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Showing content with the highest reputation on 05/06/2021 in all areas

  1. Nice post I saw re: anti-vaxxers from Your Local Epidemiologist (Katelyn Jetelina) A few days ago, I shared a Texas Monthly news article on Facebook. The article features a prominent anti-vaxxer, Heather Simpson, who ended up getting the COVID19 vaccine (AND who is starting to vaccinate her daughter). It’s a fascinating read. Wellllll…guess who I had coffee with yesterday?! That’s right. Heather Simpson. I, of course, had a million questions. Way too many for one coffee. I don’t know much about this world and we need to if we want to change the landscape. For this meeting though, I was most interested in two things from her unique perspective: Describe the problem Brainstorm solutions Heather and I chatted away. Describe the problem From hearing her story, I realized that there is a spectrum of anti-vaxxers. There are the extreme, but there are many others less extreme. This may be obvious to some, but I certainly wasn’t aware of the specific groups, in which Heather gave creative names. Scared. These are closest to vaccine hesitant. These people are scared, but CAN be helped with facts. We just need to get them the facts. For example, when Heather was an anti-vaxxer she was most worried about the aluminum in vaccines. Once she understood the science, though, Heather could hold the facts close to her heart. When her daughter got her first vaccine last month, Heather kept repeating those facts in her head at the doctors office. She couldn’t find a way to talk herself out of the vaccine because she had scientific based facts. Even through tears. Ex-vaxxers. This is the next group down the spectrum. This is a group of parents in which something happened with their kids (autism, ADHD). And no one has answers for them. And, worse, their physician sometimes brushes off the problem. Heather explained to me the only thing that would help this group is to offer an answer focused on data. For example, conducting more scientific studies on autism or ADHD. We need to provide an answer OTHER than vaccines. 100% natural people. She ranked this group next, which seems to be deeply rooted in religion. Basically, this group thinks “you can play God” or “God did not make a mistake with your body and your immune system.” For example, you won’t get cancer because you eat healthy. Or, your kid got a urinary tract infection because you let them have McDonalds. This group doesn’t touch anything pharmaceutical. Interestingly, influencers in this group makes a lucrative living by selling natural supplements through pyramid schemes. Light conspiracy theorists. This group is next. They are the willfully ignorant. They watched YouTube videos and can’t be pulled out. This group starts dabbling in off the wall comments, like they’re spraying “chem-trails” in the air. (I had to look up “chem-trails”. “Chemtrails, short for chemical trails, are what some call the white trails you see left behind as a plane passes overhead. Believers in the chemical aspect of chemtrails say those trails are actually clouds of chemicals used by the government or some other large scale entity for a variety of nefarious purposes from weather modification, to human population control via sterilization, to even mind control”.) Lizard people. And then, finally, we have the extreme anti-vaxxer group. They are deep in the conspiracy world. We are talking QAnon, thinking Hillary Clinton is a lizard and drinks the blood of babies. Their whole world view is altered. Heather called them “lizard people”. How will the COVID19 vaccine change the anti-vaxx world? It seems like the COVID19 vaccine is causing people to jump from one group to another for other vaccines. For example, she described a family who was vaccine hesitant, but still got all childhood vaccines. However, because of COVID19, they have moved from “hesitant” to “scared” group because COVID19 vaccine was “rushed” and so that must mean all vaccines have faulty processes. And now they won’t get any other vaccines. So what can we, public health officials, do? I’m not going to pretend that I have found the solution on how to stop a international movement. But, there were some themes that I gathered from our conversation… Primary prevention: Prevent it before it ever occurs through education and scientific communication. There is a lot of work we can do here. For example, we can specifically reach people when a family comes to a healthcare providers’ office. Secondary prevention: Reduce the impact that has already occurred. For me, at least, it’s helpful to know that not all anti-vaxxers are a lost cause. There is a spectrum and each group needs to be targeted in a different way. Tertiary prevention: Soften the impact of anti-vaxxer movement that has lasting effects. We are never going to win the battle of misinformation, so we need to figure out a way to calm the fire. This HAS to be a conversation with social media giants (which I’m having with FB) and a conversation at dinner tables, and everything in between. So, all this to say, I agree with the Texas Monthly article: “The movement entraps people but also that it’s possible—if much harder—for minds to change.” Love, YLE
    2 points
  2. An update on the media stuff. Tucker Carlson is now using "data" from VAERS to claim that the current vaccine rollout is the deadliest in history. This irresponsible rhetoric is why so many are so adamantly opposed to vaccinations, if people were still wondering.
    2 points
  3. What is the volume.... What is the volume.... and.... What is the volume.... Those are the questions that anyone who works UC should be asking.
    2 points
  4. Hey everyone! My name is Brandon, and I work as an EMT-B here in NYC and will be applying this cycle. Best of luck to everyone
    2 points
  5. Hey y'all, I've been accepted to CUNY York!!!!! I am so so so excited to meet everyone.
    2 points
  6. So yesterday the LA HOD passed legislation to approve NP FPA in the great state or Louzziana. I watched and was honestly surprised that it passed. Now the bill is off to the LA Senate. LAPA played the game pretty smart in my humble opinion: they placed HB442 back on the calendar to be debated today 5/6/2021. Basically they let the NP bill get debated, questions answered (horribly by the State Reps authoring the bill) and passed prior to the final presentation of the PA modernization bill. In essence, what's good for the goose etc etc. Yesterday's session is available to view here: https://www.house.louisiana.gov/H_Video/VideoArchivePlayer?v=house/2021/may/0505_21_Day15_2021RS . The NP Bill (HB 495) debate starts at timestamp 2:49:50 . Very interesting to watch if you guys have some time. Back to the PA bill. Here's what is stands to accomplish: The full bill can be read here: https://www.legis.la.gov/legis/ViewDocument.aspx?d=1218613
    1 point
  7. Hey everyone, I graduate tomorrow and take the PANCE at the end of this month. Assuming I pass, I'll have 01 June - 31 December, 2021 free to spend back home in California. I start my residency Jan, 2022 in Houston. I'm going to spend the first month of my free-time enjoying life and focusing all my attention on my family. After that, I know I'm going to be itching to do something. I understand that due to my residency start date, finding any work will be difficult. I talked to a few preceptors and one preceptor mentioned to go get my DOT Certification and go work at an urgent care and do DOT physicals. Is this realistic with the short time I'll have (5 months)? Another provider mentioned COVID clinics. Is this also realistic? In addition to the two options mentioned above, are there any other "job" options for someone in my situation? I am open to anything. After taking the PANCE I'm sure I'll be super motivated to work and learn new things. I just want to do something and make some money while I wait for my residency to start. Any information will be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
    1 point
  8. Its not unreasonable but it isn't great. The PTO seems very low. My last UC started everyone with 240 hours off. As Cid pointed out patient volume is the single biggest issue. Last UC would not, even after years of discussions about patient safety and provider burnout, set any sort of limits on our 12 hour day. Let me promise you when you get to your 50th patient with 15 more in the lobby you are brain-dead dangerous. Do it multiple times and your safe number goes down further. It is bad for patients and puts you in professional jeopardy. My org would lose half the providers after every flu season and replace them and wouldn't change anything. If I had a pearl to share it would be this.... many people treat UC like some easy way to make extra money or something old PAs do to semi retire. In the middle of oceans of trivial crap that doesn't need any real care there are drops of critical problems. Not missing them is the magic sauce. In my last 3 years of UC I had 2 pneumothorax, multiple STEMIs and more non-STEMIs than I can count. There are also tons of people who come to the UC because they don't want to wait at the ER and have no idea what your capabilities are. I have had stabbings, gunshot wounds, dog maulings, big MVAs (with an anterior C3 fracture) etc etc. Don't be complacent and don't be shy about moving things on to the ER even if they give you grief. Your first responsibility is to the patient. Keep your index of suspicion turned up high. Forgot to add it isn't unusual to have to wait for health insurance to kick in but I have always been able to negotiate a start date within a few weeks of starting work. Good luck!
    1 point
  9. Isn't that super low PTO? You can only take 2 weeks off per year? That sounds like burnout waiting to happen. You'll never be able to take an "extended" vacation unless you take off no other days all year.
    1 point
  10. Granted I haven't really been paying too much attention to the news, I haven't really seen this. I know CNN regularly has Dr. Peter Hotez on whom I have much respect for. My major concern is social media where there is a fine line of choosing between "censoring" someone and preventing the spread of misinformation that could literally kill (see here: Disinformation Dozen). These people are pretty crafty and oftentimes employ the same tactics of cult leaders. It would be very difficult for anyone who is a part of news media to counteract these statements because of the distrust in the "MSM" that has already been sown by others. No matter how reasonable a message being put out by CNN, FOX, or whoever, the types of people who are fanatically opposed to these vaccines are highly unlikely to believe it as a reputable source anyway.
    1 point
  11. yes, very low. New grads are getting 55-65/hr for UC in the pacific NW. cme is low for full time. should be 2000+ how about professional dues: nccpa, state license, dea, acls, pals, cpr, etc? Those should all be covered.
    1 point
  12. Sage Advice for New Graduates Robert M. Blumm, PA-C Emeritus, DFAAPA Congratulations! Many of you will be graduating from your PA & NP programs in the coming months. You are about to set out on a clinical career journey that could be as long as forty years. A few years ago, my wife and I planned a trip to Italy where we would visit all of the sights of Rome and Florence. Twelve days in Europe was a gift to ourselves - for me after many years of practice and for her, a lifetime of teaching Humanities to high school students. Our journey started six months before when she, as my task master, gave me several books earmarked with all of the relevant sights we were to experience. This homework was an invaluable crash-course on the art, architecture, poetry and history of all of the places we were to visit. Had she not crafted our course of study, I would have been like a child awakening on Christmas morning to twenty gifts which I could not open, let alone understand. You have just completed an arduous course of study which has demanded a lot of sacrifice: study, financial cost, neglected friendships and delayed marriage plans. The initial goal was just to graduate; now you are required to take a certification examination to determine if all of your hard work was fruitful. When the large envelope arrives with your certification you are then ready to start. Correct? No! Now you will now need to make more decisions that determine your future. And these decisions are just as complex as your clinical training. Just like our trip to Italy, you will need to weigh many options and choices whose decisions will impact your success as a new PA or NP. My graduation present to you is this article which has the potential to better prepare you for your new journey as a professional clinician. It’s advice from me and my colleagues in business, administration and professional practice and will likely make your career journey safer and more satisfying. Like any advice, you can heed or disregard it – but hopefully, it will be a helpful component of your career blueprint for success. These suggestions come from a variety of sources such as well-known PAs, like EMEDPA, a senior moderator on PhysicianAssistantForum.com, many of your PA Colleagues, myself included, Personal Liability Experts such as those from the AAPA endorsed provider and years of observing the pains and rewards of those who have provided healthcare to our nation in their professional capacity. Ø Your first job is about learning your clinical skills, not about money. Ø If you can afford to do a residency in your field of choice, do it! see #1 above. Ø As a new grad you can have two of the following, three if you are lucky: location, specialty, salary. Choose wisely. Ø Read your contracts thoroughly before signing them. Look for hidden details, such as mention of a non-compete clause. [A non-compete clause is a legally binding contract whereby the employee agrees not to work with a rival company or start a similar trade or profession for a specified period of time after leaving his current employer.] Ø Choose a favorite maxim and then try to live by it. Mine remains: “Tis far better to show what you know than to say what you know”. Equally important: “Say, rather than show, what you don’t know.” Ø Join your professional organizations and support them so that you will be empowered to make changes that the first fifty years of PAs were unable to accomplish. Ø Don't take the first job you are offered unless it's ideal. Don't settle for mediocrity, ever. Ø Don't accept a position in a specialty that you detest just because “it’s a job”. You will be miserable in a job that you dislike and you will never achieve excellence. Ø Don’t accept a position that does not offer CME and vacation time that is adequate for you and your family. Do not accept call without pay, weekends without pay and no more than two weekends monthly. Ø Do not work in a critical care setting immediately out of school. Hospitalist, ICU, CCU, pediatrics are all specialties for experienced providers. Spend at least two years of non-critical care clinical work so that transitions to other specialties can be accomplished more effortlessly. Ø Don't work in a very narrow field right out of school unless it is your dream job and you never intend to leave the specialty. I know lots of folks stuck in jobs they hate who can't leave them. Ø If you are getting burned out, consider the following: work fewer hrs./mo., see fewer pts/shift, switch specialty, switch location. Find something new where you are appreciated. Ø An essential lesson that I learned which I discovered after working too hard for others. Your husband/wife/significant other and children should be your first priority, yourself your second, your practice third, and professional politics last. No one will ever care for you like your family. Jobs expire, positions fail to exist beyond their time limits and then you will be forgotten. You can never recoup the time you have lost working for others. I have served this profession as a leader for about thirty years. But I paid a price: my kids placed a photo of me at the dinner table at a certain time in our life. Sad commentary. Ø Don't take a job where your clinical supervisor is an RN or office manager. We are not medical assistants. Ø Don't refer to yourself as Dr Smith's PA. They don't own you. Say instead, “I'm John Doe, one of the PAs here." Or "I'm John Doe, I work with Dr Smith on the surgical service.” Words matter. Don't let yourself be treated like an assistant. Don't regularly take out trash, take your own vitals, room patients, etc. unless the docs in the group do so, too. I can see this in a small office, but there is no excuse for it elsewhere. Well, we have covered many of the rules and suggestions but now let me conclude and write about the most important task on your new medical journey. Remember my trip to Italy which I spoke about earlier? Your excitement as you begin your career is comparable to the thrill and anticipation one feels as they set off to explore the Renaissance. But unforeseen events can destroy that cherished vacation: robbery, an injury to you, a crisis at home. So, as your journey begins, a critically important item to secure is a professional liability insurance policy, better known as a malpractice policy, and it is never more affordable than when you first graduate. The AAPA, your professional organization, has endorsed an excellent provider and secured special rates for you, the new PA. Every PA should carry personal liability insurance for all time periods during which they have practiced. A malpractice suit can be brought against you at any time after seeing a patient (days, weeks, months or even years). And a malpractice suit can jeopardize your professional reputation and impact your credentials with the potential of losing your license by suspension or revocation. Your malpractice history is a matter of public record and your NPI number creates a profile of your lifetime practice. Your ability to secure employment will be decided partly upon this information. New graduates have a one-time opportunity for securing discounted insurance premiums for five years which offers comprehensive protection. Congratulations on your graduation and best of luck!
    1 point
  13. 1 point
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