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I'll critique your personal statement and supplemental essays


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#1 GoyaHoya69

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Posted 12 October 2016 - 03:20 AM

Just recently got accepted into one of my top choice PA programs and feel like giving back to this forum. I got 9 interviews at some pretty good schools and am still expecting 1 or 2 more. I think my essays (along with interviewing skills) were a strength of mine, so I'd like to help those still in the application/interview process.

Post your personal statement or supplemental essays here and I'll read/critique them. It might take me a few days to reply, but I will do it. I'm also happy to post my own personal statement if anyone actually wants to see it. Good luck!


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#2 Kline208

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Posted 13 October 2016 - 09:54 PM

Hello I'd love you to critique my essay! Would it be more beneficial to post them here or dm you?



#3 GoyaHoya69

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Posted 14 October 2016 - 02:34 AM

Hello I'd love you to critique my essay! Would it be more beneficial to post them here or dm you?


Either one, doesn't matter to me.


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#4 enknight1

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Posted 20 October 2016 - 04:46 PM

So inspired to read your essay! Also, where all were you invited to for interviews? Congrats to you! 



#5 bradford.clark

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Posted 17 November 2016 - 04:23 PM

Hi there, if you dont mind would you mind giving this a glance? I feel that it is good writing but not sure how to take it to the next level.

 

“I got you man, hang tight! They’re just around the corner,” I lied. The moped lay several meters from the pair of us while a friend called 911. I had basic First-Aid knowledge so my first thought was to “stabilize the head” but The Red Cross training did not prepare me for this. The blood sank between my fingers, carrying bits of solid brain matter that stuck to the hair on the back of my hand. His body convulsed with random hand jerks and his crossed-eyes looked through mine. My face was solid. I knew I would be the last person this old man will ever see; I couldn’t show him the terror that I felt. As he drifted away in my hands the ambulance arrived. One got out and told me “It’s okay man, you did everything you could’ve done.” In my head I thought, “Did I?”

 

As a young adult midway through my college career, I felt the angst of not knowing my destiny commonly shared amongst my peers. Having someone die in my hands put my life into perspective as this was my first connection with a patient, and something told me it would not be my last.

 

PA shadowing in the Emergency Room opened a new door for me. As rapid as the physicians, my PA met patient after patient; suturing ripped stitches, directing nurses and attendees through an acute cardiac arrest, resetting ulnar fractures and making their own diagnoses, all at the hands of a PA.

 

When formulating a detailed plan with their doctor, the PA shows confidence in their ability to understand their patients to make sure the treatment plan is in their best interests. While speaking to the patients and their families the PA never spoke down to them, rather they talked slowly and provided their professional opinion with certainty.

 

Given the differential between the number of years one trains to become a doctor versus training as a PA, I was initially worried that fewer years of training might make me feel less confident in my decision-making. In other words, my concern was feeling I would not have enough medical knowledge.  And to some extent that may be true, but having spent a considerable amount of time working in an emergency room setting, I can now see that the PA is adaptable and collected in every case. One minute the PA was resetting an infant’s shoulder back into place with little time in between from incising a perianal cyst.

 

I began working as a Medical Scribe in the Emergency Room. Not only did working alongside a physician day and night broaden my medical knowledge, I was first-hand witness to the extent the physician depends on the PA. They may see different patients, sometimes the same ones, but there is trust instilled on the PA from the physician to work independently but through team practice.

 

Teaching and learning has always had a place in my heart. Experience as a summer camp Director and substitute teacher showed the parallels it has to being a PA. It’s their responsibility to teach their patients about healthy practice and treatment plans while speaking to the level of the patient. 

 

“We are a leader amongst leaders,” one PA told me. Throughout my education I could have been consumed by college’s temptations, but my mind was focused. I could have been a follower, but I was different. Empowered with compassion to help others the Army ROTC program taught me to solve problems, certifying as an EMT taught me to trust my skills, and shadowing PAs on weekends taught me teamwork and compassion. Striving to set myself apart from others required a lot of self-confidence, and as a PA I’m going to need it the next time somebody tells me, “It’s okay, you did everything you could’ve done.” I’ll be able to say, “I did.”



#6 pa.jflores

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Posted 28 November 2016 - 10:41 PM

Hi,

 

I really appreciate what youre doing. Hopefully you'll have the time to read mine. I already submitted it, but I just wanted to hear from a third party since one of the schools I applied to didnt even look at my personal statement because I didnt fulfill one of their requisites. Im still waiting on three other schools.

 

“This is a 35 year old male who just got hit by a bus!” It was my second day as a volunteer uncertain of the halls and blind to what I got myself into. Unease with each step, a bell rang three times. Immediately five nurses rushed to the nearest gurney by the paramedic bay. The Emergency Medical Technician pushed the crash cart by the headrest. Sliding doors opened. Two paramedics rush in with a man screaming agony as they gave report to the surrounding staff. The calm Doctor asked, “Which side?” “The Right!” Scanning for any obvious deformities, contusions or lacerations. The man screamed with all his might, “I CANT BREATHE!” Stethoscope handed by the nurse immediately, diagnosis observed, a collapsed lung, right side. The Emergency Medical Technician crew was on the chest tube. He would make it. Orchestration in hospitalization. 

As a curious student, I have made it a habit and a goal to ask questions. “What the heck just happened”? That was a common one at the hospital. I befriended a physician assistant who answered all my questions. Like the one time, I had to be at the hospital for a 6AM aortic valve replacement. Imagine the surreal feeling of seeing a person lying flat on their back. Sedated, waiting for the saw to open their chest. The physician’s assistant was already harvesting the vein in the patients forearm. Once the Doctor opened the chest, the physician took over. As part of the team I saw the life of a beating heart. I knew at that moment, this was my calling. I want to make a difference in my community. Centinela Hospital, Cedar Sine, and working as an Emergency Medical Technician are my unfair advantages. I grew through a process of self-actualization while serving the community. To become a physician's assistant is another stone harvested along the way. 

Having a Phlebotomy Certification, hands on Emergency Medical Technician experience and a few years of work. I am fortunate to work as an ER Tech for Centinela Hospital in Inglewood, California. A work ethic from immigrant parents, I have mastered the skills necessary to do all the basic tasks expected of me. While going above and beyond taking blood and vitals, I can perform CPR. I can identify “crashing”, splinting and I enjoy building relationships with those that I serve. Miss Nava Marissa was one such patient. I met her the first night she checked in. And was with her on her last. Nava Marissa had ETOH, physical, psychological and emotional turbulences.  I understood she wanted love and I gave it to her unconditionally as best a practitioner could. She was homeless, a drug addict, and had a traumatic past. I learned compassion every night at her bedside.

I want the opportunity to make a difference. I promise to go above and beyond myself. Selfless help to those less fortunate and needing love. Having invested my studies to help people in need. I am eager to advance my study to return more prepared and better equipped to serve my community. Growing everyday, invigorated by being alive. The medical field rewards the selfless actions. Gifting someone the ability to live longer on this earth. Stressful and painful on the mind and spirit at times, I have handled this gift by turning stress to eustress. While grinding, I focus on preparing myself to be the greatest physician’s assistant I can be.

Working on the Rig as an Emergency Medical Technician, a handyman for a Real Estate ER, going to school, volunteering and trying to sleep at the same time. I have to keep myself dedicated to working hard and leading my life in the direction I want. I am a chameleon to my environment. I learned how to survive in a sink or swim environment at Centinela Hospital. With little to no training I had to learn how to be useful for my staff and serving over 2.5 million people. In a five-mile radius every single day I call mine. Now, I am ready to step up and take on more responsibility. I need the tools and education only you can provide for me. I offer my commitment and my bilingual aptitude to learning to be the best. I am already a senior leader, having earned my stripes in the field. Now I need the schooling to validate my worth. 



#7 jsh2260

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Posted 04 February 2017 - 03:55 PM

Thank you so much for offering to look at essays! One of my issues with mine is it is over the character count and I need help cutting it down, but at the same time I feel like I still have so much to say. 

 

"Living in the Alaskan bush is for the adventurous at heart. Practicing medicine there takes immense diligence and courage. Meet my dad, a family physician newly graduated from residency when he was stationed at Kanakanak Hospital, a 16-bed facility in Dillingham, 330 miles across the Alaska Range from Anchorage. I grew up listening in awe to his remarkable stories about the Yup’ik Eskimos, the fascinating cases he oversaw and the occasional difficult decisions he had to make. My father was not the only person who ignited my passion for a job in the medical field. My grandmothers on both sides were registered nurses and my great-uncle was a family doctor in rural Tennessee. With so many medical professionals in my family, medical cases ended up being normal dinner conversation to my mother’s dismay. However, while my mother cut the stories short by shrieking: “No talking about blood at the table!” I listened intently and always took mental notes of the little snippets I did hear.

A strong memory I have from my childhood is of me digging through an anesthesiologist’s bag of lip balms and picking a flavor to be smeared in my gas mask in the pediatric orthopaedic unit at Johns Hopkins Hospital. It did not take long for me to find the perfect flavor: bubblegum. I remember being asked to count down from 100 after being exposed to the anesthetic. 8-year old me was quite concerned because 100 is a very big number and it would take a long time to count all the way down to zero. As you can probably tell, surgeries were a big part of my childhood. I was born with bilateral clubbed feet and was in and out of the hospital for multiple corrective surgeries on my feet and femurs throughout infancy and as a young girl over a period of ten years. I admired my pediatric orthopaedist and his team very much; not only for their skills but also for the way they always made me feel comfortable and secure. Every person who took care of me was so compassionate and exceptional at explaining to me what was happening so that I would not be afraid. I was incredibly fascinated by the work they did, asked a lot of questions, and even got a souvenir: the titanium plates and screws that were removed from my femurs. I know that without their immense dedication, both emotionally and medically, I would not be able to walk and run like everyone else. There is no way I can thank them enough for the wonderful life I have now. These experiences helped me understand what hospitalized patients go through, especially those preparing to go into major surgery. It is my dream to pass on the kindness and love that was showered upon me in the hospital as a child to other people in need.

My undergraduate degree is in biological sciences, but when it came time to think about a career I found myself drawn to clinical medicine. I volunteered at a free medical clinic and I am presently volunteering on a hotline for victims of domestic violence and sexual abuse. I shadowed several physicians and physician assistants in family practice, anesthesiology, and orthopaedics in order to discover more about being on the other side of the exam table. While shadowing, I became aware of my affinity to the physician assistant profession. All the PAs I had worked with were able to become close with their patients and they were enthusiastic about coming to work every day. In addition, their relationship with the physicians was durable and dependable and together they make a great team. Being able to change specialties without having to go back to school is also a wonderful advantage PAs have over nurse practitioners and physicians. There are many areas of medicine that appeal to me (family practice, trauma, orthopaedics, and sports medicine, to name a few) so having the flexibility to change specialties and try new things is of particular interest to me.

Currently, I am an ophthalmic technician in the float pool at the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins. Being a valuable part of the nation’s largest ophthalmic clinical and research enterprise has given me numerous opportunities to learn from world-renowned doctors about rare and difficult cases and care for patients from all over the globe. Working in the float pool requires great flexibility and knowledge; it’s imperative to know how each clinic operates and to remember what preferences specific doctors have concerning patient work-ups. This job has exposed me to nearly every ophthalmic subspecialty and I have gained crucial skills in taking accurate patient histories and administering an array of different diagnostic tests. I have received glowing reviews from patients and doctors in regards to how respectful and positive I am and how well I explain diagnostic procedures. It is so important to make sure patients know they are being heard and that they understand why we perform certain tests and what the process will be like. I will continue to do this as a future PA.

After completing PA school, I plan to work in a medically underserved area. Practicing in a rural area would immerse me in the fabric of the community and I would be able to know my patients and their families better. Having grown up in a small Virginia town, I love the small-town vibe where everyone looks out for each other when they are in need. I understand that being a PA in a rural area comes with a higher level of autonomy, but this draws me closer to the opportunity. I enjoy challenges, and have a lot of initiative and self-reliance.  I was the first exchange student from Virginia Tech to go to Finland: I spent that academic year navigating a very different culture and academic system. During the summer of 2015, I also worked at a biological research station in a remote area of Arizona.

I am certain that rural work would give me unique experiences in the medical field, and my role as a PA would be more significant in a remote area than in a larger city. Enraptured by my dad’s cases in the Alaskan bush, my experiences living in Finland and traveling to remote areas of northern Europe, and my living at a field station two hours from the nearest grocery store, I firmly believe that being a PA in a rural setting is the career for me."



#8 wesli20

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Posted 18 February 2017 - 04:15 AM

Love that you are giving back! I am not a normal pre pa. I have shadowing hours and volunteer hours, but zero paid hce. I have a family and can't take the pay cut to become a cna or similar. Therefore I'm only applying to schools that don't require hours, which makes my letter different.
Let me know what you think! Thanks!

With the cliché “I want to help people” words in my mouth, and dollar signs in my eyes at 18 years old I started toward my career goal to become a doctor. During my first spring break, my brother and I were the only witnesses to a motorcycle accident. No helmet, he crashed through a fence and was unconscious and bleeding from his ears when we found him. Minutes later, standing covered in a stranger’s blood, we watched the life flight in no hurry to take off, confirming in our minds that the man had most likely died before our eyes as he was struggling to breathe.
I changed my major.
At that young age, I had not considered the hard parts of the medical profession. The long days and nights, the delivery of bad news, and death. I had only thought of the money. For the next ten years I searched for my passion. The perfect job with lots of money, but lacking all the unpleasant hard parts. The kind of jobs that high school advisors talk about. The job where I would wake up and go to work even if I wasn’t getting paid.
Some of the worst advice is given with the best intentions. Life isn’t about avoiding hard things; it is about growing until you can do hard things, and even enjoy hard things.
The reason I believe a college GPA is a good estimate of how well that person will do in the workforce is because it shows whether that person is willing to give it their all and excel even in the classes they aren't passionate about. They don't give up when it gets hard. They don't blame the professor. They don’t let anything stand in the way of who they want to become.
I am not becoming a physician assistant because I enjoy seeing motorcycle injuries, but through applying myself in school, I will be the best of the best at saving the lives that can be saved.
As the father of three, I will never enjoy seeing the tears on the face of a child with a broken arm, but I will be the best at making them comfortable and unafraid.
Anyone who applies themselves in school can learn how to diagnose and treat disease. Not everyone will take the time to treat not just the disease, but also the person. As a physician assistant I will be able to focus on each patient as an individual, learn who they are, alleviate their fears and tension, and take time to help them understand exactly what is happening and why. Individuals are scared of the unknown. By providing them with understanding of the situation, fear will automatically dissipate.
As a physician assistant, my deepest goal will be to be remembered. I will be remembered by all of the team members I work with not only as a reliable teammate, but also as an emotional buoy to those around me. I will be remembered by professors and classmates at my various schools as the student who will go on to become the best in my field. And most importantly, I will be remembered by my patients not simply because I alleviated their illness, but because of how I made them feel while helping them.

Thanks for your time!

#9 Teacher2PAC

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Posted 19 February 2017 - 12:14 AM

What makes you stand out wesli20? Write about that in your statement and how shadowing may have influenced your decision to become a PA.



#10 johnvu

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Posted 20 February 2017 - 07:13 AM

Dear GoyaHoya69
 
My name is Duc. I will apply for PA this April. I am struggling how to write a personal statement. I need your help. I love seeing your personal statement. If you don't mind to share your personal statement, I love to see and learn it. I do appreciate to your kindness.
 
Sincerely,
Duc


#11 johnvu

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Posted 20 February 2017 - 07:22 AM

Dear everyone

 

Does anyone have good personal statements and like to share, I  love reading your statement. I do appreciate to your kindness!

 

Thanks



#12 runforhotdogs

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Posted 23 February 2017 - 07:51 PM

Love that you are giving back! I am not a normal pre pa. I have shadowing hours and volunteer hours, but zero paid hce. I have a family and can't take the pay cut to become a cna or similar. Therefore I'm only applying to schools that don't require hours, which makes my letter different.
Let me know what you think! Thanks!

With the cliché “I want to help people” words in my mouth, and dollar signs in my eyes at 18 years old I started toward my career goal to become a doctor. During my first spring break, my brother and I were the only witnesses to a motorcycle accident. No helmet, he crashed through a fence and was unconscious and bleeding from his ears when we found him. Minutes later, standing covered in a stranger’s blood, we watched the life flight in no hurry to take off, confirming in our minds that the man had most likely died before our eyes as he was struggling to breathe.
I changed my major.
At that young age, I had not considered the hard parts of the medical profession. The long days and nights, the delivery of bad news, and death. I had only thought of the money. For the next ten years I searched for my passion. The perfect job with lots of money, but lacking all the unpleasant hard parts. The kind of jobs that high school advisors talk about. The job where I would wake up and go to work even if I wasn’t getting paid.
Some of the worst advice is given with the best intentions. Life isn’t about avoiding hard things; it is about growing until you can do hard things, and even enjoy hard things.
The reason I believe a college GPA is a good estimate of how well that person will do in the workforce is because it shows whether that person is willing to give it their all and excel even in the classes they aren't passionate about. They don't give up when it gets hard. They don't blame the professor. They don’t let anything stand in the way of who they want to become.
I am not becoming a physician assistant because I enjoy seeing motorcycle injuries, but through applying myself in school, I will be the best of the best at saving the lives that can be saved.
As the father of three, I will never enjoy seeing the tears on the face of a child with a broken arm, but I will be the best at making them comfortable and unafraid.
Anyone who applies themselves in school can learn how to diagnose and treat disease. Not everyone will take the time to treat not just the disease, but also the person. As a physician assistant I will be able to focus on each patient as an individual, learn who they are, alleviate their fears and tension, and take time to help them understand exactly what is happening and why. Individuals are scared of the unknown. By providing them with understanding of the situation, fear will automatically dissipate.
As a physician assistant, my deepest goal will be to be remembered. I will be remembered by all of the team members I work with not only as a reliable teammate, but also as an emotional buoy to those around me. I will be remembered by professors and classmates at my various schools as the student who will go on to become the best in my field. And most importantly, I will be remembered by my patients not simply because I alleviated their illness, but because of how I made them feel while helping them.

Thanks for your time!

“With the cliché “I want to help people” words in my mouth, and dollar signs in my eyes at 18 years old I started toward my career goal to become a doctor. During my first spring break, my brother and I were the only witnesses to a motorcycle accident. No helmet, he crashed through a fence and was unconscious and bleeding from his ears when we found him. Minutes later, standing covered in a stranger’s blood, we watched the life flight in no hurry to take off, confirming in our minds that the man had most likely died before our eyes as he was struggling to breathe. I changed my major.”

 

When I was 18 years old, I believed in the cliche of “I want to help people” and becoming a doctor. I did not know the first thing in becoming a doctor but the exposure from television and doctors visits had me convinced that this was the right path for me. Then one day, during spring break, my brother and I witnessed something that would burn an indelible image in our minds. We witnessed a horrific motorcycle accident and had rushed to his aid. The motorcyclist, not wearing a helmet, had slammed into a fence and was bleeding from ear to ear. He struggled to breath. A flight for life crew rushed to the scene, but took their time in leaving the scene. They had confirmed our suspicions all along. The patient had died before our very eyes. After that day, I changed my major and mind in pursuing to be a doctor.

 

-I would take out the doctors and dollar sign. It makes doctors all seem to be money grubbing. Look up Patch Adams or Oliver Sacks. Take it out.

 

“At that young age, I had not considered the hard parts of the medical profession. The long days and nights, the delivery of bad news, and death. I had only thought of the money. For the next ten years I searched for my passion. The perfect job with lots of money, but lacking all the unpleasant hard parts. The kind of jobs that high school advisors talk about. The job where I would wake up and go to work even if I wasn’t getting paid.”

 

I didn’t consider all the work and sacrifice that accompanied the medical profession; the long days and nights at work, the possibility of patient deaths, and the purveyor of bad news to loved ones. I only saw the financial gains. For the next ten years, I searched for that job that had the financial security of a doctor but without the pain and suffering that accompanied it.

 

-You read like you are just chasing money, hate hard work, and just want money. If that’s the case, you better have a compelling argument that counters the kind of person you are later on. You fail to do that so its best to take it out completely and not make yourself look like Scrooge.

 

“Some of the worst advice is given with the best intentions. Life isn’t about avoiding hard things; it is about growing until you can do hard things, and even enjoy hard things.”

 

-Expand, add, or cut this out. It came out of nowhere and just hangs there. Is this part of the previous paragraph? Are you trying to say school counselors give bad advice? Re-read it, edit it, and do something more with it.

 

“The reason I believe a college GPA is a good estimate of how well that person will do in the workforce is because it shows whether that person is willing to give it their all and excel even in the classes they aren't passionate about. They don't give up when it gets hard. They don't blame the professor. They don’t let anything stand in the way of who they want to become.”

 

So, are you saying you have a 4.0 GPA? Again, it came out of the blue. Just having a 4.0 doesn’t mean the student sacrificed a lot. Some people breeze by and get close to a 4.0. Since you say you have kids. Are you saying that you maintained good grades while raising a family? Now, that’s a different story compared to a kid who has no worries but do well in school.

 

“I am not becoming a physician assistant because I enjoy seeing motorcycle injuries, but through applying myself in school, I will be the best of the best at saving the lives that can be saved.”

 

-Why did you choose this path versus a doctor? Why now? Again, that's like a high school statement to claim you will be the best of the best. Are you really going to be the "bestest"? It's a cocky statement. Try something like, "I aspire to be the best that I can be when it comes to saving lives."

 

“As the father of three, I will never enjoy seeing the tears on the face of a child with a broken arm, but I will be the best at making them comfortable and unafraid.”

 

-This came out of nowhere. Why didn't you finish your thought? How does it tie into the previous or latter paragraph? It doesn't. These disjointed sentences just scream rough draft to me.

 

“Anyone who applies themselves in school can learn how to diagnose and treat disease. Not everyone will take the time to treat not just the disease, but also the person. As a physician assistant I will be able to focus on each patient as an individual, learn who they are, alleviate their fears and tension, and take time to help them understand exactly what is happening and why. Individuals are scared of the unknown. By providing them with understanding of the situation, fear will automatically dissipate.
As a physician assistant, my deepest goal will be to be remembered. I will be remembered by all of the team members I work with not only as a reliable teammate, but also as an emotional buoy to those around me. I will be remembered by professors and classmates at my various schools as the student who will go on to become the best in my field. And most importantly, I will be remembered by my patients not simply because I alleviated their illness, but because of how I made them feel while helping them.”

 

-This kind of sounds too much like you want to leave a legacy and not one of self sacrifice and a team player. Not sure about the second sentence. Sounds like a movie line? Clean up the paper, write a few drafts. Walk away, come back to it, read it out loud, then work on it again and again until it flows. If I was going to ask a PA to read my paper. I'd take their time into consideration and give them a final draft at least. No one wants to read a rough draft. At least provide enough paragraph breaks when posting here so people can read it clearly.



#13 Hannthor1216

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 01:35 AM

By the time I was 19, we had already fostered numerous children, many of whom were familiar with the chair of a doctor’s office; I often think of myself as a surrogate sister for the children that stay in our home, even long after they return to their parents. In the past few years, we have opened our home to many children in the system, including those who have specific physical and mental needs. While it is not easy for any student to acknowledge where their career aspirations came from, I can give credit the foster care system for my decision to become a Physician Assistant (PA).

 

Although it was a familiar scene, the three children emerging from the silver sedan in our driveway that afternoon seemed different than the rest; their crooked smiles were bigger than most as they hurried out of the car and towards their new home. The group of three all shared the same blonde hair and blue eyes, but as they made their way to the house it was clear that one sibling was not like the others. Walking the fastest towards the house, and the first to introduce himself as the oldest, was Dylan. Even from a distance, Dylan’s lack of muscle control and inward rotated toes made his diagnosis of Cerebral Palsy obvious. Over the next few months, it became clear to us that Dylan was not like other children his age; although he was the one who was suffering from Cerebral Palsy, he made sure to take care of his younger siblings before anything else, including himself.

 

Having Cerebral Palsy, and being a child in foster care with insurance covered by the state, Dylan had many reoccurring medical visits; while the bi-monthly trips were repetitive, he always looked forward to seeing his PA. For Dylan, his PA not only served as his healthcare provider, but also as an adult who he could have a relationship with and view as a role model; the disconnected relationship with his parents, along with being a child in foster care and lacking a stable home environment, meant that Dylan did not have many adults with whom he felt comfort or stability with. One can imagine that it was very difficult for Dylan to take care of himself, along with filling the parental role for his younger siblings, but I do believe that Dylan’s continuous visits with his PA gave him time to focus on himself in a comfortable environment which allowed him to progress in his treatments. It was clear that his Physician Assistant not only cherished working in pediatrics, but also thoroughly enjoyed his role as Dylan’s healthcare provider and understood the needs, both physical and mental, which he required.

 

Shortly after meeting Dylan and his PA, I thought it would be appropriate to investigate the career and I was interested in discovering more about their role in the lives of patients. During my first two years of college, I was geared towards pharmacy school and had begun taking the necessary prerequisites to do so; prior to the appointments I attended with Dylan, I don’t believe that I even knew what a Physician Assistant was. Just before my junior year, when I started to contemplate changing paths to become a PA, I had already worked in a pharmacy for nearly two years and had the opportunity to see the daily life of a retail pharmacist; I believe that my experience in the pharmacy made the decision to switch career paths simpler for me. After a summer of consideration, and many pro-con lists, I made the decision to change my career goal and focus on becoming a Physician Assistant. While there are several other healthcare roles which I have considered, such as NP or MD, I believe that a career as a PA will provide me with both the job satisfaction and the connection with patients which I desire while having the ability to consult with any supervising physicians. My career aspiration not only stems from my interaction with foster children who have physical or mental needs, but is also based on my inclination to work with patients while using my intellectual ability daily to develop successful treatment plans.



#14 Hendrixrrt

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Posted 30 April 2017 - 10:29 AM

I would like someone to look at my statement, but is there a way to PM it to you? I do not want to post it for everyone to see? Im a little paranoid it might get stolen...sorry if that offends anyone. However the disclaimer says that posts will not be deleted, so it could be here for a really long time.



#15 Hendrixrrt

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Posted 30 April 2017 - 10:40 AM

I would like someone to look at my statement, but is there a way to PM it to you? I do not want to post it for everyone to see? Im a little paranoid it might get stolen...sorry if that offends anyone. However the disclaimer says that posts will not be deleted, so it could be here for a really long time.

 

I figured it out



#16 DavidSmith

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Posted 05 May 2017 - 09:09 AM

Could you please share with us how you figured out your problem? I am really curious about that cause it is an exam season now and I am sure that I will find it hard to finish some tasks. That is why I was advised about the usage of https://supremeessays.net. It is one of the top rated among other services and they offer 18% on the first order by using this coupon code  q94f7d2W. 



#17 reyuval

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Posted 10 May 2017 - 04:06 PM

Thank you for the help. I'll post my current version of my personal statement below. Please take into account that English is my third language. I've done the best I can but there might be some mistakes :-)

 

As a young boy I can still remember listening to my father’s stories from the time he worked as a paramedic. His stories about multiple trauma patients, evacuation from a burning house, and victims of a shooting presented him as a superhero in my eyes. Starting from a young age, my mother introduced me to the wonderful world of sports, which resulted in quite a few injuries. My father the superhero was always there treating a cut or a sprain before our visit to the doctor. Already then I knew that I would like to do the same for my kids one day.

 

Making a positive change in people’s lives was something I loved doing since a very young age. Helping a neighbor carry groceries to his apartment, or aiding my contractor grandfather since the age of 13 at his various sites was not something I only wanted to do, but something I enjoyed.  

 

I always enjoyed solving puzzles! Each knew patient presents with various symptoms, which together, just like a puzzle, can make up the bigger picture. I was always a good student, and a part of this quality is due to the fact that I don’t stop looking for a solution in the face of a problem. This trait helped me overcome plenty of challenges in my life.

 

 

Starting in high school I’ve done a lot of volunteer work. Each experience provided a new setting for the difficult challenge that the field brings. At the age of 16 I volunteered in a local pediatric hospital playroom. I was amazed by the strength of the different kids playing there, smiling, while at the same time dealing with cancer, or other terminal conditions. I wanted to be stronger for them, and aid them in their daily struggle. My experience in a local mental hospital taught me of the challenges of treating patients who cannot cope with reality. This fact did not stop me from trying to find a way to reach into their world. The interaction aided the medical staff in administering their medications. Sometimes communicating helped them calm down when the condition stirred their view of reality.  

 

The time of my service in the Israeli defense forces is probably the most impactful experience leading me to the medical field. I served as an infirmary medic in a military base. For a year I was involved in trauma medicine; Taking and interpreting ECGs; Phlebotomy; and cardiac stress tests administered to the higher ranks occupying the military. This first experience of working in a clinical setting taught me the dynamics between the various roles and their responsibilities in the treatment of a patient. I felt comfortable helping the doctors in assessment and treatment, while they work the more difficult cases. They then let me know that this is comparable to being a physician’s assistant. My service in the army made me determine to pursue working in that field.

 

In order to make a change in people’s lives, and put my experience in sports into good use, I decided to take the role of a personal trainer. Each client supplied a new challenge working towards his ideal self. My experience in this field enforced my decision to be a medical provider and helping people get better.

 

 

While the field of medicine is similar across countries, there are definitely a lot of differences. Currently, I’m shadowing a PA in a local orthopedic clinic to learn more about the field. This experience exposed me to x-ray and MRI studies, and interactions with patients in a local setting. I also learned about the administration roles while working with MA’s. This exposure taught me about the responsibilities of a PA and the scope of practice in the field. 

 

Completing an undergraduate in the life sciences I learned endocrinology and neurology. After moving to the states I dedicated two years to complete a master’s degree in physiology to qualify to the program. Ever determined, and equipped with the various experiences and knowledge I’m looking forward to becoming the PA, a superhero, which I always wanted to be.






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