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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/06/2017 in all areas

  1. I just want to encourage those of you who have a low GPA and want to become a PA. Here’s a little bit about me. I applied twice to PA school. The first time I applied, I applied to 12 schools and didn’t get an interview invite from any of them. My cGPA during the first cycle was around d 2.88 and my sGPA was around a 3.2. I had rough start to my college career. My GRE scores were horrible- less than 140 on both the quantitative and qualitative. After my rejection, I retook the GRE. I ended up getting 151 on the qualitative, 147 on the quantitative, and 3.0 writing. I retook two of my prerequis
    5 points
  2. I've found quite a few, especially the new NP grads who realize they don't know how to read an EKG, etc.
    4 points
  3. Speaking as someone who's dad is a plumber: yeah it's worth it. Don't be fooled into thinking that all plumbers are going around making 200k just for doing easy repairs. It takes a different kind of person to be happy working in manual labor, and I'd be willing to bet that kind of person isn't someone who frequents this forum. I thought I would like it, one summer working with my dad in highschool proved me wrong. Unless you're ok with getting called to wade knee deep in someone else's crap for a couple hours, only to have them yell at you and say that somehow it's your fault and you
    4 points
  4. In a word, no. I have a friend who is a commercial plumber. He brings home probably $250k. Has 3 employees. I wouldn't say he loves his job, but he gets home at 5 o clock every day and can vacation when he wants, runs his own roost. No student debt. I honestly look at myself as a skilled laborer of sorts. I have an education, a set of skills, and a license. I deal with the public, performing a service. What separates me from trade labor is the amount of sacrifice involved. I have massive student debt, much greater responsibility/liability, high-stakes licensing exams, and relen
    4 points
  5. For me the short answer is yes..it is worth it. Becoming a PA changed my Army career and then my whole life. It opened up opportunities and let me earn a comfortable living and provide for my family.Do some days suck? Yup... Are there days when I have visions of violence in my head while patients are acting foolish? Yup... But I decided a long time ago there are way worse things in the world and the perfect, happy-to-go-to-work-every-day job is the unicorn of employment. I know so many people who hate what they do. I know people who work hard and long hours and barely get by. I know people liv
    3 points
  6. Still in progress, but worth posting for the non traditional student, parents, or major career changers. Was pre med in college (2004-2008) and getting burnt out on school mid junior year. Senior year, husband deployed to Iraq and younger brother passed away suddenly in a car accident. Spent months in grief counseling, dropped all plans of further education, finished my bachelors degree, and took a job at an aerospace company. Wow, corporate work is kind of boring. It isn't for me. Transitioned from an R&D position to a program support job. Better, but really not what I wanted
    3 points
  7. Couldn't agree more! I was accepted to multiple PA schools the first time I applied with a GPA of 3.15. Anyone who says it can't be done is lying to you. Grades are important but they aren't everything.
    3 points
  8. ExamMaster, PAEasy, the CD that comes with the Davis review book all let you select a specific area. I used them quite a lot for reviews during didactic.
    2 points
  9. Got an interview invite yesterday for this program! Super excited! I interview on July 26th!
    2 points
  10. I always tell students I precept what specifically I find so stressful and unpleasant about medicine, but also that I'm only 1 guy and there are PAs out there who love their work. I think like any type of work, it has to do with both personality fit and the intrinsic qualities of the job---things like autonomy, creativity, and impact/recognition. Many people look at our work and think "wow, they really have it made". A lot of it is relative. If I was swinging a hammer all day on a roof in the hot sun, I'd think this looks like a sweet gig too. But when you're getting killed by demanding p
    2 points
  11. Just try to think of the events you have experienced that have shaped you into the person you are today. Pick one event or experience so that you remain focused throughout the piece. It could be work, travel, sports- anything! As long as you took something from the experience I believe you could write a compelling story on it best of luck!
    2 points
  12. This thread is brutal. Makes me wonder if I should have just stayed working in the Lab. It seems like every other provider has some sort of break. MD/DOs have massive social respect and recognition, and absolute autonomy. NPs have their independence, and relatively low student debt. PAs seem to get the brunt of everything. Hardly any social respect ("O' cool, you're an assistant, so you take my B/P and weight?"), Increasing student debt, no backup career (NPs have their RN), no independence, etc. Its rough. Hopefully some of this can change.
    2 points
  13. Heimlich/CPR not withstanding... I would never offer unsolicited medical advice to a complete stranger. There health issues are none of my business and I wouldn't want it to be. I don't want dentists telling me I need to floss more often, or stock traders telling me I need to invest, or insurance agents telling me I need to buy life insurance. For all you know that guy has had a full workup and is being treated for XYZ. A close family member or friend with a suspicious lesion? Child of a friend with whooping cough? Sure. Complete stranger? Nope.
    2 points
  14. Undergrad Ed School: Mansfield University of Pennsylvania (B.S. Nutrition: Dietetics, minor in biology) Age at application time: 22 Cumulative GPA: 3.60 Science GPA: 3.68 GRE: V 153(60%) Q 159(73%) A 4.5 (82%) Shadow Hours: ~40 hours in primary care LOR: 1 PA, 1 supervisor, 1 professor I also had a committee LOR from my school which included the dean of students, head of my department, my academic advisor, my premed adviser, my research adviser, and my biochemistry professor. Direct Patient Care: ~40 hours in autistic behavioral health, but this was no
    2 points
  15. Just back from Iraq. 34 hrs in transit. DogLovingPA was also on my team. we had 2 docs, 2 PAs, 1 NP, 3 RNs, and 1 paramedic. very intense experience. more serious trauma in 2 weeks than in my 30 year career as an EMPA, including during a 5 week trauma surgery rotation as a student. multiple GSWs and serious burns almost every day. We were 1-2km from the front lines and could hear almost constant gunfire, rockets, mortars, etc. We were colocated with an Iraqi special forces unit. we divided into 3 teams and rotated major cases 24/7 with everyone picking up the minor stuff as it came in. We had
    2 points
  16. Just received the call to interview on August 15th!!
    2 points
  17. Undergrad Ed School: University of South Florida CASPA Cumulative Undergrad GPA: 2.9 CASPA Science Undergrad GPA: 2.7 Graduate Ed School: University of South Florida Masters in Public Health, Global Communicable Diseases Program CAPSA Cumulative Graduate GPA: 3.91 CASPA Science Graduate GPA: 3.91 CASPA Post Bach GPA: 4.0 (27 credits total retaken) CASPA Post Bach Science GPA: 4.0 CASPA Overall Cumulative Undergrad GPA: 3.01 CASPA Overall Science Undergrad GPA: 3.0 Age at application time: 29 1st GRE: 570Q 480V 3.0W 2nd GRE: 148Q 152V 3.0W Direct Patient Care: Me
    2 points
  18. Before the Interview This article contains information on six important steps every applicant should consider before the PA school interview: 1. General Preparation 2. Types of Interviews 3. Do’s and Don’ts for the PA School Interview 4. Dealing with Anxiety 5. Silencing the “Inner Critic” 6. Final Preparation GENERAL PREPARATION You’ve done all the work necessary to get your CASPA application completed, and submitted. You wait in anticipation to hear back from the PA programs you applied to, and
    1 point
  19. I always do the Lang Q&A physician assistant examination questions for my clinical medicine exams. There are usually a good amount of questions with good explanations but I always wish I had more questions to quiz myself on before exams. I'm still in my didactic year and have also found myself wanting more question banks broken into specific subjects since I'm not specifically doing PANCE review stuff quite yet.
    1 point
  20. I use ROSH review (highly recommend) and PANCE master and they can both be broken down by subject Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    1 point
  21. 1 point
  22. Those that are quoting plumber salaries at over $100k, that is not the norm. As was said above, plumbers that make large salaries almost exclusively walk into a family business that is already established. Lawsuits in manual labor - ALL THE TIME!! No, they usually aren't multimillion dollar lawsuits, but they still occur. As for whether being a PA is worth it - it all depends on your perspective and goals in life. If you want to make maximum money while working the least hours, then you picked the wrong profession. I've only been out of school since December, but so far have loved my
    1 point
  23. Yes. I mailed mine in with my check to pay for it. I believe I found the link either in CASPA or on their website. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    1 point
  24. I also haven't heard anything since the confirmation email, which is a bummer because I thought I was competitive enough to at least receive a secondary! Looking at past years it looks like some applicants didn't receive secondaries until August. Maybe there's hope?
    1 point
  25. abp_520 No, unfortunately I didn't receive one, I just got a straight rejection. I emailed them back to see if I could get some feed back and see where my deficiency is. Thank you very much, and good luck to you!
    1 point
  26. I'm sorry to hear that. It just means you were meant to go to a school that's a better fit for you! Don't lose hope. Did you submit a supplemental? If so, may I ask when?
    1 point
  27. Other than an email saying they got my supplemental on may 31st, nope Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    1 point
  28. Thanks for the suggestions ... Although I am considering to take a phlebotomy course and I am revamping my resume' *fingers crossed*
    1 point
  29. Yay! Congratulations and I can't wait to meet you. My name is Monica. Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk
    1 point
  30. Well, you're coming in at kind of a weird time. EmCare just merged with Sheridan Health. We aren't really sure what is going to change but things almost certainly will. With EmCare, in my experience pay is very competitive but benefits are a little lacking. No 401k match or anything like that. We also don't have paid vacation. Hourly rate is high enough that none of that really bothers me. Sheridan really seems to like RVU based models, and there has been talk we may move that direction. Who knows... I'm in the Atlanta area, btw. What city are you near?
    1 point
  31. OP might be referring to Oceana University of Medicine in Samoa (https://oum.edu.ws/curriculum-overview-usa/) which has been discussed before in past threads. I wouldn't call it a bridge though because it's still a 4-5 year program but the curriculum is online so it's feasible to work full-time while in it. As far as likelihood of getting into a US-based residency after the program it's probably unlikely but this former CRNA seem to have done it successfully: https://www.zocdoc.com/doctor/young-genau-md-167583.
    1 point
  32. Larger population base with wide diversity of income levels and many of the "worker bees" are in the pipeline for retirement so someone will have to pick up their costs. The only national healthcare that I can see for all is government provided catastrophic care. Before we can do this we need to come to grips with the fact that humans don't live forever. Death with dignity (not talking about medical assisted suicides).
    1 point
  33. We seem to be one of the few "first world" countries that hasn't figured out a way yet. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    1 point
  34. Missed this one in the Bill of Rights. As I've stated before, medical care is also a privilege at present. Now, should it be a right? Tell me how to realistically provide it.
    1 point
  35. Depending on how many students interview on that day will depend on how many staff conduct your interview. My first year I was interviewed by two staff at once and my second year just one. The interview was very laid back and really just felt like a conversation. The questions were different from year to year but they did ask about my weaknesses, how I handle stress, and they WILL point out any weaknesses in your application. My big one was that I got a C in organic chem, we talked about that for a solid 5 min. They did not mention my essay. My best advice is to make sure you are prepared to e
    1 point
  36. Looks like there is a supplemental on there by the system is down until July 17th.
    1 point
  37. Recommend you set firm boundaries with your schedulers, especially the one at your PT job. To the PT scheduler: "I will work when my schedule and your schedule line up. That's it." To the FT scheduler: "I need my schedule to be set, in firm clay, by the Xth of every month so I can fulfill my commitments at other job." BTW - you NEED time off. I work locums/PRN at several places and I could easily work every day of every month.
    1 point
  38. Interviewing on the 13th! Does anyone have any advice or information they would like to share regarding their interview experience? Anything appreciated. Good luck, everyone!
    1 point
  39. Good Morning Everyone! I wanted to see if anyone else was being interviewed on July 13th, at 1:00pm? I'd like to say hello there! I feel like this thread is such a great support network. This was my timeline so far: CASPA Verified: May 19th South University Application Received: May 24th Call for Interview: June 9th Looking forward to meeting everybody, and interviewing with South University
    1 point
  40. Hello I am new to this forum, I have been reading several posts here, general topics RE: PA but I did not seem to find the answers I am looking for. I am an IMG, worked 9 years now as a medical assistant or nurse (doing nurse job) in one of the medical centers in the local community, here in the US. I could not finish my USMLEs as I worked part time too (time and financial constraints) so now I am considering to get into the PA program. This questions may seem overly simple but i would really appreciate some guidance. I have talked to some of the local school's academic adviser in m
    1 point
  41. I've heard this from others that have applied as well. One was even told to look for another career, and that same applicant is now only 6 months away from graduating as a PA. *shrugs*
    1 point
  42. Received an interview invite today as well! Scheduled for July 14th
    1 point
  43. Allow me to introduce myself as another Class of 2018 student. I will admit that the program is not perfect, but the current administration is working tirelessly to repair the damage that has been done. Part of the damage was unquestionably related to the former program director's blatant inability to take criticism and accept that maybe his way was not always the best way. We are blessed to have a new director who has OUR best interests at heart rather than her own ego. But the current PANCE pass rate has much less to do with the former leadership and much more to do with the che
    1 point
  44. Your GPA is great! Have you done any volunteering? You don't need to volunteer doing something medical - I walked dogs at a shelter! They want to see you give back to the community. Scribing is a great way to gain experience and you can absolutely get in with close to the minimum (1000) at your GPA, but you should shoot for more than that. A year full-time will put you about 2000, so if you apply 2018, you can probably get away with that! My stats were very similar to yours, 3.76 GPA, 1040 PCE as a CNA in subacute rehab. I also had ~80 hours shadowing, ~300 hours volunteering. GRE 315 comb
    1 point
  45. Undergrad Ed School: mid-sized public college (BA in International Relations) Cumulative Undergrad. GPA: 3.57 Science Undergrad. GPA: 3.74 (Pretty sure this was heavily influenced by several classes I took in the two years before and during which I was applying to PA school. These were undergraduate-level courses, but I took them long after college.) Graduate Ed School: (if applicable) large private research university (MS in Nutrition) Cumulative Graduate GPA: (if applicable) 3.10 Science Graduate GPA: (if applicable) 3.07 Age at application time : 30-31 1st GRE: Verbal 160, Quantitative 1
    1 point
  46. Complete honesty here - ANY PROVIDER SEEING 70 PATIENTS A DAY IS FULL OF CARP OR A COMPLETE HACK AND FRAUD. This sounds like a Medicare mill and the expectation that a new grad hits full pace on day one is BS. This sounds dangerous and just bad medicine. RUN
    1 point
  47. Ummm, 30 patients a day in an Internal Medicine practice is INSANE - experience or none. The salary is high but it sounds like you pay self taxes. I am not keen on the self incorporating thing. The CME is too low and the malpractice needs to be clarified to exactly MATCH what the doc has AND have tail coverage. Accept nothing less. Depending on the area you live in - 90 days is HUGE to quit. It is about 45 days too long and painful under any circumstances. Vacation is too restrictive on when, how much, etc. If you get PTO - you get to use it whether to go to Hawaii or get you
    1 point
  48. I find variety helps. I have 3 jobs: urban trauma ctr rural community hospital double coverage with doc seeing everything rural critical access hospital solo coverage. I also do medical missions and disaster medicine, switch things up a bit so you don't get into a rut. I'm also completing an additional degree ( DHSc global health) to keep sharp and learn new things. soon will start doing some part time teaching at a local PA program when done. go where you are appreciated and have a great scope of practice. don't worry about money, focus on autonomy and respect and the money will come.
    1 point
  49. agree with Rocketpropelled. When I graduated PA school I had a decent amount of debt and wanted to pay it off. After paying it off (except for the things like mortgage, etc) I was still working 200+ hrs/mo even though I didn't really need to. working a lot of hours becomes self-perpetuating. you've always done it so you always do it. people know they can count on you to cover shifts at short notice, etc. Over the last year or 2 I've gotten better at cutting down my hours. school forced some of that, and it was a positive change. my wife has already told me not to pick up more shifts when don
    1 point
  50. I would consider correctional medicine working directly for the DOC - don't go with agency. I did agency with the DOC and made about 45$ an hour though if I worked directly with them I would have made double. A girlfriend of mine in San Antonio TX also just told me last week about a position offered to her paying 200k (I'm not kidding - I saw the physical email) working with women and children who have escaped over the Mexican border. The hours were Monday-Friday from 3-11 pm. I don't know yet weather she will explore the opportunity or not. Honestly the highest paying are the least desirable
    1 point
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