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SeaBird

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About SeaBird

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    Physician Assistant Student

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  1. Hi! I'm a female PA student at an NYC program that will be doing an international rotation from June 1- July 1(ish). Hoping to find someone to occupy my room in our 3 BR apartment in the Upper East Side (currently living with 2 other female roommates who are also in my PA program). Location is awesome - 3 subway stations with 10 min walk, many bus stops, and super easy to commute within Manhattan or Harlem/Bronx/Queens area. Within walking distance to NYP Cornell, Memorial Sloan Kettering, Lenox Hill Hospital, and Hospital for Special Surgery. Apartment specs listed on rotating room - please inquire through there or PM me for more details!
  2. One website that I know of is Rotating Room - I'm currently using it to hopefully find someone to sublet my room for a month when I'm away on an international rotation. I'd take you up on housing but I'm unfortunately in the NYC area!
  3. I can only speak from the experience of my PA program and what I've heard from other friends in different PA schools, but in general my impression is that schools in large cities place more emphasis on at-risk patient populations like LGBTQ/HIV+/etc in their curriculums than those in more suburban/rural areas. You can also get a sense of which PA programs tend to be more involved in social justice by perusing the Student Academy of AAPA page.
  4. I lived alone during didactic year and absolutely believe it was the best option for me based on what I need for the ideal study/living environment. Most people in my class lived with roommates in our class our outsiders, and in general experiences seemed to range from perfectly fine to stressful (but thankfully nothing catastrophic from what I heard). I'm a fairly social person, but I never felt isolated since I could always invite people from class over at my convenience. For clinical year I am living with two of my friends from my program, and now I definitely prefer it over living alone for the camaraderie and shared expenses. Also I agree with the above poster on checking in about AirBnB policies with your lease, FYI. This would absolutely not fly in my building
  5. Congrats on the acceptance! I can provide insight on living close to school. My program is in a big city, and my didactic year apartment was super expensive, but only a 7 min walk from our class building and 7+ different subway lines/bus stops within walking distance. In addition to literally no commute, other benefits of living near school were the increased study space options, and being able to quickly go back/forth from school to my apartment within the day to get things I forgot, drop off things, etc. I also do not study well with my family around, and would absolutely not want to risk compromising studying at this point in my career, so these factors would have absolutely outweighed living at home if I had that option. After my lease ended, I moved to a different apartment with friends from my class to a different neighborhood that's cheaper and closer to our rotations. Living in a less intense study space has been fine for clinical year, so you can certainly move back home after a 1-year lease for didactic. I personally think your commute to school is quite significant, so you'll need to carefully consider if your ability to study at home justifies the commute and money saved. Good luck!
  6. Pace University (NYC campus, presumably the Pleasantville campus also) has provided the opportunity for PA students to do a rotation through Child Family Health International for many years now. This organization is pretty well-established and appears to be open for PA and medical student rotations, so even if your future PA/med school is not directly associated with this group, potentially there are some out there that would allow this option as an elective.
  7. I have found Google Docs to be perfect for my style of note taking. Most programs (including mine) present lectures in powerpoint form, and a good approach I found is to copy/paste the entire powerpoint content into Google Docs and outline the lecture while it's happening. Doing this is Google Docs is extremely helpful to keep everything organized, and I can search for terms within specific lectures if needed. Whatever your approach, keeping study materials succinct and organized is key!
  8. If you're more of an audio/visual learner, I would consider looking at the various Health and Medicine videos on Khan Academy. Very easy to do in your free time, and many of the videos were helpful for our Physiology course in PA school.
  9. I think the utility of outside resources for didactic studying is very program dependent, but for me so far, RR has been extremely helpful specifically for our Clinical Medicine course. Same goes for Pance Prep Pearls - often I used my didactic notes as a supplement for these resources rather than the reverse, and I have been doing well. Our class was able to get a 2-week free trial and a $50 group discount rate, and I would definitely recommend looking into those options if possible.
  10. Major: Neuroscience Minors: Spanish, Humanities
  11. I have a few different study methods for during and after class that vary slightly depending on the lecturer and the quality of their presentations. I heavily utilize Google documents and Pance Prep Pearls for note taking in class, quizlet and Rosh Review for memorizing, and various video resources to review and reinforce concepts that were confusing/not explained well. I think an iPad would be great for bringing all of my study material with me on-the-go, but my Macbook Pro has fit my studying needs. I only ever use a paper notebook for anatomy lab!
  12. If your school does not offer Pharm or Patho, other undergrad courses I took that I have found very helpful for PA school include Endocrinology, Immunology, and various Neurobiology/Biopsychology classes I had for my major.
  13. @sotaskimmer and anyone else, how much time between graduating and starting a residency is too much? One month, three months, etc. Thanks!
  14. I second /u/iovelost's comment. Clinical research, even if you do "interact" with patients, is still an iffy source of HCE for many programs since you are not directly involved with their actual care. You do have a substantial body of hours, so I would go ahead and apply, but I would endorse applying to as many programs as financially possible to help compensate for the HCE question. Good luck!
  15. University of New England also offers a 3 credit medical terminology course. It might not be one of the cheapest options, but it is an accredited university and also has its own PA program, so the class would certainly count for any prereq needs. Another benefit I found was that there are multiple dates you can start the class, and you can finish the course earlier than the allotted completion date.
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