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zoopeda

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zoopeda last won the day on April 6 2015

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  1. In my experience, every program is different and prioritizes different attributes. If I were you, I would call each program from which you got rejected and explain how you're still motivated but ask for advice on how each program thinks you ought to improve. You are planning a medical mission. Does your dream school value that? You are proud of your post-bac sGPA. Is that adequate for the school you want to attend? I think your plan above looks very strong. I also think schools take a second look at applicants who hang in there for a second cycle, admiring the dedication. And, finally,
  2. Your age is not an issue. I turned 36 today and am in my 2nd year of PA school. Getting your GPA up from a 2.7, on the other hand, is going to take significant time and effort. Don't be discouraged. I had an initial undergrad GPA of 3.0 and got accepted to 3 PA programs first time applying. That said, I got a Masters degree in between and scored near 4.0 on YEARS worth of science pre-reqs in between undergrad and PA application in order to have a solid recent GPA and much improved overall. There's always someone in most programs who gets in with a 3.0. Usually those candidates have trem
  3. Really? Our financial aid person told us otherwise. That would be a big deal...
  4. Agreed. It's the person who lives near poverty to work for a non-profit for 10 years who really gets screwed over in taxes come forgiveness time.
  5. Big thumbs up. Couldn't agree more. It's true. Relations between PCPs and CAM providers is very sour--on both sides. It's sad to see an ND slander a PCP, but the fact is, we make blunders in allopathic medicine every day. We can only work to better our own practices to better serve the patients that come to us. There's a reason some patients are fleeing to alternative medicine, and that's not how it should be. On the other hand, I do think the more we embrace the strengths of legitimate (i.e., licensed) NDs and other providers (DCs, LAcs, etc), the more we ultimately serve our
  6. Dudes, what's with the smears? According to his acupuncturist and a full investigation by the CA board of med, the acupuncturist tried to convince him to seek conventional care until she was blue in the face. You can lead a horse to water... This is another very distracting post. You can't blame an LAc for Steve Jobs' death simply because he chose to visit an acupuncturist. He chose not to seek conventional care. There was no malpractice involved. Period. Not to mention, yet again, this example doesn't even pertain to naturopaths.
  7. To be clear, this person is not (and never was) a Naturopathic Doctor (N.D.). Not sure the point of this post, but I just wanted to clarify that, according to the article, he never graduated from an accredited ND school, never passed his national boards, never received a license from the state (since FL does not even license NDs), and apparently called himself "Dr" based on his PhD. Obviously, this guy's a fraud. This article has nothing to do with the above conversation.
  8. If they are currently wrapping up interviews, that means they kept you under consideration for the last several months. Some people get rejected more quickly. Unless somehow you've been forgotten, I'd say it's a good sign that you didn't get a rejection letter. Now that interviews are winding down, I imagine letters will soon go out to the remaining applicants. It's a tough process--almost as tough as being in PA school! But that you were carefully considered means your application must have some strength. Keep your chin up, and prepare to apply again. Caryn and Chris are wonderful and
  9. The undergrad GPA includes grades from any coursework taken as an undergrad--either before or after graduation (i.e. pre-reqs you might take years after graduation are still considered as a part of your undergrad GPA.) PSU definitely looks at cumulative & science GPAs as well as grade trends. Of all the schools I applied to, they seemed to spend the most time analyzing my entire application and getting to know me as an individual. But as far as stats go, check out the webpage. Minimums, averages, and ranges (all on the chart on this page) are all you need to compare with your profile.
  10. In other words, if you are admitted to a provisionally accredited graduate PA program, your class is guaranteed a chance to finish coursework/graduate and sit for the PANCE -- even if accreditation is revoked after matriculation. i.e., If ARC-PA were to revoke accreditation tomorrow, we first years would all still graduate, sit for the PANCE, and become PAs. That said, Penn State is already accredited with a medical school, which helps immensely. There are a million reasons why we won't be denied full accreditation next year (which Chris or Caryn could elaborate on). Bottom line, choose th
  11. These are really good points. Anatomy from a PhD and anatomy from a clinician (PA or MD) will be two different experiences. One will be academically focused, and the other with a clinical focus (with overlap, of course). I actually primarily take anatomy with a PA teacher who is amazing. (And we have certain modules with a PhD anatomist who is very much into lecturing at length on the anatomical minutia.) A big part of our primary clinical anatomy class includes imaging and clinical cases in addition to the cadaver dissection. It's really helpful if you know how you learn and know which
  12. It's true that Chris took her admissions director and most senior faculty (i.e. nine credits of Clinical Medicine and 2 credits of anatomy every semester) with her to Penn State when she left DeSales. I would imagine being told your program was going to at least double in 2 years could have an impact on the way you run your program. Seems reasonable to think that could affect the decision to leave. Perhaps a question to ask her directly, if it comes to it.
  13. There's a whole thread on "Where did Chris go?" in the DeSales forum. Long story short, she left to start the Penn State program. I'm in my first year at Penn State and will be part of her second class to graduate. Chris is a FORCE anywhere she goes, and any program suffers to lose her and is psyched to have her. I'm not sure enough time has passed to see the long-term effect on the DeSales PANCE score, but I do know that DeSales also used to win the challenge bowl (basically medical trivia competition) every year--something they are no longer known for. I also know that Chris' real claim
  14. Oh man, posted that over a year ago before I matched a school. How time flies. I've since taken a seat at Chris' new Penn State program; started in May. Happy to report we just won the state challenge bowl in Erie, PA. Final round score 100 to 20! Not to rub it in, but super exciting!!!
  15. Did these "naturopaths" graduate from an accredited ND program and go on to pass boards and attain licensure in the state in which they're practicing? If not, you might as well delete your comment. If so, two things are possible: 1) There's more to the story than what was presented here, or 2) One or both of these people are committing malpractice and will end up in court and/or losing a license should these diseases run the course you're implying they will (and, God-willing, no one will suffer or die as a result). An interesting coupe of anecdotes, for sure. Let us know how the
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