~31K GBP) with 5 years of experience you can move up to band 8a which tops out at 48K GBP. Far less than over here with a far higher cost of living....especially in London. Another point to highlight from there webpage is: "Employers are usually looking for physician associates with a number of years of experience. Now that there are UK universities educating physician associates, there will be many home-grown physician associates looking for jobs so it will be necessary to recruit locally" For me it is still a little ways off before I seriously consider moving back. My hope is by then the NHS will be utilizing PAs with an increased scope and corresponding increased salary. We shall see, but if anywhere could use the improvements in efficiency and cost lowering that PAs bring to the table it is the NHS. EDIT: There are actually 24 active programs in the UK with 4 more starting in 2017 and more in development! Looks like PA programs are growing as fast over there as they are over here!
  13. Currently im staying with family while I finish up rotations. My wife is renting a place near her parents. Next year our plan is to continue living there. The house is not in the best shape but it is owned by family friends and the rent is cheap. Also it is across a field from her parents so easy access to baby sitting and family support while I am away. Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G920A using Tapatalk
  14. Just had a very similar conversation with my wife this weekend. PSLF looks tempting but there is just too much risk involved. Politicians could change the rules or a job may not qualify. Ultimately I dont want to feel restricted in my career opportunities because I'm holding out for relief. Also I just dont feel comfortable relying on the largesse of the government. I'd sooner take control and just go all out to try and clear our debt as fast as we can. This means living on the same budget we have been on for the past two years, holding off on replacing our vehicles, plus working as much overtime as I can. The plan is to be completely debt free in four years. At that point well we can start to make real plans on how we want to live , what career opportunities we want to pursue...maybe even replace my car (but probably not, its a Subaru so it is not broken in properly till you get to 500,000 miles!)
  15. Congratulations on your acceptance! If you are absolutely determined to start studying early then I wont try and talk you out of it. rather than suggesting books to read, you could check out some of the tutorial sites. I dont think it really matters what you watch, as at this stage it will be more about getting familiar with the sources and figuring out which ones resonate with you better. Some of my favourites have been Khan Academy Medicine (A good range of topics, some aimed at med students and some at nursing students) CRASH! Medical review (Aimed at med students so it goes into more detail than needed but useful for extra info) CME4Life (all sorts of videos on here from board review packed full of mnemonics, case studies and some are related to life as a PA) Strong Medicine (aimed at med students so some of the information is more detailed than needed but it is good stuff to know) These were the ones I used most often, there were others as I would google for tutorials when I needed some help understanding a topic. Personally I dont think you will get much from doing real studying at this stage, but it cant hurt to get familiar with some of the online sources that are out there.
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