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J.lsn

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About J.lsn

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  1. Anyone out there who's no trying to get $90+ dollars for their copy?
  2. They're expensive because the book is out of print now. Yes it is! Don't suppose you would want to part with your copy?
  3. No it's not worth hundreds of dollars. That's why I'm trying to find it somewhere other than amazon.
  4. Anyone out there with a copy they are willing to part with? Just flipped through my preceptors copy. Seems like a great resource for those of us who are still green. Hoping someone who's been practicing long enough for it to collect some dust would be willing to help out an up-and-comer! I have $$ and a pay-pal account, but can't afford the $100+ price on amazon. Clinical Survival Guide for PA Students http://www.amazon.com/dp/0974179507 Please PM me if you can part with it, thanks.
  5. Sorry for the bump but anyone out there with a copy they are willing to part with? Just flipped through my preceptors copy. Seems like a great resource for those of us who are still green. Hoping someone who's been practicing long enough for it to collect some dust would be willing to help out an up-and-comer! I have $$ and a pay-pal account, but can't afford the $100+ price on amazon.
  6. True, a more honest way to reach the same result. And as far as effort and attitude towards the specific rotation, mine hasn't changed. I'm not just trying to "fill the basic requirements." I do show up well before my preceptors each day and stay late as well. I feel it's my preceptors perceptions of me that may be altered knowing I'm not interested in surgery. Most of my shadowing before school happened to be with a surgical PA so I had an idea ahead of time prior to this rotation that it wasn't my cup of tea. But I know that regardless of the rotation or person I have endless le
  7. I hope my thread title gets attention but it's not what it looks like... I am a second year student aiming at primary care as a career and currently in my first rotation which is surgery. I told my preceptor when I arrived that I am planning on primary care and may be regretting the decision to do so. I feel like my experience has been altered since my surgery PA preceptor now knows I don't want to work in a similar field. I feel like if he/she thought I wanted to be in their shoes they would teach more of the intricacies of the position and allow more hands on/ in depth training. Wou
  8. Personally I've never found much continuity judging courses based on CC vs 4y or in the level 100-200-300-400. I took many of my prereqs at a CC and some of the 200 level classes were much harder than many of my 400 series classes at my 4y. But like others have said, cheaper+smaller class size helps.
  9. Personally I've never found much continuity judging courses based on CC vs 4y or in the level 100-200-300-400. I took many of my prereqs at a CC and some of the 200 level classes were much harder than many of my 400 series classes at my 4y. But like others have said, cheaper+smaller class size helps.
  10. Personally I've never found much continuity judging courses based on CC vs 4y or in the level 100-200-300-400. I took many of my prereqs at a CC and some of the 200 level classes were much harder than many of my 400 series classes at my 4y. But like others have said, cheaper+smaller class size helps.
  11. PA school is very hard to get into, with smaller class sizes. Each school I applied to has been setting new applicant records every year. Considering all the applicants to my program only the top 3% were accepted, and each year that number gets smaller. PA school is MUCH faster pace than med school. Every med student I've spoken with who knows what we go through fully agrees. Not to say anything about your didactic ability, but don't think they are the same. MD's are the marathon runners, PA's are the sprinters. Don't bank on being able to rotate anywhere you want (like your hometown
  12. PA school is very hard to get into, with smaller class sizes. Each school I applied to has been setting new applicant records every year. Considering all the applicants to my program only the top 3% were accepted, and each year that number gets smaller. PA school is MUCH faster pace than med school. Every med student I've spoken with who knows what we go through fully agrees. Not to say anything about your didactic ability, but don't think they are the same. MD's are the marathon runners, PA's are the sprinters. Don't bank on being able to rotate anywhere you want (like your hometown
  13. PA school is very hard to get into, with smaller class sizes. Each school I applied to has been setting new applicant records every year. Considering all the applicants to my program only the top 3% were accepted, and each year that number gets smaller. PA school is MUCH faster pace than med school. Every med student I've spoken with who knows what we go through fully agrees. Not to say anything about your didactic ability, but don't think they are the same. MD's are the marathon runners, PA's are the sprinters. Don't bank on being able to rotate anywhere you want (like your hometown
  14. PA school is very hard to get into, with smaller class sizes. Each school I applied to has been setting new applicant records every year. Considering all the applicants to my program only the top 3% were accepted, and each year that number gets smaller. PA school is MUCH faster pace than med school. Every med student I've spoken with who knows what we go through fully agrees. Not to say anything about your didactic ability, but don't think they are the same. MD's are the marathon runners, PA's are the sprinters. Don't bank on being able to rotate anywhere you want (like your hometown
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