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  1. Hey everyone, I created this list of schools for those of us who did poorly in college when we were kids and have desires to be PA's. The list consists of the following: School name, CGPA, SGPA, PrereqGPA, and HCE hours. I don't know if this is ALL of the schools, but it was all of the ones I could find and I looked at pretty much every PA program. I hope this helps some of you out in your application process. If any one knows of other schools you can comment below and I will add them. Best of luck to all. https://docs.google.com/document/d/10DB5YytgTE6oOarGVgJQ_1Mm8Jj6g5J8eS1-yRj1CA8/edit?usp=sharing
    63 points
  2. yup, I have a lot of free time on my hands working solo night shifts.... anyway, some of these things have been listed here over the years, but thought I would put them all in one place 1. your first job is about leaning your trade, not about money 2. if you can afford to do a residency in your field of choice, do it! see #1 above 3. as a new grad you can have 2 of the following 3 if you are lucky; location, specialty, salary. choose wisely. 4. don't buy a $50,000 car right out of school. a good rule of thumb is take your yearly salary and divide it by 3. at most you should spend 30k on a car if you make 90k/yr assuming no alternative source of income and no other major debt. I have too many friends who have to work extra to make their $700/mo BMW payment. drive a safe and efficient car until you can afford your dream car. 5. don't buy a $500,000 house right out of school if you are single. take your yearly income and multiply by 3. this is a good price for a first house. 90k salary? 270k house. spouse/partner also makes 90k? you can double that. 6. living within your means(see #4 and 5 above) means you can work less, travel more, and take time to enjoy life. I spent too much of my 20s, 30s, and most of my 40s working 180-220 hrs/month. don't do that. now I work 168 hrs/month and have never been happier. I used to never have time to go out with friends. now I go out at least once/week, go to jazz clubs, etc. in 2017 I already have tix for sting, red hot chili peppers, U2, and foreigner concerts. I also now have time to do 2-3 international medical missions/year and taake time out with the family for spring break, cme conferences, etc 7. don't take the first job you are offered unless it's perfect. don't settle for mediocrity. 8. don't work in a field you detest just because it is a job. moving is better. you will be miserable doing surgery, urology, pain clinic, etc if you hate it 9. don't accept a "training salary" unless in a formal residency program. A formal residency program has off-service rotations and dedicated learning time. don't be fooled by training fellowships that are just low paid jobs in one dept in disguise. 10. don't accept a position that does not offer cme, retirement, malpractice, vacation, etc. you have earned a benefits package 11. don't work in a very narrow field right out of school unless it is your dream job and you never intend to leave the specialty. I know lots of folks stuck in jobs they hate who can't leave them. 12. if you are getting burned out consider the following: work fewer hrs/mo, see fewer pts/shift, switch specialty, switch location, find somewhere you are appreciated. I can't tell you how much better my mood is after transitioning from a high volume/low acuity facility(30 pts/12 hrs) where I was treated like an interchangeable worker bee to a low volume/high acuity(10 sick pts/24 hrs) facility where I am valued as an individual for my skill set and experience. 13. don't sign a lengthy contract or a non-compete clause. these are tools to keep clinicians in crappy jobs. If it's a good job, you will want to stay anyway. 14. don't take a job where your clinical supervisor is an RN or office manager. we are not medical assistants 15. don't refer to yourself as Dr Smith's PA. they don't own you. Say instead " I'm John Doe, one of the PAs here" or "I'm John Doe, I work with Dr Smith on the surgical service". language matters. don't let yourself be treated like an assistant. don't regularly take out trash, take your own vitals, room patients, etc unless the docs in the group do too. I can see this in a small office, but there is no excuse for it elsewhere. 16. don't work for free. if you are charting at home, make sure that you get paid for it. may add more later, but that's what I've got for now after a 24 hr shift. 17. don't take a job at far below market value just to be in a particular location. lots of new grads are taking jobs in NYC for example at 55-60k. As a young new grad this may seem like a lot of money if you have never had a real job before. it isn't when the national average is around 90k. know what you are worth. don't accept less. if enough of us do that the crappy job offers will go away. 18. I am not a fan of RVU bonuses. I think they encourage sloppy work and poor charting, because they incentivize you to see more pts/hr and do more procedures(at the expense of good/appropriate workups and good charting) . Go for the raise. You should get paid whether you see 5/hr or 1/hr. Both will happen. Do good work for a good wage
    60 points
  3. ...No one knows. You're receiving moderately-educated guesses at best, and wild shots in the dark from internet strangers at worst. Even an adcom member can't give you a 100% reliable "chance" because each school is different. Your experiences, personal statement, school list, timing, and "fit" all play a role. Even then, adcoms make surprising decisions. It's not uncommon to be accepted to reach programs and rejected from "safety" schools. Instead of risking false confidence or misplaced defeat, ask yourself these questions instead: Are my GPAs, both science and cumulative, competitive compared to this school's accepted student profile? If not, is the reason compellingly discussed in my personal statement? Does my transcript show that I have grasped the fundamental knowledge to succeed with intense, graduate-level medical science coursework? If there are weak areas of knowledge on my transcript, have I put in the work to turn those weaknesses into strengths? Do I meet all the prerequisite requirements for each school on my list? If I have a questionable course, have I asked for clarification from the schools that require it? Is my PCE (hours and type) competitive compared to this school's accepted student profiles? If my GPAs are below the accepted average, does my PCE surpass the average? If my PCE is below the accepted average, does my GPA surpass it? Have I spent time making sure my experience descriptions are comprehensive and accurately convey what I've learned? Have I scored at least 300 on the GRE (if I'm choosing to take it)? Do my other activities show deeper layers of my personality and interests? Have I taken on increasing responsibility as I've grown? If I've stated an interest in a specific area (for example, underserved or rural care), do my experiences show my passion for that area is genuine? Have at least three people agreed to write me an excellent letter? Do my references meet each school's requirements? Does my personal narrative have an introduction that grabs the reader's interest? Do I "show" the qualities that will make me an outstanding PA, instead of just listing them? Do I show understanding of a PA's role? Does the conclusion convince the reader I'm ready for PA school? Have others read and enjoyed my narrative? Is it grammatically flawless? Do I have an overarching passion or theme that ties my application together? Are my future goals guided by my experiences? Am I a good "fit" at each school on my list? If an interviewer asks me why I applied to each school, what will I say? Do I have a game plan for applying? Have I set myself up for success by planning to apply early? Have I thought beyond the finish line of getting a seat to the logistics, pressures, and potential loneliness of devoting the next 2-3 years to school? Am I in a financial position to fund CASPA costs, interview expenses, seat deposits, and relocation expenses? Am I in a financial position to afford PA school? How is my credit score? Do I have significant undergrad loans, car payments, mortgage payments, or other financial constraints? Does my family truly understand the time investment of PA school? Will my partner move with me if I relocate, or will we have a long-distance relationship? Are we both on the same page about these plans? Can I confidently say I'm ready, not just for PA school, but for life as a PA? Gratuitous link to my blog: https://emttopac.wordpress.com
    40 points
  4. Hey everyone, I'm a fourth year medical student- if there are any of you that ever spend time on Student Doctor Network might know me as Mad Jack. I am a respiratory therapist as well, though no longer by trade, but I keep my license active as a matter of pride. But here's something I've noticed over the years. I was guilty of it as well, when I was "just" a respiratory therapist, and even now, when I'll occasionally mutter that I'm "just" a medical student. You aren't "just" PAs. You're damn good clinicians that many hospitals and practices couldn't function without. You've got strong clinical skills and acumen that allow you to do many of the same things physicians do, and often just as well or better. Yeah, you aren't the physician, but you're also not "just" a PA, you're a physician assistant, a title you worked hard to earn and work harder still to practice. So next time you find yourself about to say it, maybe hold back and say something else. I know it's easy, and fast, and gets across what you like to say. I did it all the time as a respiratory therapist- "oh, I'm just the RT..." And now it's frequently, "oh, I'm just the medical student..." But I feel like it feeds into a subconscious narrative that you're something lesser, either to you or those around you. Every clinician should be proud of what they do, physician assistants as much as any. We all make this health care thing work (when it does, at least) and we all have a part to play. This post was kind of prompted due to my accidentally offending a PA. She said, "I'm just a PA," to the radiologist when asking him to verify what she'd read. He and I were both like, "you're not just a PA." Her read was right, and I was like, "you're not just a PA, you know what you're doing." Which I think she took to mean other PAs don't, but she does. But that's not what I meant at all- "you're not just a PA, you're a skilled clinician that knows what you are doing- you are a physician assistant, and a good one at that" would have been the more wordy but accurate thing to say. Yeah, she isn't a radiologist, but maybe she could've said, "I just wanted an expert read on this" and brought him up rather than shooting herself down, I don't know. With other providers it isn't a big deal, but with patients, I feel like saying "my initial impression is X, and we should have a final read from radiology soon" rather than "I'm just the PA, and I think X, but let's see what the radiologist says" comes across better. Anyway, that's it from me. Keep being awesome you guys.
    33 points
  5. For anyone who closely follows this and/or other threads comparing yourself to others and getting panicked when you don't get that phone call on the day/hour you were expecting: I get it. It's extremely hard to get a type A applicant to desensitize to the idea of having to trust the process and be willing to give up a locus of control; however, whenever you do learn to do so, you'll enjoy the process and appreciate your fellow applicants and their own victories much, much more. Do not panic, do not wish failure upon your peers, and do not despair or give up until you've gotten that final rejection -- even then, don't give up... PA programs love an applicant with some grit and a positive attitude. I am not writing this because an act of providence has occurred and I am reeling from the high that is an acceptance to PA School -- on the contrary, I received a rejection and a waitlist today (no acceptances thus far, in fact) -- I just want everyone to know that they aren't alone in this process, what they are feeling is natural, and that it's all gonna work out in due time.
    32 points
  6. I just want to encourage those of you who have a low GPA and want to become a PA. Here’s a little bit about me. I applied twice to PA school. The first time I applied, I applied to 12 schools and didn’t get an interview invite from any of them. My cGPA during the first cycle was around d 2.88 and my sGPA was around a 3.2. I had rough start to my college career. My GRE scores were horrible- less than 140 on both the quantitative and qualitative. After my rejection, I retook the GRE. I ended up getting 151 on the qualitative, 147 on the quantitative, and 3.0 writing. I retook two of my prerequisite classes, both of which I had C’s in. The grades I got in those classes was an A, and one B. I Also took another biology class just to add a little more to my GPA. Even with my improvements, I still didn’t fully believe that I could compete with the stellar applicants on this forum. I guess one of things that I had going for me as it concerned my GPA is that there was an upward trend. Over the last 100 or so credit hours, I went hard. I averaged somewhere around a 3.5 cGPA—this included the later semesters of my undergrad work as well as my post-bacc—but still my cGPA remained at below 3.0 As many of you know, low GPA’s aren’t appealing to schools. Many of you are wondering what can you do to stand out amongst the crowd of those with damn near 4.0 GPA’s. Here’s my advice, go to the open houses!!!!! Almost every school that I’ve applied to has an open house meeting. Here, you’ll have the opportunity to meet with the admission faculty. By attending, you become more than just an applicant, you become an actual person. When you go, make sure you dress and act as though you were on an actual interview. You are being watched the entire time by both the faculty and students. Make sure you speak well and look good. Buy a new suit…but not a black one. Black is a common color that people wear to the open houses and interview. Remember, your goal is to stand out, so details are important. This advice my friends is what I believe contributed to my admission into PA school. Of course, my hard work over my last 100 credit hours played a major part too. So I guess my point in all this is to push as hard as you can to help resolve the mistakes that you may have made in your earlier college days and go for the gold!! My last bit of advice is to not allow yourselves to be filled with doubt. I was disheartened to read some of the replies to the posts on this fourm where PA applicants asked if they had a chance of getting accepted to PA school with stats that were similar to mine. Some people were advised by members of this fourm that they had no chance, and I couldn't disagree more. This opportunity is yours for the taking. Don't accept someone on a blog site telling you that you don't have what it takes. Blessinga to you all.
    28 points
  7. Normally I don’t respond to these type of forum posts because it usually does no good. But since you used my name (Jim Van Rhee) in the post I feel obligated. So, a few points: 1. Diversity- so for you, diversity is based on the school photos. Did you recognize the LGBTQ students in the photos? Did you recognize the military veterans in the photos? Did you recognize the students from rural underserved communities in the photo? There is more to diversity than any photo can show. 2. Money and Tuition- yes, the Yale tuition is $105,812. So, and I quote “ALMOST 30% higher tuition than every school!!!” To be 30% higher than every school that means all other school tuitions are around $74,069. So, I looked at a few other programs. A program in California tuition is $174,380. If you say just schools in the Northeast, then a program in Massachusetts I found has a tuition of $109,039 and a program in Connecticut at $102,955. None of these are 30% lower, some are higher. 3. Money again- application fees and I quote again “I really advise Pre PAs to spend their money wisely before applying to a school that’s making well over a quarter million in application fees just so they can tell you no .” Yes, the more people who apply the more admission fees are collected and yes, the more people that apply the more people are denied because we can only take a certain number of students. I think this is the same for every PA program in the country. Using your number of $250,000, you said over but I will use $250,000, with the application fee for the program being $50 that means 5000 applied and submitted a fee to the program. We have not even have half of that number of completed applicants. 4. No respect and faculty and staff a mess- this based on your online interview with us and may be some interactions with the admission team. How dare you. The faculty and I work incredibly hard every day, as do all PA faculty around the country, to make sure students have a great experience. And it starts with admission. We have an admission team that works with students through the admission process, we were doing interviews online before COVID saving students travel money, we revisited the prereqs to remove hurdles to students applying. Once in the program we have created a Well Being program for students to help them with the stress that comes with PA school and life. We have a Career services team to help students with CV writing, interviewing and job placement for after graduation. One last thing- you said last 5 years of school photos. We have only admitted 3 classes. Are you even talking about the right program? You said 1-6 out of 50ish or so, if you mean 50 classes then you really have the wrong program. Everyone is entitled to their opinion, but they are not entitled to present false or misleading information or information without context. If you discover you are wrong I hope you apologize and post it to the forum.
    26 points
  8. This is copied from paadmissions "Ask a PA Admissions Director." I found it hiding in the bowels of that forum (page 81), and I figured placing it here would make it very handy for those perusing personal statements and seeking advice. Posted 20 May 2014 - 02:46 PM Hi guys! I've put together some hints for writing a good personal statement below. These hints were gathered from several medical school websites and from our own experience with our program. Hope this helps! The personal statement is required as a part of any application to PA school. Many applicants make writing a personal statement a daunting task, but it does not have to be. Below are helpful hints and topics to avoid that can help you write a good personal statement. Topic: Why you want to be a PA? Personal Statement Helpful Hints: · Engage the reader and create interest. · Get to the point. There is a character limit for personal statements. One page is usually all it takes to make your point. · Avoid using flowery language and/or big words throughout your statement. · Make sure the statement is structured in a logical order and flows nicely so it is easy to read. · Do not restate your resume. · Incorporate how your healthcare experience and non-healthcare experience (academics, volunteer, and leadership positions) prepared you for PA school. · Be insightful and analytical about your understanding of the role of the PA. Use your clinical experiences to draw this conclusion. · Call out the elephant in the room. If you had a “hiccup” in your academic career, you should BRIEFLY address it (i.e. death in the family, immaturity factor, poor study habits), state what you did to overcome it, and what you have done to sustain an upward trend in your academic performance. · If you have a strong desire to enter a certain field of medicine, explain why. For example, if you want to go into primary care, what have you done to prepare yourself for this field (i.e. clinical experience opportunities, skill sets, are you from a disadvantaged background, etc.), and the challenges PAs face, if any in the particular field. · Have more than one person review your statement. An advisor, career services representative, or a writing center are good resources to utilize. · Avoid contractions. · Avoid acronyms that the common person would not know (this is especially true for military applicants). Qualities to Portray · Maturity · Reflectiveness · Honesty and integrity · Clarity of thought · Passion · Individuality · Positivity · Logic · Distinctiveness · Commitment · Ability to relate to diverse people · Insight into the chosen health profession · Compassion and empathy · Genuineness and sincerity · Leadership · Insightfulness · A realistic perspective · Lessons learned · Self-awareness Themes to Avoid · Clichés: Avoid starting a statement with a famous quote or with cliché’ filler statements like: “I want to be a PA because I like science and I want to help people...” “Ever since I was five I played with my mom/dad’s doctor’s kit..” “I loved to play the game Operation as a child and that sparked my desire to be a PA...” “As I watched my beloved family member pass away, I knew then I wanted to be a PA...” · Restating your resume’: We have already read the majority of your application up to this point, so do not retell your life story again. · Story Time: Limit your personal stories about a patient or incident in the clinic to ONE no more than TWO. The statement should focus more the topics mentioned above. · The “epiphany into medicine”: Your pursuit of the PA profession should be based on your adult experiences up until this point, NOT an instantaneous realization. · Manifest Destiny: You have not always known you want to be a PA and the fact that someone tells you “you’ll make a great PA one day” does not justify why you should be a PA. · Grandiosity: Claiming that you plan to eliminate all the healthcare problems in an area is not realistic and shows a grave lack of understanding of the profession. · The “humble brag”: Of course you’re special, but claiming “you probably do not see many applicants like me” is not only arrogant, but is likely untrue. We’ve seen it all! · Remember your audience: Remember people do have other biases and views that may not agree with yours so avoid controversial topics and statements that could offend someone. Also, remember the admissions committee can be made up of all types of members of the healthcare team. Avoid statements like “I want to be a PA because PAs spend more time with their patients in comparison to physicians.” These types of situations are not always true and you do not want to stereotype an entire profession when you’ve only been around .00000001% of them. · “I am a victim”: Victims are never attractive applicants and any difficulties along the way should be dispassionately addressed. These explanations should be brief and also address what you have done to overcome the situation and what you learned from it. · Excuses: Never, ever blame anyone else for difficulties in your life or academic career. Topsy's 2 cents: Show, don't tell. Don't tell me you're great at multitasking. Show me! Describe it instead: "Despite having to care for my ailing mother at home, work the graveyard shift at the hospital, and help victims of abuse at the women's shelter, I still managed to keep my by grades by merely studying instead of sleeping." What makes the PA profession personally meaningful to you. Do not reiterate catch phrases like autonomy, flexibility, and all those other words that you can find on countless websites/blogs. Do mention personal things you've seen! Like the time you shadowed a PA talking to a family who was strapped for cash, and the PA was sensitive and attentive enough to notice the dilemma and was kind enough to provide their family with ample samples. Again, show, don't tell. Overall, a great personal state can be achieved by getting the reader think - yes. I want to meet the person who wrote this.
    25 points
  9. Last week I got my first official application decision of the cycle. Opening the email, I scanned the words frantically until I found the sentence I was fearing the most. It read, “I regret to inform you of the program’s decision not to pursue your application further.” These words translate much more simply to “rejection.” For a moment I felt like I couldn’t breathe. I knew that I would be receiving rejections throughout the cycle, but had hoped and prayed it wouldn’t be from this school. Not only was this program one of my top choices, but it is also the only school in my home city. The realization that I would not have the opportunity to interview hit me like a ton of bricks. With GPAs well above the program’s average and my state residency giving me a leg up over other applicants, I felt that I would likely secure an interview. I was wrong. After the news, I began to question my application strategy entirely. I chose to apply more intentionally to a handful of carefully selected programs landing on the lower side of things - 6. As the September 1st deadline for many programs was only a few days away I sent my GRE scores off to an additional school that I was going back and forth on, hoping that they would arrive on time. I was relieved to have everything complete with one other program, but I still questioned if 7 would be enough to land me an acceptance or even an interview. At this point I was doubting myself, my personal statement, my clinical experiences… everything. I wondered if there were red flags in my application or if I said the wrong things in the answers to the supplemental questions. I tried to stay optimistic, but I was disappointed and feeling insecure. My first rejection was certainly humbling, planting seeds of doubt that were becoming overwhelming. And then I saw it. I was eating my lunch and scanning my email when I suddenly read “Invitation to Interview” in the subject line of an email from my top choice. My heart started racing and my palms were sweating. After seeing the date provided, only 3.5 weeks away, I could barely focus enough to read about the interview details. I was ecstatic. Their initial email contained a typo and in a follow up email with a correction the admissions director revealed that I was the very first applicant to be offered an interview. I couldn’t believe it. This school was my reach, and I certainly wasn’t counting on being offered an interview, let alone the first one. I was over the moon. Here I am now, in the midst of the cycle with one interview scheduled and one rejection. Things are still up in the air, but I feel that I am at least back in the game. The ups and downs of this roller coaster ride will continue, and I couldn't be happier. Thus far, this process has been unpredictable. Although I have heard this repeated many times here by those wiser than myself, this experience has definitely shown me that there is no such thing as a sure thing when applying to PA school. Don’t be so quick to count yourself in, but also don’t count yourself out.
    25 points
  10. Live look at all applicants frantically refreshing their emails daily waiting on Tampa interview email
    24 points
  11. Hey all! First year PA student here. I didn’t hear about an interview until 9/23/19 and they gave us four days in October to choose from. With COVID, idk what that means for you guys but thought I’d share the process. Good luck! If anyone has any questions about anything feel free to ask!
    23 points
  12. I wanted to make a very brief and to-the-point case for a new title: Medical Practitioner. As a profession what we need more than ever is our own path. * How do we separate ourselves from NPs? Well, the biggest thing is that we practice medicine within the medical model. * How do we separate ourselves from Physicians? Well, we aren't physicians and did not train as one, but we still practice medicine. My point is that Medical Practitioner not only describes what we do perfectly, but it gives us our own path. We can say we are a practitioner just like NPs, but we practice in the medical model. We can say that we practice medicine similar to Physicians, but our training was more accelerated and we did not attend a full residency, and therefore we are practitioners.
    23 points
  13. This is my reponse to the ACEP current Presidents response to comments in this months issue of Emergency Physician Monthly. I will list the link at the end. February 28, 2021 Dr. Rosenberg, I read your most recent interview in EP Monthly with great interest. You and I can agree that emergency medicine has changed in ways that none of us expected during the current pandemic. Who would have thought the ED volumes would drop to such a degree as to lead to layoffs and furloughs of EM physicians, PAs, and NPs. I have no doubt that these trends will turn around in time. There are a few points you made in your article that I would like to address. You state that the #2 problem in emergency medicine is the utilization of APPs, “the nonphysician providers are constantly saying they’re cheaper than we are, and they can do our job.” You go on to state, “When we look at the workforce and when we look at the job opportunities and we look at rural emergency medicine, and rural is almost every state in the country, has some rural challenges and western Texas is obviously very different than northern Maine, but nonetheless, many similar challenges. In those rural areas, we have PAs in Maine that have independent practice. We have nurse practitioners in other states that have independent practice. And we have primary care physicians who are working in many of these locations who don’t have access to resources from ACEP. And yet, we at ACEP consider ourselves the gold standard of board-certified residency trained emergency physicians.” This is the statement that deserves unpacking. I am a solo emergency medicine PA covering multiple rural critical access emergency departments in northern Maine. PA’s in Maine do not have “independent practice”. We have a system of graduated autonomy that is based on practice setting and years of experience of the PA. The final determination of the level of autonomy is at the practice level between the PA and the MD/DO. This allows for greater utilization of the highly skilled PA workforce. This makes far more sense than a “one size fits all” model created by the state. NP’s are the only “APP” that have successfully achieved fully independent practice in 28 states. ACEP is doing itself a disservice by refusing to recognize the difference in training and the mission behind the PA and the NP. There is a remarkable difference and the persistent use of the term “APP” or “Mid-level” is simply lazy. I began my medical career as a Navy Corpsman, then 10 years as a Paramedic and finally I achieved my goal which was to become a PA. After completion of PA school, I elected to do a 12-month emergency medicine PA residency program. Fast forward to today, I have been practicing as a PA for 15 years, I have over 30,000 practice hours in the ER and have treated more than 80,000 patients. I have worked in just about every ER setting, from large urban academic ERs to small critical access ERs. I have seen the misuse and abuse of the PA and I have had the pleasure to work in areas where the MD and the PA were truly a respectful and collegial team. In your interview you seem to attack the notion of PAs and even non-ACEP trained physicians covering these rural critical access ERs in areas like northern Maine and west Texas. I am disturbed by this. Is there evidence that a disservice has been done? You have presented yourself as the “gold-standard” of emergency care. This may be true, but it does not mean that safe and excellent emergency care cannot be provided by non-ACEP trained providers. There is no data to support this insinuation. What are these areas to do when ACEP trained MD’s do not want to live in these very rural areas, much less work there at what they can afford to pay? An ACEP trained MD has loans to repay and vastly most choose to work in large urban ER’s where they are paid much higher and have far greater back up and support. When I speak to physicians at the larger regional hospital here in Maine where we transfer our sicker patients and those who need any specialist, they have frequently thanked me for being out here. They have said to me “I don’t want to go out there, you don’t have much support or backup.” So, who is going to come out here? If the ACEP MD is not, then who? Rural America still accounts for tens of millions of people who are sick, getting sicker and have the fewest resources. I was excited to see you mention the power of telehealth. Let me tell you, I believe that I have seen the future of the ACEP MD, and it is telehealth. At one of the remote facilities I cover, we have an ED telehealth relationship with Dartmouth. It is an incredible and awesome service. In the trauma bay we have a full telehealth set up with monitor and microphones and a large red button on the wall. If I have a patient I need to consult on, all I must do is hit the button and I have an ACEP MD in the room with me. It may be a trauma, it may be a complicated septic patient, whatever it is, they are there like an angel on my shoulder. At that point I become their hands and together we deliver the best medical care possible in these austere and rural settings. If ACEP wants to remain relevant in rural America, this is how you do it. The PAs are on the front line because there is no physical way for there to be enough ACEP MDs to cover the need in rural America. But through “force multiplication” with systems like what Dartmouth is doing, ACEP can expand its abilities to be available and provide that guidance in the areas where they are most needed. ACEP MDs are not needed in large urban ER’s where you have 5 MDs on at a time. They are needed out here where you have 1 MD for 100 square miles. I would like to thank you for taking the time to read this and I apologize if I strayed at times. But I felt compelled to respond. I ask ACEP to stop fostering the attitude that PAs are a problem, we do not want your job. But we do want the right and respect to walk beside you. I will close with this personal story. On the first day of my PA EM residency program, I introduced myself to my attending, a retired Army Colonel; “Hi my name is Rob I am one of the new PA residents.” His only response was “I don’t care if you are a PA, I will hold you to the same standard I hold my residents. There is only one standard of care in medicine and if you can’t handle that, get the hell out of my ER.” That statement shaped my career. Respectfully, Robert D. Booth, MSPAS, EMPA-C, CAQ-EM ‘The Future of Emergency Medicine is Bright’ (epmonthly.com)
    22 points
  14. Here's my insight: The time to question if you should have joined the Army is not when you're in a landing craft and heading towards the Normandy beaches! Finish this one term! Honor your dream that much. Commit to doing the best you can for that long, whatever your best turns out to be. Go to your school's learning center and see what they have to say about your learning style. I personally got punched in the mouth by my first two tests in gross anatomy. And I was 58 years old with two challenging masters degrees already under my belt. I decided that I just wanted to stay and get a chance to see what would happen next. I followed the motto of "improvise, adapt, and overcome." I tried different learning techniques in almost every class and settled on what worked best for me. When the term was over, nothing felt better then pegging my dissection clothes (belt and shoes included) into the dumpster behind my apartment! Maybe you weren't meant to be a PA -- who knows? -- but now is not the time to dwell on that. I'm all for cutting ones losses when necessary but, even if you ultimately decide change your career direction, don't do it now or you'll always think of yourself as someone who flinched when the going got rough. You have been through a lot to get this far and now you need to prove to yourself that you can do anything for a term. Stop dwelling on job ads, the people back home, and ruminations about your desire to study. Tough it out for ONE FULL term and THEN you can see what you want to do. Good luck!
    22 points
  15. Now that I’ve collected my thoughts, I got an email that I was taken off the waitlist yesterday! Interviewed 9/22, waitlisted 9/29, offer of admission 10/18. I’m shocked. This was my third year applying, first time interviewing at Duke, and first acceptance I’ve ever received, and it’s from the best program in the nation!? After so many rejections and heartache...
    21 points
  16. Hello everyone! I am a current first year at MBKU (I also have a pre-PA IG, @whitecoatchasing) to give you all a little context, I submitted August 25th, received an interview November 6th, interviewed December 7th and was accepted December 10th! I wish you all the best of luck
    21 points
  17. Just a little piece of advice no one asked for, but I will share. On the day I was accepted, many got calls in the morning. I did not. I crumbled. I was devastated and cried for hours. Emailed my counselor, and I skipped out on a meeting I had planned on Zoom for something. I was thinking about what this meant for me and my kids and my future and how everything was about to shift and I had to re-group (yes, my mind was a day full of run-on sentences). I spent all day reading this forum and freaking out. Then in the evening, the forum picked up again and still no call for me. As soon as I began to feel proud of myself and think about how I will make this "rejection" a positive in my life and will find a new path and will make it no matter what is when I felt better. I smiled! I was proud of myself and getting it this far. I decided it was 6 pm on the west coast and 9 pm on the east coast, so it was time for me to call it a night and be happy and go for a walk. What would be would be. As soon as I turned off my computer and set my phone aside....my phone rang!!! I couldn't believe it. I was Accepted! I learned a lesson that day. The forum is fantastic, and everyone is so supportive, and it is nice to get information and comfort. On the flip side, it becomes an obsession and may be toxic. I had a horrible mental health day because I kept comparing my journey to others. Again, no one asked for this story, but I will leave it here. Interpret it as you will, and maybe it will make you revisit your actions during the day. Don't let the forum decide how the rest of your day will be like. YOU have the power to determine how you feel and proceed. Rooting for you all and hope to meet many of you next year!
    21 points
  18. All is right in this world. Accepted into Emory University. I am done with this forum for now...everyone aspiring to get into PA school it took me four cycles. LETS GO.
    21 points
  19. So I need to keep this a bit vague, but interesting story. I had a pt recently with a significant traumatic injury who was not appropriate to keep at my rural , critical access hospital. I called one of the regional trauma ctrs(on a recorded line) and got a physician on the phone who is well known for not liking PAs. I presented a straightforward case about wanting to transfer the pt to a higher level of care for surgical evaluation and possible intervention. The physician started giving me the third degree and telling me how this was an inappropriate transfer because "most people with this injury don't require operative intervention". I pointed out that I was in a very small ED with minimal resources for trauma more than an hour away from a facility with a trauma surgeon. the physician told me to "talk to my IR department" to which I responded that we don't have one. I told the doc 5 or 6 times: the staff here is me, a handful of nurses, an xray tech, a lab tech, and an on-call fp physician who would never consider admitting a pt for observation of this particular injury. the doc then said" well let me talk to the ED physician then because you are just the PA". repeat of prior conversation. I had to resort to mentioning I knew the chief of trauma at the facility in question and they had asked me to send this type of pt to them before. after a 10 min conversation that should have lasted 2, the doc accepted the transfer. after they got off the recorded line, the transfer coordinator still on the line started apologizing. the next day I got a call from the chief medical officer of that hospital, who said he had reviewed the recording, apologized and assured me I would not have to deal with that behavior again. EM PA 1, Asshat surgeon zero. about time. behavior like this surgeon's used to be standard practice. this surgeon hit every benchmark for being the stereotypical surgeon during our call. they were belittling, condescending, and dismissive of my request, mostly because I was a PA. glad someone finally decided that this was not acceptable behavior. I did not need help making the decision to transfer. this was not a request for consult. I know my resources and knew this pt could quickly exceed them. I think this is probably the first time in 31 years that I have ever gotten an apology about this kind of behavior. maybe things are looking up.
    21 points
  20. If it makes you feel better, we are not alone - in addition to killing PAs, NPs are killing a lot of patients, too.
    21 points
  21. ACCEPTED TO ARCADIA UNIVERSITY!!!!! Holy sh*t best day of my life. You all are next, I can’t wait to meet all of you amazing individuals!!
    20 points
  22. To all prePA applicants, I am a recent graduate from this program and just passed my boards! I am writing in here because I remember stalking and refreshing this website everyday/hour. By now, some of you have been accepted and congratulations! Others are still waiting and some may be denied. Whatever the case may be, I encourage you to continue to pursue your dreams no matter how hard it is to get it! Back in 2015, I posted in one of the forum threads about to give up on being a PA but people in here encouraged me to keep going trying. The only reason why I was going to give up was because I applied to PA school 7 times already. Yes. SEVEN times before I got in. I graduated with an undergrad GPA of 2.45. Yes. 2.45! But since then I've worked my butt off to achieve my dreams. So whatever your results may be, please know you are going into a great profession and persistence will pay off!! Also be patient with the school/faculty as interview process is a lot of work for them. I was the last person of my cohort to be accepted. I was accepted off the waitlist as the last person and was not accepted till the FIRST DAY OF ORIENTATION (meaning school technically already started). I walked into that classroom saying "hi everyone! I was just accepted 3 hours ago!". So my message here to you all is to keep trying and that rejections don't mean the end of the world! Good luck and congrats to those that have been accepted!
    20 points
  23. Hey guys, My name is Logan and I am a new first year at the University of Florida. It wasn't long ago at all that I was sitting where you are sitting, knee deep in the application journey for PA school. I have compiled a list of things which opened my eyes to the application process after having been through it twice, as well as things I wish I had known going into the process which I think would've helped me be better prepared. A little background on me-- I got my degree in Athletic Training at Nova Southeastern University in Florida, where I was SUPER involved in extracurriculars and leadership positions (multiple leadership positions in my fraternity, ATSO, Order of Omega, Up 'Til Dawn, research, etc) plus employed on campus. Because I was so involved, my grades suffered and I ended up graduating with a 3.4 cumulative GPA and a 3.28 science GPA... Not great. Through my undergrad being in a medical field, I also had a bunch of rotation hours to list on my resume. Immediately after graduation I had a bit of an identity crisis not knowing fully yet what I wanted to do "when I grew up", I went straight into paramedic school to gain added experience and buy time to figure out my future. I applied to the CASPA for the first time in 2015 straight out of medic school and, as you probably picked up, didn't get in. As a matter of fact, I didn't even get an interview... anywhere. Devastated, I decided to get a change of pace and uprooted my life to transplant somewhere else and busted ass working. I also identified that a couple of my science classes were a weak spot on my application, so I re-took them. I took a year off from applying and in 2017 I applied to 12 schools, was extended an interview at 9, and accepted at 6. Here is my list of things I have picked up along the way, and tips for you moving forward. When Applying: Apply Early!!! I know everyone says this but trust me, if you can beat the crowd, even if your application is meh, you may still be a shining star out of the small percentage to take this advice. Your chances of getting an interview is significantly higher the earlier you apply, especially if the program has rolling admissions. Get your application busted out literally as soon as possible, spend a short time reviewing everything, and start submitting them quick. If you are reading this now (posted at the end of June) and you haven't started submitting (or are close to submitting save for some last minute tweaking) yet, you are behind the ball. Get on it!! Apply Everywhere Make a list of literally every school (in the WHOLE US) you qualify for by the minimum standards (GPA, GRE scores, Class Prereqs). Yes, this is time intensive but there are books that can help you outline each program and their requirements. Once you have the expansive list of programs which you could theoretically get in to, cross out the ones which you would not accept even if you were given an acceptance. For me, it was anywhere with too cold of a winter (true southerner and have been in Florida for the last 9 years... 60 is chilly for me, lol). Keep narrowing your list till you get to between 10 and 15 schools. Obviously if you are a perfect applicant with a 4.0 GPA, incredible GRE scores, tons of patient contact, and a resume a mile long with achievements; you can have a shorter list... but since most people reading this don't have the "perfect" application, it is better to cast the net wide. Also- Just because a school says it will accept outstanding prereqs, doesn't mean in reality it will. Why should they take 1 incomplete package when they have thousands of others who offer the total package. Save your money and keep looking. Once you decide what schools you are applying to, make a folder on your computer dedicated to just that school. ex- "PA School Applications" > "University of Florida". Inside that folder, have every document pertaining to that school you can get. Any pertinent research you stumble across, all your essays, a copy of your supplemental application, etc.... You will be happy you did that when it is time to research for your interview. Save Up Money It is incredible how expensive the application process is, and not something I expected when I initially applied. The CASPA applications are expensive, especially for as many schools as you should be applying to. Then you have to worry about Secondary applications. Then when you start getting interview invites you need to pay for travel and the hotel, plus food, etc. It all adds up quick, especially if you have multiple interviews back to back in different states. Plan for it financially and it will be a HUGE weight off your shoulders when the time comes. Assuming you get in somewhere, then you have the seat deposit which is usually between $500 and $1000 - some more, some less. Make Sure Your Application is "Perfect" Before Submitting Every applicant gets the same baseline question... "Why Do You Want to be a PA". Every applicant is going to have a lot of (boring) similarities in their answer which the AdComm is going to read THOUSANDS of times before the cycle closes. Don't waste your one shot at giving them a glimpse into your personality and a reason to admit you. Show your passion for the profession without being cliche and highlight your achievements without sounding cocky or pretentious. PEER REVIEW THE HELL OUT OF IT. Like literally send it to all your friends who can write well. Send it to your high school or college lit professors. Send it to your career services department. Legitimately send it to anyone who will read it and give you honest feedback. Tell them to rip it apart grammatically, and offer them the option to tell you it sucks or put them to sleep. Kick your feelings and pride out the door for this one, if your essay sucks, you will not get an interview anywhere. Period. Once you have your essay as perfect as you think you can get it, hire a service to review it. I used myPAresource.com for my personal statement which was an incredible resource for the personal statement only. The give you line by line suggestions and edits and are ridiculously thorough. Once I got that back and had the rest of my application completed (all the other tabs on CASPA) I used www.mypatraining.com/applying-pa-school-coaching/ to have Paul rip apart the rest of my application to tweak the other parts (the little details you may have overlooked which could damage the overall application). Both services cost money, but were 10,000,000,000,000% worth it in my opinion. It is an investment in your future -- can you really afford to re-apply (again), and also miss out on another year of PA-C pay? Be Smart About Your References!!! A phenomenal recommendation from a PA-C in a small clinic in a town no one has ever heard of, who you have known for 8 years, ALWAYS trumps a mediocre recommendation from a big name in medicine who doesn't really know you well at all. The recommendation letters are a MAJOR factor in the AdComm's decision making process, and I had my letters mentioned in almost every interview I went to. Pick your people wisely, it really does make all the difference in the world. Pick people who know you well, have history working with you, and who think highly of you. Get Experience Get lots of it. Everywhere you can. Volunteering is YUUUGGEEEE in applications. if you have a lot of it, you will stand out. Do something where you are actually putting hands on patients. Looks better on paper and also helps build your bedside manor. EMT / CNA / Surgical Tech, etc are all great experiences (and extremely easy / short classes). Being a scribe is ookkkkkaaaaayyyyyyyyyyyyyy... but doesn't actually place any responsibility on you except being the provider's lap dog. Once Your Applications Are Submitted: Take a breath, but don't stop being great! The most labor intensive part of applying is done. Now it is just the waiting game which is killer. Use this time to keep bettering your application. Put in OT at work, Volunteer regularly, Re-take classes, etc. Most programs predict your future hour calculations based on the numbers you provide in your applications. You can go back in and add new experiences to your CASPA applications which some programs care about, others don't. When you do major things, shoot the point of contact for the program an e-mail or call the program to update them. Each program gets several thousands of applicants each cycle and although they wish they had a warehouse of people working around the clock to filter through applications and answer questions, most of the time it is just a few people doing everything. DON'T BUG THEM. Imagine if you had 3,000 people constantly e-mailing you and calling you at work... you'd never get anything done... don't be "that guy". Only update for the major things, and save the rest for the interview. DON'T BASE YOUR TIMELINE OFF ANYONE ELSE!!!! This forum is great for getting information... and also for causing anxiety attacks. I applied to UF within the first few weeks of the application being open and interviewed in one of the last groups and was almost immediately accepted following the interview. Don't lose hope till you get that e-mail or letter saying "thank you for applying but kick rocks". Time doesn't always equate to standing in their system. Make sure your contact information on CASPA is correct ***AND PROFESSIONAL****. Should go without saying but having inappropriate e-mails or voicemails may be funny in high school, the person trying to contact you for an interview may not find them as funny. You Get Called for an Interview!! Congrats!! It seems like a dream at first and that euphoric feeling proves all your hard work to that point is worth it. Do your happy dance then get back to business, this is where the intensive work begins. RESEARCH THE SCHOOL!!!!!!!!!!!!! I can't put enough emphasis on this. Research the school so well that you and the Dean over the medical programs are practically on a first name basis. Every program has a website where they usually list their achievements, their scores, their faculty / staff, etc. Commit it all to memory. Make a Microsoft Word document dedicated to facts about the school and save it in the folder I mentioned earlier. Include pictures of the faculty and a short bio or things to take notice of. It is okay to creep a little bit (not like looking in their windows, etc)-- but like google their names, get on their Linked-In accounts. Get on the program's Social Media account and creep on that. Look for pictures and clues about the program, its goals and culture, and also about the students and what they are into. What is the mission statement? Does the program do medical missions? To where? Is the program big in the community? Do the students seem like a close knit bunch having a blast or are they indifferent to being there? How involved outside of the classroom are the professors? etc... You can gain a TON of insight by doing a google search of the program and by looking on the program's social media. Use this site and others to figure out what style of interview you are walking into. MMI / Panel / 1 on 1 / Group are all vastly interview styles and require a different preparation. Most of them have a group interview where you are tasked with solving a problem or working as a team on an exercise. Do yourself a favor and stand in the middle of the extremes on this one. This is an exercise to see if you can work and blend in a group setting... Be too aggressive (not knowing when to shut up / interrupting people) and you will be rated as bad as the person who doesn't really contribute anything to the group. Research Yourself!! Intimately know what is on your application and what is on your resume. You are going to get questions drawn directly from your application and resume... be able to recite the major numbers and have the important details readily available. One of the things I goofed pretty bad on in one of my interviews was not reviewing the independent research I had done Freshman and Sophomore year of undergrad... so like 5 years prior to the interview. It was on my application so it was fair game, and when asked about the more intricacies of the study, I blanked... not a good thing to do when sitting in front of the medical director for the program. Re-read your essay and supplemental apps. You may think you know your application pretty well but if you are not fresh on how you phrase things, etc, you may contradict yourself to the person with your essay literally in front of them. Make Smart Travel Plans Murphy's Law is a real thing and is no fun to try to come back from. I suggest always travelling a day in advanced to avoid any last-minute headaches. I was scheduled for an afternoon group on one of my interviews so I figured I would just fly in on the morning of and have like 6 hours to kill before my interview. Save money and time, right?... nope. My 6am flight was delayed due to mechanical failure until 1pm, putting me in the city at 3:30, 30 minutes after my interview was supposed to be. #Stress. It ended up working out okay, the program was understanding and that was one of the programs I ended up getting into... but if you can avoid that situation, save yourself the grey hairs. Go to bed early the night before and try to get good rest. Eat a balanced meal for dinner -- nothing too heavy or greasy. Day of the interview: The Motto of the Day is Calm / Cool / Collected If you let your anxiety get the better of you, you are 100% guaranteed to fail. Breathe... your preparation has done you well. The Morning of the Interview Wake up EARLY... like whatever time you need to get ready and get to the interview site on time (15 - 30 minutes early), wake up an hour before that. Remove any possibility of having to be rushed and your day will start off on the right foot. Eat a [LIGHT] breakfast. This is the food which will be keeping you awake and happy when meeting people, but should not have you in the bathroom every 20 minutes. My usual breakfast was a small amount of scrambled eggs, a small piece of protein (bacon or sausage), toast, and fruit, with water or juice to drink. Avoid dairy or anything too acidic (coffee or orange juice) if you think that will mess up your already anxious stomach. Leave Your Phone in the Car!!! Even checking your phone during the day can indicate boredom or that you are uninterested... appearances are EVERYTHING. If you rest your head, close your eyes, or even glance at your phone you can rest assured that you are on someone's radar for the wrong reasons. When You Get to Campus Everything, I mean EVERYTHING is scrutinized from the moment you get on campus. Your driving through campus to your destination should be impeccable and the second you're out of your vehicle pretend you're on youtube to be watched by the faculty later. Smile and and be literally as friendly as possible without appearing fake. Every interaction is fair game for scrutiny- from the "Good Morning" to the janitor to the conversations with "random" students on campus or your peers... it is all being watched. I know some programs plant people (like cleaning staff, and "random" students) in your path to see how you react around them. I know of other schools who have hidden cameras set up to watch applicants when they are mingling on campus. From the moment you get on campus till the moment you are at home, assume you are being watched and judged. Any "down time" should be spent talking and networking. Get to know your competition, they may soon be your classmates; plus it shows that you are comfortable within a group setting. Also usually helps ease your nerves to be social within a group experiencing the same anxiety you are. During the Interview Have fun with it. You have worked hard to get where you are and this is your chance to shine! Any interview blog you read (and I'm sure you have read most of them to this point) will tell you that body language is BIG... If you are having fun and are relaxed, your body language will show it. Confident but Humble is the name of the game. Own your past mistakes with dignity and be ready to give reasons why they should look past them and see you in a better light Enter the room and greet everyone individually. Firm handshake, eye contact, and a smile. If you know everyone's name that is a big win and can work in your advantage... but if you don't know EVERYONE by name or think you may call someone the wrong name, don't attempt. Make sure to have a couple copies of your resume readily available with you. Most schools wont need or even request it, but it shows you are prepared if you can offer it or produce it on demand. DON'T GET FLUSTERED!!! Some interviewers will ask you questions to try to get under your skin or try to throw you off your game to see how you will react. It is okay to take a moment and think and breathe... they are looking to see you under pressure. Focus on what they are asking and move forward. I once had an interviewer straight up say " I don't think you belong in this program, nothing about you impresses me" as the first thing when I got in the room... She was looking to see how I responded. Don't let anyone get under your skin and maintain your composure... you can breakdown and analyze once the interview is over and you're at home. When You Leave the Interview Make a mental note about your overall impression of the program, staff, and school... if you didn't get a positive vibe, that will come in to play if you get in to multiple programs. You need to go where feels like "home" because for the next 2- 2.5 years, it will be. Realistically speaking, most people don't get into the first school they interview at because they are walking into it not knowing what to expect and are visibly anxious. Prepare for that ahead of time by doing practice interviews and by getting comfortable talking to strangers and you will be ahead of the curve. Everyone says to send "thank you" e-mails... I disagree with their logic... If there are 200 people who interview at a program, every faculty member who interviews will have 200+ emails all saying the same thing "Thank you for taking the time ...............". I personally would get tired of even opening all those emails, so I didn't send them for the most part. The few that I did send I never got a response back from, which just reaffirmed my theory. Better practice would be (if you have time) to stop by their office at some point either later that day or in the following couple days and thank them in person. That opens the door for a more casual conversation and is more genuine, plus in my experience it went over better in general. Last Words of Advice: If you get in to a school early but it isn't your #1... please dear god put the seat deposit down anyway. That means you can breathe a little easier and are for sure going SOMEWHERE for the following year. Don't hold out for your #1 because you are optimistic and not wanting to possibly eat the money. Again... investment in your future. If you are rejected from a program before the interview, it is okay to ask why and try to get them to reconsider their reason if it is bogus. That shows balls, and also commitment to their program. One of the schools I was accepted to initially rejected me saying they wanted all of the anatomy classes from the same university ( I had 1 formal course from Nova along with a ton of other anatomy-based courses, plus 1 formal course from medic school, and another formal course from a community college from the year after I moved). I popped an e-mail back explaining my situation, the program director sided with me and I was immediately granted an interview. If you get rejected after the interview, some schools will offer advice (if asked) on how to improve for the following year... take them up on that offer!!! Programs LOVE repeat applicants, ESPECIALLY if they see significant improvement from the previous application. Lastly, if you get totally rejected and have to reapply, welcome to the club. The majority of successful applicants have that sobering experience and are accepted the next time around. Don't get discouraged, become inspired. Hopefully at least some of you found this list helpful, I know I could've used some of that when I was applying and stressing out. Don't hesitate to reach out to me if you have any questions! Good Luck and Go Gators!! :) Logan
    20 points
  24. Guys....I got the call!!!! Just waiting for follow up administrative emails but I'm so excited to join the crew!
    19 points
  25. Hey everybody!!!! Dylan here, president of the UCDavis PA class of 2021. I'm super excited for all of you guys submitting your CASPAs and getting ready to start your PA journey, whether it be the first time applying or the 50th. You CAN do it! If you are like me, the application/interview process is one of the most stressful times of your life... especially if you don't get in the first time around( it took me two). One of my passions is to help others get through interviewing and into the career of their dreams. Over my time at school and preparing for over 13 interviews I have learned exactly what is necessary to excel in the interview process and have since helped several students get programs around the nation. the If anyone is interested in being a mentee of mine, you are welcome to contact me. Email: hawaiilife93@gmail.com
    19 points
  26. If I had a dollar for every time I checked this forum, then I’d probably have my PA school tuition paid off by now.
    19 points
  27. We will end up being Physician's associate. No one will know we practice medicine. The patient will be like "so you are the physician's associate, where is the physician?" Back to square one. I support Medical Practitioner because: Similar naming style as Medical Doctor. “Medical Doctors and Medical Practitioners working as a team”. It will be easier for patients to understand that relationship. We’re not just here to take blood pressure, height, and weight. We are here to make Medical decisions. It will work internationally like MD because it is easier to translate to different languages when compared with Physician Associate/Assistant. We’re always someone’s Assistant or Associate in any other languages. It will differentiate us from Nurse Practitioners. They practice Advanced Nursing and we practice Medicine. Patient understands what we do just by our name. (This is a very powerful reason. The patient will know we practice medicine because it is in our name) Administrative people will finally understand that we are not someone’s assistant or associate. We practice medicine too and should belong to the boardroom table and day to day decision making. There is no physician or doctor in this name, so by definition, we shouldn't be confused with a physician or a doctor. I will no longer introduce myself with an acronym. I will tell the patient I am a Medical practitioner because it is self-explanatory. When was the last time you heard a Medical doctor introduced themselves as an "MD" to a patient?
    18 points
  28. Honestly there is so much unnecessary negativity in one post. This profession is no different than any other profession in terms of finding and keeping jobs. There are going to be multiple people competing for one job, no matter what profession you are in. You are going to have to search, apply, make yourself stand out during the interview, and make sacrifices, just like lawyers, accountants, teachers, etc. If you do not perform up to the standards, or if another company buys out the hospital, being laid off is a possibility, just like other major corporations. That's how the world works. Let's not isolate the PA profession in saying that it is the only profession that you should "be prepared to be let go" or many people are competing for one job. As with any other career, just because you have a degree does not make you qualified for the job. You need to prove yourself. The absolute negativity in these posts I am reading is truly unbelievable. Healthcare is a booming field, especially these days, so no one will be unemployed for long stretches of time, I don't care what you say. You people focus on "how many PAs and NPs are being produced each year," but do not look at "how many people are retiring per year." Our society is getting older and older, which is going to mean healthcare is soon going to accelerate at a pace faster than what it currently is. There is a reason why 19 of the top 25 jobs in America are in healthcare. There is a reason why NP and PA are 2nd and 3rd, respectively. There is a reason why PA was in the top 5 professions for the past 4 years. These are from multiple articles, not just one source. For those of you having difficulty jobs, location is the key factor. There are places where there are 10 PA and NP programs within a 50 mile radius, pumping out hundreds of PAs and NPs per year. Simple solution, look elsewhere. I can tell you that I am out here in the northeast and there is no shortage of jobs. Lateral movement is common here, people are switching for derm to EM to psych to surgery with no problem. Residency is a plus, but is not absolutely necessary. I work in CT surg and we constantly look for new grads to train. Sorry for the ramble, but I needed to speak up and quiet this negativity. There may be certain locations or instances where what some of you say is true, but you can't blame this on the profession as a whole. Certain locations or specialities may be hard to find jobs, but this isn't true of the PA profession as a whole.
    18 points
  29. I live in a small town in a small county in eastern Iowa. When the Covid vaccines were getting ready to be released to the County Public Health department being on the local Fire Department I had a letter forwarded to me in regards to out First Responders being the first to receive the vaccine. Down at the bottom of the letter was a blurb noting that demand was going to outstrip the vaccination sites. It also suggested that a qualified medical person could apply to set up a satellite vaccination clinic. I'm a Physician Assistant and I applied and was approved. I was able to get all of our EMT/First responders first dose vaccinated two days after the county received the Moderna vaccine.30 days later all were given their second dose. Fast forward to last week. The County Public Heath Nurse called me last week. She explained that the County I live only had one vaccination site. Walmart. The local medical clinics were not giving the vaccine. She said that if they didn't use 80% of their allotment they would lose doses for the next week. She asked me if I would be interested in sponsoring another clinic through the Fire Department. Hell yes I would. She called me Thursday and said she would make 30 doses available but they had too be given to 75 years old and up. She said if I could pull this off she would consider making doses available for this coming week. My wife and I opened the phone book and started calling the people that met the criteria. It was really satisfying to here the joy and relief in their voices that they were going to get a vaccine. We filled up our list in a hour. Most of these people had no access to a computer or the knowledge to go online and make appointment at the CVS or Walmarts. The people that did were driving 50 - 75 miles to the larger cities to get their vaccine. One couple I talked to who were in their 90's paid for a local private ambulance to take them for their shot. So Saturday morning we scheduled from 900-1100. Guess what? they started showing up at 830. We were set up for them and away we went. We were done by 1000. We had one extra dose. I asked the last lady if she knew of someone who needed one. She gave me her number. I called her and asked her if she was interested. Why yes but she was afraid to drive in the ice and snow. No problem, I will come to you. I went to her apartment and gave her the shot. I said I have to stay with you for 10 minutes to monitor for a adverse reaction. As I sat there I learned that she was 91 years old. She was a retired school teacher and lived alone. Her kids were no where around. I did notice some Valentines on a table and commented about them. She said they were from her grandkids except for the one on the end. That one was from her late husband who sent it to her during from Korea during the Korean War. Wow! I almost lost it. I then told her that I would see her in a month. I got up and went to the door and she followed me. She thanked me and gave me a hug. I was on the verge of loosing it by then. Then she said what kind of cookies do Fire Fighters like because she would like to make us some. By then I was a babbling idiot and replied good ones. She said good and I left. I called the County Health Nurse and told her. She said she had her doubts that I could pull it off. I said I would be more then happy to do it again. She said lets start with 50 for Thursday with a strong possibility of another 50 for Friday. I said great! She then said could you do another 50 on Saturday. I said let me see how Thursday goes and I will call you but right now I'm leaning toward yes. She said you got your 50 for Friday. Call me Thursday!!! Our average age of vaccination was 79.9. It was a ggod day. Overall it was a great day to be in medicine. Truly one of the most satisfying days of my 35 years of being a Physician Assistant. Can't wait to do it again!!!
    17 points
  30. Hey everyone. I'm usually more of a lurker/reader versus poster on here, but I wanted to blast out a message real quick. We all understand how stressful and drawn out this process is - especially all the re-applicants out there (shout out - me too). We're all trying to do something big for our futures and for the future of medicine, and as inspiring as it is to get this far and meet other intelligent, qualified, like-minded individuals, it's still difficult to learn that you or someone you know didn't get an initial acceptance. The selection process is tough and we have no idea what quotas the school is trying to fill or even what they're really looking for in each individual applicant. That being said, if you made it this far you clearly stand apart from the rest and have a true calling to this field. Do not be discouraged by the decisions made by the EVMS admissions committee! Please do not feel any less intelligent or worthy just because you were waitlisted or rejected. I know I struggled with this last year, and will struggle with it again this year in the event that I don't get an offer. The bottom line is that we all worked so hard to get where we are and as long as we don't lose sight of our end goal and give up, we will all be successful P.A.'s one day. Stay positive, y'all. -C
    17 points
  31. I couldn’t help myself so I called them and they said we should hear something before 5pm. Also they said that if any of the 120 people decline their interviews they will invite more to make sure they interview a total of 120.
    17 points
  32. Good luck everyone! I bet this will be the week and our wait will be over. No matter what happens, everyone who was awarded an interview has qualifications and skills that would be great attributes as a P.A., I wish there were as many spots as there are great candidates!
    17 points
  33. I'm impressed you have a wife of almost 50 years. No mean feat these days. ?
    17 points
  34. I am dogging this issue to the point of getting a bad rep with admin. I'm not letting this go. The positions weren't advertised within the system as required and qualified candidates were ignored. I also pointed out that it suggests the organization thinks we are all the same which simply isn't true. I may get written up or fired but I am dogging this until I get some answers.
    17 points
  35. Yes. You have one foot in the grave at 27. Focus on the time you have left with your family. Good luck.
    17 points
  36. I had a decent career. Too much to go into, while not perfect I did save a lot of lives along the way. I raised a family which allowed my wife to stay home with the kids and we never went hungry. Overall I had a good run. Over the last few years I have struggled mightily with the direction our profession has chosen to take. PA leadership has embraced the "assistant/associate" mentality instead of taking our last best chance at relevancy by calling ourselves what we actually are: Medical Practitioners. We had every opportunity to embrace it, but after a million bucks and a reputable consulting agencies' hard recommendation to go "Medical Care Practitioners".....PA leadership said no. They essentially walked away from reality, clinging onto some bygone days when we had the job market to ourselves. The real gut punch was PAFT. I really saw them as having a next gen vision for the profession...and then the infamous letter stating that the consultants got it wrong...then the subsequent reversal. It was just awful and the organization will never be respected again. Which is sad because I think Scott who posts here (previous PAFT president) gets it. He understands just how much danger our profession is in. Either way, I give up. I signed an offer letter today taking a non clinical job making less money but I will not be seeing patients. It's a govt job so the benefits are great even with the lower salary. My wife and I had a long talk last night and she essentially begged me to give up clinical medicine. I'm not going to lie, after taking care of people for almost 3 decades she has had a front row seat to the anxiety, depression and all consuming pressure being a health care provider exacts on a person. She said she just can't watch it tear out the last pieces of me, and to please leave it behind us. That was enough to get me over the line. Lots of tears and memories are what's left. I will still post here, but from what I would I guess call an outsiders point of view. I wish all of you and us, nothing but the very best in the days to come. Good luck to us all.
    16 points
  37. I just declined my interview for this saturday. I know many people say this but I really had to think about my decision. I interviewed here last year and completely loved it, Marshall was definitely my top choice. I got accepted to a school closer to home and it only makes sense financially, not to move across the country. Good luck everyone, this is a great school.
    16 points
  38. Not me checking this forum everyday.... Good luck everyone! Thought I'd check in to say still haven't heard anything and hoping for the best
    16 points
  39. I'm just a student, so apologies if I've stepped out of my lane. However, the more thought I give to MCP, it doesn't seem so bad. What comes to mind are other generic title acronyms like EMT: Emergency Medical Technician. That's a relatively generic name but implies the point "I am a technician that provides emergency medical care". No one second guesses what an EMT is anymore, even if 99% of EMTs do not actually provide emergency medical care. Now, with MCP: "I am a practitioner, who provides xyz medical care"... Medical care is generic as generic gets, but if you lead up to the "medical care" part of the title WITH YOUR SPECIALTY, for example; EM guys/gals - an Emergency Medical Care Practitioner. Ortho folks; Orthopedic Medical Care Practitioner. Urologic medical care practitioner. Cardio-thoracic Medical Care Practitioner. Voluntarily drop the "care" for introductions, if you please, just to streamline the delivery; Emergency Medical Practitioner. Not so bad. Patients will be able to associate the role of "Practitioner" with the type of care provided. I work with a lot of NPs and they don't say "Hey, I am John, the Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner." He is "John, the NP". And I'll tell you what, the vast majority of my patients/family know what an NP is without hesitation, just due to exposure over the years. But a decade ago, when I would make an appt at my PCP and the clerk would say I'm booked for "Cindy the Nurse Practitioner at 4pm", I didn't know wtf a Nurse Practitioner was, but as a patient, I eventually figured it out: someone with a higher level of education who can prescribe me those Abx jawns, and that's all I cared about. Some patients may be perturbed by hearing "assistant." However, toss out "assistant" for "practitioner" and I guarantee nobody will think twice about it. "Practitioner" is common tongue and associated with some "advanced medical care person". To the lay person, "Assistant" has never and will never be associated with anything "advanced", regardless if you tell them 1000 times that PA's are advanced. Critical thinking is slim pickings. At the end of the day, most patients just want to be treated, and treated well. If you screw up, it doesn't matter what your title is... MD, RN, Plumber... they'll remember you and associate you with shit care until the day they die. Be a GOOD MCP --> win patient trust --> make hospital admins happy --> everyone that matters is happy. I think the name change should be dealt with swiftly and attention turned back to bigger fish like FPA and rebuilding that relationship with the VA. Also, maybe the AAPA and AMA can find common ground in combating the NP creep. MCPs and MDs can be a unified force, instead of belligerents in a three-sided war. We need docs, and docs need us, but the idea that mid-levels can replace docs is dangerous. Forums like SDN and /r/residency can spread all the hate they want about NPs, but PAs (MCPs) should do all they can do avoid that negative attention. Some of you may think anecdotal rhetoric on internet forums/social media is nonsense and shouldn't be used as a metric to gauge the bigger picture... but this is the internet age, where platforms like reddit/twitter and forum boards influence millions upon millions of opinions, even swaying national elections. As a student, it disheartening to hear some of you consider jumping ship to NP. Honestly, that's not even a lateral transfer, its a downgrade. If you're so hell bent on being a completely independent clinician, go to med school. NPs have a healthy head start, but that gap can be closed. While we argue over semantics of MCP, the NPs conquer entire states and with them thousands of jobs. Time to move forward, quickly.
    16 points
  40. So, I’ve had some job upheavals lately, and I think there are some good enough reasons to share in terms of lessons learned: First, in late summer I was prepared to move to rural Alaska, where I’d been doing short-term Locums work before, with excellent rapport with the staff and patients. This is for a non-profit FQHC, but not a native corporation. I was offered a salary at the 25th percentile; I countered with agreeing to that salary... if converted to hourly and non-exempt. They said “no, we don’t do that” and offered a 50th percentile package instead, which I agreed to. The week after that, the CEO texts me to tell me that he has been let go by the board, and HR confirms my (signed) offer is “on hold” Cue essentially a month of silence, but before they actually confirm that they’re looking elsewhere for a cheaper provider, I hear of this through headhunters with whom I have a preexisting relationship. Cue some more weeks of waiting, and I am paid a modest settlement for their reneging on a signed offer for no particularly good reason. My house, for what it’s worth, is still partially packed up for the Alaskan move. Observation #1: Most nonprofits are managed incompetently. Do not expect them to know how to negotiate, or to be able to follow through with what has been negotiated. So, I un-resign from my various Washington jobs, but a few weeks later, my family/occ med job fires me via email, with the stated justification that I refused to see patients... which were scheduled outside my working hours. Flimsy, stupid pretext, but not an overtly discriminatory one, but neither was it one that attacked my patient care. So, this is a consistent, ~20 hr/week job, so I need to replace that income, because I can’t keep paying all the bills JUST on my eating disorders 1099 job. Signs I should have seen this coming? MD proprietor had fired the practice manager without a replacement, MA who’d been with this doc for 30 years quit on the basis of how the practice manager was treated, NP in talks with the doc to buy the practice. Observation #2: Sometimes, making money hand-over-fist for the practice isn’t enough to keep your job secure. So, I bit the bullet and let my extended networks know I had been fired—first time in my life, BTW: almost made it to 50 without being fired. Ended up with 3 leads inside 48 hours, had a signed offer letter in 9 days from an interventional pain clinic, which actually offered full time, but I’m doing 2-3 days/week through the end of the year, at pretty much the same pay I was getting in family/occ med... and they’re letting my long-term occ med patients continue to see me. Observation #3: Sometimes, having a diverse “box checking” CV is really helpful. Observation #4: Networking is life. Things that I believe helped me slide over into interventional pain: previous experience with tapering opiates for high-MED occ med patients, DEA X-waiver in hand, point of care ultrasound and joint injection experience, and that I’ve been credentialed multiple times with all the major local insurances through my various jobs--In addition to the family/occ med from which I’d been fired by email and the eating disorders work I mentioned, I fill in at a sleep center occasionally. They needed someone because their current PA is taking a VA job, and someone in my network knew that. So, in my experience, switching specialties is easiest to do when the specialties overlap in practice, if not so much in theory. Family med at first, then adding occupational med in year 3 of practice, adding sleep med in year 5, moving into eating disorders in year 7, and now interventional pain in year 8. Each employment shift brought my existing practice to bear, and yet prompted me to add something new to the toolbox. Observation #5: Maintaining a situation where you can “walk away” from a toxic employment environment if necessary is a matter of perpetual CV polishing and personal readiness. Just when you think you have everything balanced well for you, something, somewhere, changes: The SP you love retires and closes his practice. A practice implodes due to mismanagement. Covid-19 hits. Keeping a strong CV, staying debt free, keeping multiple state licenses, keeping up on your “merit badges” like ACLS, and not being dependent on any employer’s benefit packages are also keys to minimal family disruption during an unexpected job change.
    16 points
  41. I got an interview!!! I’m literally crying at work because I’m a 4th time reapplicant...never give up you guys!! I applied mid May 2020
    16 points
  42. For anyone who closely follows this and other threads comparing yourself to others and getting panicked when you don't get that phone call on the day/hour you were expecting: I get it. It's extremely hard to get a type A applicant to desensitize to the idea of having to trust the process and be willing to give up a locus of control; however, whenever you do learn to do so, you'll enjoy the process and appreciate your fellow applicants and their own victories much, much more. Do not panic, do not wish failure upon your peers, and do not despair or give up until you've gotten that final rejection -- even then, don't give up... PA programs love an applicant with some grit and a positive attitude. I am not writing this because an act of providence has occurred and I am reeling from the high that is an acceptance to PA School -- on the contrary, I received a rejection and a waitlist today (no acceptances thus far, in fact) -- I just want everyone to know that they aren't alone in this process, what they are feeling is natural, and that it's all gonna work out in due time.
    16 points
  43. Hi! I am currently a first year at the program here at UT Health! As you can imagine, our experience has been a little bit different than years prior due to COVID, but I can let you know my experience so far. 1) This program is so special. You have one of the smallest class sizes in Texas, so you really get to know your classmates and professors which is so valuable in this profession. Additionally, you don't sacrifice small class sizes for small resources, because our program is part of the very well established UT Health system along with the medical, nursing, PT, RT, dental schools etc. The facilities are great and you are right next to University Hospital where you may have a few rotations at. San Antonio is a great city, so it is really a joy to get to learn here even though everything is closed now due to COVID, but when things pick back up, there is so much to do/see. In my opinion, the BEST thing about this program that no other school in Texas does is that it gives you FIVE elective rotations. Thats 5 rotations to do whatever type of specialty you want. This is so invaluable when figuring out exactly what type of medicine you want do and also when applying for jobs or residencies, if you have experience in these areas of interest before applying. The faculty does such a good job at picking people for their cohort; truly everyone I met is so intelligent, kind and is here for the right reasons. There is no spirit of competitiveness (you only compete with yourself), and we all collaborate and share resources. Very different from undergrad! 2) You have just about all the resources any other school has, and maybe then some. I'm honestly not sure about tutoring centers... I think if you get into this program its sort of expected that you are competent enough as to be able to study on your own (considering you made it this far in your academic career), but there is definitely office hours, open lab, and plenty of student orgs. You also get to do your own cadaver dissection which is cool (if you guys will be in person). We do inter-professional education here too, which is pretty unique to this program. You can do student government too. 3) A typical day in PA school is pretty hard. You're in class anywhere from 4-8 hours everyday. Basically wake, eat, go to class, study, sleep repeat. Some people that really really have their stuff together (or are okay with compromising grades for better balance) can have a little bit more free time. In PA school there are very busy weeks and then super busy weeks. However, everyone says didactic is the most grueling part, so if you can put up with being exhausted for one year, then you will make it to clinicals which are more exciting (but still a lot of work). On the bright side, our program has some of the highest PANCE pass rates in Texas so all that exhaustion pays off in the end. And we still find time to have fun and hang out with each other after exams! With COVID, all of our classes are online except for clinical skills and patient evaluation (which you have to be in person for). Some people really like it that way, some people hate it -- I really don't think it makes a difference in the quality of the education, its just harder to focus at home sometimes, but we are hoping we won't be like this for too much longer. Hope this helps!
    16 points
  44. So did I. I was offered an acceptance as well
    16 points
  45. For anyone struggling with doubt or fear, just remember that stats and numbers are just LOOSE FRAMEWORKS by which applications are gauged, they are not the law. This site, and others like it, should help to inform you and your application process, but should not serve to set a bar by which to judge yourself or others. We will all end up where we need to be, we just need to trust the process!
    16 points
  46. Big News for OTP in North Dakota Posted about 12 hours ago by Jay Metzger NDAPA Members, The ND Academy of PAs Board of Directors is thrilled to pass on some important news from our meeting with ND Board of Medicine (NDBOM) last Friday. The NDAPA has been working with the NDBOM on achieving Optimal Team Practice (OTP) for PAs and at their meeting on Friday, the NDBOM unanimously approved to support PAs in the upcoming legislative session in our efforts! Specifically, the NDAPA is pursuing the following: Supervisory agreements currently mandatory for licensure in North Dakota will no longer be required. This means that PA’s will be responsible for the care they provide and the need to have a supervising physician will no longer be necessary. This is a HUGE change for our practices and profession. It better aligns us in practice for those employers that don’t even consider PAs due to supervisory issues. The NDAPA and PAs in North Dakota will still do what they have always done and practice in the team model. We are not looking to be “independent providers”, rather we want to be able to practice where we are needed. One concession that was a deal-breaker for the NDBOM was that PAs would need to practice at clinics, hospitals and physician offices that are established or meet certain criteria. The NDBOM concern was that PAs would pursue privately owned clinics for things such as cosmetic dermatology, medi-spas, etc. A PA may still be able to operate a clinic or practice of their own but would need approval from the NDBOM to do so. This concession was felt to be a reasonable request as we are trying to get PAs in areas that need providers in primary care. If we are able to get this legislation passed through the legislature, North Dakota will be the first in the nation where a PA can practice medicine without a supervisory or collaborative agreement with a physician. So what it is next? We are waiting to hear back from the ND Medical Association on whether they will also support us in our efforts. Their board meets at the beginning of December. Their support would be a phenomenal step towards our end goals. We are finalizing the proposed legislation and are seeking sponsors in the ND Legislature. We have a few names that will likely be willing, but if you know of any legislators that would be willing to do so, please let us know. In the next week or two, we will be sending out a form for signatures of support from physicians in ND. This form will be sent to all PAs in ND. This is where we need your help: find physicians that are in support of these changes and have them commit to their support by signing the form. Once we have a submitted bill, we will need all PAs to contact their local legislators and let them who we are and what this legislation would mean for the people of their districts and PAs in ND. We will keep you informed of our progress and please let us know if you have any questions or ideas (jay.metzger@med.und.edu or cell #701-361-4074) . Have a great week and Happy Thanksgiving! Jay R. Metzger, PA-C President, NDAPA
    16 points
  47. HI all, I am the one who is behind the GFU doctorate and there is good reason for correcting this issue. First, you need to understand that academic awards are based on regional accreditation. Here is what the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities states: Degree Levels Associate A lower division undergraduate degree normally representing two years (approximately 60 semester credits or 90 quarter units) of lower‐division collegiate study, or its equivalent in depth and quality of learning experience. Baccalaureate An undergraduate degree normally representing four years (approximately 120 semester credits or 180 quarter credits) of upper‐ and lower‐division collegiate study, or its equivalent in depth and quality of learning experience. Masters A graduate degree representing approximately 30 semester credits or 45 quarter credits of post‐baccalaureate study, or its equivalent in depth and quality. Doctorate A terminal degree representing three or more years [90 SH] of graduate study that prepares the recipient to conduct original research, engage in scholarship, create artistic expressions of human emotions, or apply knowledge to practice. -- The type of degree awarded has nothing to do with the practice as a PA. That is governed by the state medical board and legislation. It does have everything to do with standards of regional accreditation. It is not degree creep, it doesn't change what needs to be done. It is simply applying the standards of regional accreditation and academic aptitude. oh, and the degree is a doctor of medical science. Not PA Medicine. And the tuition cost is similar to all regional costs (extrapolated out to 2021); the program has no fees. And finally, I was a "certified PA." Please don't get caught up in the falsehood of degree creep or thinking the university makes more doing this. Neither are true. The cost is the same. In fact, it is easier for me to build a Master's degree. But, I am an academic and I intend to pursue a program that meets regional accreditation standards as listed above. Hope this helps. Greg
    16 points
  48. I'VE BEEN ACCEPTED INTO THE BARRY ST. PETE CAMPUS PA PROGRAM!!!!! You guys, this is my 3rd time applying to PA school. I have waited sooooo long for this day and worked sooooo hard. I literally started crying. Congrats to everyone else that has been accepted and for those who haven't, keep your head up and if this is what you really want, do NOT give up!!!
    16 points
  49. So I went to the open house last night and got a lot of info on the program, some of it surprising. I thought I would summarize things here in case it was helpful to other applicants this cycle. The number one priority at Pacific is GPA. Although their cut off is a 3.0, it was suggested not to apply without at least a 3.4. Of 2200 applications, only about 700 meet their soft GPA requirements and the rest they screen out. Both BCP GPA and last 45 semester credits are weighted equally, and more or less these two number should average to a 3.6 or above to be considered a competitive applicant. They will only read two LORs. It was stressed that they want to see letters from clinicians or supervisors in the medical field. If you have five letters, the two strongest medical letters will be selected and read as part of the application. Even if you have a strong academic letter and two weaker medical letters, they will toss the academic letter. Because they prefer high GPA applicants who are already obviously academically strong, at this point they just want to hear how those in the medical field view your abilities. Once your application is verified and sent over to Pacific, they will not look at updates. After verification your app is printed and it is not revisited. Any updates over the application cycle will not be viewed. Pacific doesn't use rolling admissions. They start offering interviews in September, about two weeks after the deadline. There is supposedly no benefit to early submission and all applicants verified by September 1st are considered for interviews. Interviews are offered on Saturdays in October, November and December. There will be four interview days this year. On each date about a quarter of the class is admitted. You will receive an acceptance email in about 3 - 5 days, usually the Tuesday or Wednesday following your interview day, if you were accepted and likely a phone call as well. Deposit is $1,000 and you have two weeks to accept or decline the offer. Those are the main things that stood out to me! If anyone has specific questions I would be happy to try to answer them. Good luck to everyone this cycle!
    16 points
  50. Many years ago when my wife and I were dating I got an email from a young man who was a medic under me when I was an Army PA. He thanked me for what I had taught him and what I did for him. I was stunned because when I look at those years mostly what I see is what I did wrong and could have done better. It touched me...humbled me..honestly made me shake my head. I shared the note with my future wife who said “you have cast a long shadow.” While I wasn’t sure (and still aren’t) that I deserved that approbation the expression stuck with me. My wife is so much smarter than me… Lately I have been reflecting on that expression and our profession. I am a regular on a couple of PA boards and every day I am amazed at the talent and energy and caring and compassion and intelligence of my colleagues most of whom I have never met. It can get lost in the doom and gloom if you don’t look for it. Then I think of the PAs I have known (and I won’t name them because they would only feel uncomfortable and shake THEIR heads). My military colleagues..well I don’t even need to explain that. Providing care for our military members and their families under some very difficult conditions. Two of my oldest friends who have each given years and years of time to advancing the profession and who are, literally, 2 of the smartest people I have known in my life. My friend who spent 20 years growing and improving a PA program that, no doubt, touched hundreds if not thousands of lives. One of my newer acquaintances who has always been way ahead of the times in his predictions and beliefs about the profession and has now begun to see things he predicted (and worked hard to facilitate) for 10 years come to fruition. Many friends who gave their time, sometimes a lot of time, to their state, specialty, or national organizations for no reason other than they wanted to do something to advance the profession. The friends who work in under-served areas taking care of folks nobody else wants to care for, in places few will go, usually earning much less than they could somewhere else. I can’t even count the number of colleagues I know who volunteered to teach PA students in their clinical rotations for no compensation. It really just goes on and on. These days it is pretty easy to get bogged down in all the things going “wrong” with our profession. I think if we each take a little time to regroup and reconsider we can find a lot of things right with our profession. If you aren’t sure...if you aren’t sure where to look...just look for the long shadows. They are all around.
    16 points
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